Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicates (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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(Difference between revisions)
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This wiki article describes a collection of records that is scheduled to become available for free online at FamilySearch Record Search – Pilot Site.   
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This wiki article describes a collection of records that is scheduled to become available for free online at FamilySearch Record Search.   
  
 
== Collection Time Period<br> ==
 
== Collection Time Period<br> ==
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German states successively began creating church book duplicates from 1792 to 1876. The collection of the Brandenburg&nbsp;Church Book Duplicates covers the years 1794–1874, when Brandenburg was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. The church book duplicates ended with the institution of civil registration in 1876.  
 
German states successively began creating church book duplicates from 1792 to 1876. The collection of the Brandenburg&nbsp;Church Book Duplicates covers the years 1794–1874, when Brandenburg was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. The church book duplicates ended with the institution of civil registration in 1876.  
  
== Collection History<br> ==
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== Record History<br> ==
  
 
Inspired by the institution of civil registration in France in 1792, German states began creating church book duplicates. The German states required the clergy to create a transcript of their church books and turn them in annually to the state. Civil authorities assumed the registration function in Prussia in October 1874 and elsewhere in January 1876.  
 
Inspired by the institution of civil registration in France in 1792, German states began creating church book duplicates. The German states required the clergy to create a transcript of their church books and turn them in annually to the state. Civil authorities assumed the registration function in Prussia in October 1874 and elsewhere in January 1876.  
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The clergy were required to record the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of the people living within their jurisdiction regardless of their religion. For example, Catholics or Jews who lived in an area that did not have a Catholic church or Jewish synagogue were often included in the Lutheran records. The reverse was also true. In Catholic areas, the information for Lutherans and Jews was included in Catholic records. The church book duplicates records&nbsp;cover a majority of the population.  
 
The clergy were required to record the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of the people living within their jurisdiction regardless of their religion. For example, Catholics or Jews who lived in an area that did not have a Catholic church or Jewish synagogue were often included in the Lutheran records. The reverse was also true. In Catholic areas, the information for Lutherans and Jews was included in Catholic records. The church book duplicates records&nbsp;cover a majority of the population.  
  
=== Why was this collection created?<br> ===
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=== Why This Record Was&nbsp;Created<br> ===
  
 
Church book duplicates were created for civil authorities to use.  
 
Church book duplicates were created for civil authorities to use.  
  
=== Collection Reliability <br> ===
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=== Record Reliability <br> ===
  
 
German church book duplicates, like the originals, are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1876, when civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths began in all of Germany. Realize that the ages, birth dates, and birthplaces listed in marriage and death entries may be inaccurate because the information came from an informant's memory. Church book duplicates may differ slightly from the originals because of transcription variations, but they are often more legible than the originals.&nbsp;  
 
German church book duplicates, like the originals, are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1876, when civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths began in all of Germany. Realize that the ages, birth dates, and birthplaces listed in marriage and death entries may be inaccurate because the information came from an informant's memory. Church book duplicates may differ slightly from the originals because of transcription variations, but they are often more legible than the originals.&nbsp;  
  
== Collection Description<br> ==
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== Record Description<br> ==
  
 
Entries are usually arranged in chronological order in columns. The baptisms, marriages, and deaths for one year are grouped together before the baptisms, marriages and deaths for the next year (some of the records include only marriages and deaths, only births and marriages, and so on). Some of the records are on preprinted forms and some include indexes.  
 
Entries are usually arranged in chronological order in columns. The baptisms, marriages, and deaths for one year are grouped together before the baptisms, marriages and deaths for the next year (some of the records include only marriages and deaths, only births and marriages, and so on). Some of the records are on preprinted forms and some include indexes.  
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A German parish was an ecclesiastical jurisdiction made up of many villages and hamlets, with one of those villages designated as the main parish town. A set of church book duplicates usually did not include records from all of the villages in the parish. Instead, it included records from only one village or from a few of the villages. In larger cities where there was more than one church, each church is listed separately.  
 
A German parish was an ecclesiastical jurisdiction made up of many villages and hamlets, with one of those villages designated as the main parish town. A set of church book duplicates usually did not include records from all of the villages in the parish. Instead, it included records from only one village or from a few of the villages. In larger cities where there was more than one church, each church is listed separately.  
  
=== Collection Content[[Image:Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicate Baptism.jpg|thumb|right]]  ===
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=== Record Content[[Image:Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicate Baptism.jpg|thumb|right]]  ===
  
 
'''Important genealogical information found in baptismal duplicate records are:''' <br>• Names of the child, parents, and witnesses or godparents.<br>• Date and place of birth and baptism.<br>• Residence and religion of the parents.<br>• Occupation of the father.<br>• Whether the child was legitimate or illegitimate.  
 
