Germany, Saxony, Freiberg Funeral Sermons (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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Revision as of 16:12, 17 November 2011 by ChelsieWoehl (Talk | contribs)
FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Title in the Language of the Records

Please add the title in German here.

Record Description

This collection includes funeral sermons (leichenpredigten) housed in the Andreas-Möller Bibliothek in Freiberg, Saxony, Germany. These sermons were generally prepared and given by ministers at the grave site for the wealthier and some middle class people. They usually contain information such as names, dates, places, relatives, life histories, and sometimes pedigrees for many generations. The information is subject to error as it was reported by relatives who did not always remember facts accurately. Sermons (talks) were written to honor a dead person and were adapted to the family and social context; it contains a vita, also called curriculum vitae (personalschriften), meaning a brief biographical sketch. Sermons were printed privately and distributed to commemorate the deceased person. These sermons cover the period years from 1614 to 1661 and are handwritten in German.

Record Content

Key genealogical facts found in funeral sermons may include:

  • Names
  • Dates
  • Places
  • Relatives
  • Sometimes a pedigree

How to Use the Record

This section will be more succinct and specific to the collection. In some cases the section will link to a longer wiki article that explains more about a type of record or collection.

Related Websites

This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying [other] links to related websites here.

Biographies in Early Modern Germany

Related Wiki Articles

Germany Obituaries

Contributions to This Article

Please add the Contributor Invite Template to encourage wiki user participation.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.

Examples of a Source Citation for a Record Found in a Collection

  • "Delaware Marriage Records," index and images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org): accessed 4 March 2011, entry for William Anderson and Elizabeth Baynard Henry, married 23 November 1913; citing marriage certificate no. 859; FHL microfilm 2,025,063; Delaware Bureau of Archives and Records Management, Dover.
  • “El Salvador Civil Registration,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org): accessed 21 March 2011, entry for Jose Maria Antonio del Carmen, born 9 April 1880; citing La Libertad, San Juan Opico, Nacimientos 1879-1893, image 50; Ministerio Archivo Civil de la Alcaldia Municipal de San Salvador

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the data and images published on FamilySearch.org Historical Records. It may include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

Germany. Church ministers. Funeral sermons, 1614-1661. Andreas Möller Bibliothek, Freiberg, Germany.

Information about creating source citations for FamilySearch Historical Collections is listed in the wiki article Help:How to Create Source Citations For FamilySearch Historical Records Collections.


 

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