Granite Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and BranchesEdit This Page

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Utah Church Records go to Salt Lake County Church Records go to Granite Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches around 1930's, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941).

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Contents

Granite Stake

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p. 296.[1]

  • Area of the County: southeastern part of Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Headquarters in:
  • Boundaries of stake: consists (1930) of Latter-day Saints residing in the southeastern part of Salt Lake City, extending north to 13th South St. (or Liberty Stake) Liberty Stake, east to the Wasatch Mountains, south to 27th South St. (or Grant Stake) Grant Stake, and west to 5th East St. from 27th South St. to the Park City branch of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad tracks, thence east along said tracks to 7th East St. and north along 7th East St. to 13th South St. (or Liberty Stake).

History Timeline up to about 1930

This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.

  • 1900 - Until January 28 of 1900, all the saints in Salt Lake County, Utah belonged to the Salt Lake Stake, Utah.
  • 1900- Two new stakes were organized, namely Jordan Stake Jordan Stake, Utah, containing the settlements in the south part of the county, and Granite Stake, containing those wards lying centrally in Salt Lake Valley south of Salt Lake City. Granite Stake included the following wards: North Jordan, Granger, South Cottonwood, Big Cottonwood, Mill Creek, East Mill Creek, Sugar House, Forest Dale, Farmers and Hunter, and the Mountain Dell Branch.
  • 1900 - Grant, Murray, and Wilford Wards were added to Granite Stake.
  • 1904 - Winder Ward added
  • 1905 - Emerson, Waterloo, Brinton, Holladay and Bennion added
  • 1906 - Murray 1st and Murray 2nd added
  • 1907 - Miller added
  • 1911 - Big Cottonwood Ward was disorganized
  • 1912 - Parleys added
  • 1914 - Richards and Burton added
  • 1916 - Highland Park added
  • 1917 - Wasatch added
  • 1918 - Wandamere added. A large reservoir to conserve water for Salt Lake City was constructed at Mountain Dell, the place having ceased to be used for residences.
  • 1919 - Hawthorne and Wells added
  • 1924 - Nibley Park added
  • 1928 - Lincoln added


Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records

Wards and Branches (1930's)

Emerson, Forest Dale, Hawthorne, Highland Park, Lincoln, Mountain Dell, Nibley Park, Parleys, Richards, Sugar House and Wasatch.

Emerson Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 225.[2]

Boundaries: Emerson Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 13th South St., (or LeGrand Ward), east by a line running north and south ten rods west of 13th East St. (or Wasatch Ward), south by 17th South St. (or Sugar House Ward), and west by a line running north and south ten rods West of 10th East St. (or Hawthorne Ward).

History timeline

  • 1905 - Emerson Ward, an outgrowth of Sugar House Ward, was organized January 22.

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Forest Dale Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 253-254.[3]

Boundaries: When first organized in 1896 the Forest Dale Ward extended from 21st South St. (then 12th South St.) to 27th South St. (then 13th South). In 1900 the ward was extended further south to a point midway between 13th and 14th South streets (new 27th and 33rd South streets). In 1916 an additional strip of land between 9th and 10th East streets from the railroad tracks to 27th South St. was added to the ward. In 1918 the south part of the ward below 27th South St. was organized as the Wandamere Ward (now in Grant Stake). In 1919 the northwest part of Forest Dale Ward above the railroad tracks and west of 7th East St. was organized as part of the Wells Ward. In 1924 the west part of Forest Dale Ward (west of 7th East St.) was organized as the Nibley Park Ward, and in 1928 that part of Forest Dale Ward which remained north of the railroad tracks was organized as part of the Lincoln Ward; thus Forest Dale Ward was reduced to its present boundaries.

History timeline

  • 1896 - Forest Dale Ward, an outgrowth of Sugar House Ward, was organized Aug. 23 and was part of the Salt Lake Stake.
  • 1900 - Became part of Granite Stake when it was organized.
  • 1905 - A meeting house was erected in the ward on the corner of Ashton avenue and Lake St. (formerly Walnut Ave.).
  • 1913 - An amusement hall was added to the meeting house.
  • 1929 - The chapel and amusement hall were remodeled.