'''Important genealogical information found in baptismal duplicate records are:''' <br>• Names of the child, parents, and witnesses or godparents.<br>• Date and place of birth and baptism.<br>• Residence and religion of the parents.<br>• Occupation of the father.<br>• Whether the child was legitimate or illegitimate.  
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• Names of the deceased, spouse, and parents.<br>• Date and place of the death and burial.<br>• Age and residence of the deceased (sometimes the date and place of birth).<br>• Cause of death  
 
• Names of the deceased, spouse, and parents.<br>• Date and place of the death and burial.<br>• Age and residence of the deceased (sometimes the date and place of birth).<br>• Cause of death  
  
== How to Use the Collection<br> ==
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== How to Use the Record<br> ==
  
 
German church book duplicates are a backup source for church books (parish registers). These church books are the best records for identifying German individuals, parents, and spouses before civil registration of vital events began. German states instituted registration at different times between 1792 and 1874.&nbsp;  
 
German church book duplicates are a backup source for church books (parish registers). These church books are the best records for identifying German individuals, parents, and spouses before civil registration of vital events began. German states instituted registration at different times between 1792 and 1874.&nbsp;  
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When trying to find information, search the records for the villages where the person lived. If you do not find the record you need, you can try the following: (1) look for other people with the same surname in the village, as these individuals could be relatives, and their information might lead you to the correct record; (2) search several years before and after the event you are looking for; and (3) search surrounding villages for the individual's records.<br>
 
When trying to find information, search the records for the villages where the person lived. If you do not find the record you need, you can try the following: (1) look for other people with the same surname in the village, as these individuals could be relatives, and their information might lead you to the correct record; (2) search several years before and after the event you are looking for; and (3) search surrounding villages for the individual's records.<br>
  
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== Related Websites ==
  
== Retalted Wiki Articles  ==
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This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here. <br>
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== Related Wiki Articles  ==
  
 
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Church_Records_Germany Church Records Germany]&nbsp;  
 
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Church_Records_Germany Church Records Germany]&nbsp;  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Church_History_Germany Church History Germany]&nbsp;  
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[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Church_History_Germany Church History Germany]&nbsp;<br>&nbsp;
 
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== Related Websites<br> ==
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This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here.
+
  
== Sources of Information for This Collection  ==
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== Sources of&nbsp;This Collection  ==
  
 
Digital images of original records housed at <span id="fck_dom_range_temp_1256160990950_118" />Brandenburgisches Landeshauptarchiv in Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany.  
 
Digital images of original records housed at <span id="fck_dom_range_temp_1256160990950_118" />Brandenburgisches Landeshauptarchiv in Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany.  

Revision as of 22:24, 16 December 2009

This wiki article describes a collection of records that is scheduled to become available for free online at FamilySearch Record Search. 

Contents

Collection Time Period

German states successively began creating church book duplicates from 1792 to 1876. The collection of the Brandenburg Church Book Duplicates covers the years 1794–1874, when Brandenburg was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. The church book duplicates ended with the institution of civil registration in 1876.

Record History

Inspired by the institution of civil registration in France in 1792, German states began creating church book duplicates. The German states required the clergy to create a transcript of their church books and turn them in annually to the state. Civil authorities assumed the registration function in Prussia in October 1874 and elsewhere in January 1876.

The clergy were required to record the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of the people living within their jurisdiction regardless of their religion. For example, Catholics or Jews who lived in an area that did not have a Catholic church or Jewish synagogue were often included in the Lutheran records. The reverse was also true. In Catholic areas, the information for Lutherans and Jews was included in Catholic records. The church book duplicates records cover a majority of the population.

Why This Record Was Created

Church book duplicates were created for civil authorities to use.

Record Reliability

German church book duplicates, like the originals, are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1876, when civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths began in all of Germany. Realize that the ages, birth dates, and birthplaces listed in marriage and death entries may be inaccurate because the information came from an informant's memory. Church book duplicates may differ slightly from the originals because of transcription variations, but they are often more legible than the originals. 

Record Description

Entries are usually arranged in chronological order in columns. The baptisms, marriages, and deaths for one year are grouped together before the baptisms, marriages and deaths for the next year (some of the records include only marriages and deaths, only births and marriages, and so on). Some of the records are on preprinted forms and some include indexes.

A German parish was an ecclesiastical jurisdiction made up of many villages and hamlets, with one of those villages designated as the main parish town. A set of church book duplicates usually did not include records from all of the villages in the parish. Instead, it included records from only one village or from a few of the villages. In larger cities where there was more than one church, each church is listed separately.

Record Content
Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicate Baptism.jpg

Important genealogical information found in baptismal duplicate records are:
• Names of the child, parents, and witnesses or godparents.
• Date and place of birth and baptism.
• Residence and religion of the parents.
• Occupation of the father.
• Whether the child was legitimate or illegitimate.


Important genealogical information found in marriage duplicate records are:
Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicate Marriage.jpg

• Names of the bride, groom, their parents (usually the fathers), and witnesses.
• Date and place of the marriage and the marriage proclamations (called "banns").
• Age of the bride and groom (sometimes the date and place of birth).
• Residence of the bride, groom, and their parents.
• Religion of the bride and groom.
• Occupation of the groom and of the fathers.



Important genealogical information found in death duplicate records are:
Germany Brandenburg Church Book Duplicate Death.jpg

• Names of the deceased, spouse, and parents.
• Date and place of the death and burial.
• Age and residence of the deceased (sometimes the date and place of birth).
• Cause of death

How to Use the Record

German church book duplicates are a backup source for church books (parish registers). These church books are the best records for identifying German individuals, parents, and spouses before civil registration of vital events began. German states instituted registration at different times between 1792 and 1874. 

When trying to find information, search the records for the villages where the person lived. If you do not find the record you need, you can try the following: (1) look for other people with the same surname in the village, as these individuals could be relatives, and their information might lead you to the correct record; (2) search several years before and after the event you are looking for; and (3) search surrounding villages for the individual's records.

Related Websites

This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here.

Related Wiki Articles

Church Records Germany 

Church History Germany 
 

Sources of This Collection

Digital images of original records housed at Brandenburgisches Landeshauptarchiv in Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany.

How To Cite Your Sources

Instructions for citing this source can be found at: Cite Your Sources (Source Footnotes)




 

CID1478677 Please do not erase or change this identification number.

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