FamilySearch Wiki talk:LinkingEdit This Page

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Proposal

I believe there is need for a wiki-wide 'linking" style and see three currently in use:

  1. Link directly to the site mentioned using the name of the site as the hot link, e.g., "The Illinois Newspaper Project web page includes a ..."
  2. Describe the site, hit two carriage returns and add the text of the url, then hot-link the text of the URL, e.g., "The Illinois Newspaper Project web page can be found here:
         http://www.library.illinois.edu/inp/
  3. Mention the site and then put the words "web site" in parenthesis and hot link the words "web site", e.g., "The Illinois Newspaper Project (web site) includes a..."OR "The Illinois Newspaper Project web site  includes a..."

All three get the job done, but which one is best for this wiki?
User:Lembley 20:02, October 13, 2009

I would have thought this was in the manual of style already. I did not find it, but would interpret the style as implied as #1. Other links, such as WorldCat, FHLC, and others follow this style. This would be my vote . . . putting the actual link "hidden" behind the title as in #1. Thomas Lerman 19:53, 13 October 2009 (UTC)
I agree that number 1 is the best as the link text provides context. Number 2 in this instance is not completely so bad because it is somewhat readable even though it requires understanding about internet addressing. If the URL as link text was included in an article about a place/organisation and was being given as their website then it would be appropriate to use the URL as the link text. However in the majority of cases there are better alternatives than just using the URL as the link text, particularity if you are deep linking into a website. When doing so it is far better to use words that describe the destination. As for number 3, it looks neat but the context is separated from the link and does not meet accessibility best practise where links should be understood in isolation from the text around it. Therefore number 1 is the best of the 3. (see also Writing effective link text by Trenton Moss) --Steve 18:52, 16 October 2009 (UTC)

Don't use "click here" as link text

When calling the user to action, use brief but meaningful link text that:

  • provides some information when read out of context
  • explains what the link offers
  • doesn't talk about mechanics
  • is not a verb phrase

Further Reading

--Steve 11:34, 14 April 2010 (UTC)