Obtain the Records

Hawthorne Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 326.[4]

Boundaries: Hawthorne Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 13th South St. (or the 31st Ward), east by Lincoln St., or a line running north and south, ten rods west of 10th East St. (or Emerson Ward), south by 17th South St. (or Richards Ward) and West by 7th East St. (or Waterloo Ward).

History timeline

  • 1919 - Hawthorne Ward, an outgrowth of Emerson Ward, was organized June 15 and met in the basement of the Emerson Ward.
  • 1926 - A new meeting house was build.

Obtain the Records

Highland Park Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 335.[5]

Boundaries: Highland Park Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by the Park City branch of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad (or the Lincoln, Sugar House and Parley’s wards), east by 21st East St. (or East Mill Creek Ward), south by 27th South St. and Crandall Avenue (or Wilford and Hillcrest wards), and west by 10th East St. (or Forest Dale Ward).

History timeline

  • 1916 - Organized December 3 from the Sugar House Ward.
  • 1921 - On January 1, the boundary between Highland Park and Wilford Ward was changed, the strip of land known as Plat C of the Highland Park Subdivision being transferred from the Wilford to the Highland Park Ward.
  • 1922 - In October, the boundaries of the Highland Park Ward were again changed so as to include the territory lying between Highland Drive and 17th East St., and from 27th South St. to Crandall Avenue.
  • 1925 - On Sunday, February 22, a fine chapel, erected on Douglas St. and Whitlock Avenue, was dedicated.

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Lincoln Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 434.[6]

Boundaries: Lincoln Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by Ramona and Hollywood Avenues (or Richards Ward), east by 11th East St. (or Sugarhouse Ward), south by the Park City branch of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad (or Forest Dale and Highland Park Wards), and west by 7th East St. (or Wells Ward).

History timeline

  • 1928 - Organized December 9 from the Richards Ward and was named in honor of the late President Abraham Lincoln.
  • 1829 - A massive building was constructed on 9th East St., between Hollywood Ave. and 21st South St., to serve as a chapel for the Lincoln Ward and also as the Granite Stake tabernacle.

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Mountain Dell Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 550-551.[7]

Boundaries: Mountain Dell Ward, Granite Stake, Salt Lake Co., Utah, consisted of Latter-day Saints residing in Parley’s Canyon in the heart of the Wasatch Mountains and on Parley’s Creek (originally called Canyon Creek) and its tributaries. Mountain Dell is 14 miles southeast of the center of Salt Lake City, and its altitude is 5,300 feet above sea level.

History timeline

  • 1850 - Apostle Parley P. Pratt built a toll road from the main forks of this canyon, which road was opened for traffic July 4, 1850, under the name of the Golden Gate. This road, however, was soon afterwards washed out by floods.
  • 1858 - The first settlers established a trading post in the canyon for the accommodation of travelers. In due course of time several saw mills were built in Parley’s Canyon, and farming at the “Dell” was commenced
  • 1867 - In March, a branch of the Church was organized and made a part of the Salt Lake City 12th Ward.
  • 1869 - A more completely organized branch, named Mountain Dell, was established, the branch being then under the jurisdiction of the Sugar House Ward bishopric.
  • 1882 - On Sunday, Aug. 20, the saints at Mountain Dell were organized as a ward.
  • 1895 - The ward organization was discontinued and a presiding elder was appointed.
  • 1900 - Mountain Dell belonged to the Salt Lake Stake until January, 1900, when it became a part of the newly organized Granite Stake.
  • 1918 - The water of Parley’s Creek having been purchased for the use of Salt Lake City, the natural basin, known as Mountain Dell, was converted into a reservoir. But previous to that the people had left the location.

Obtain the Records

Nibley Park

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 584.[8]

Boundaries: Nibley Park Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by the Park City branch of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad (or Wells Ward), east by a line running ten rods west of 7th East St. from the railroad tracks south to Driggs Avenue, and thence south on 7th East St. (or Forest Dale Ward), south by 27th South St. (or Wandamere Ward) and west by 5th East St. (or Burton and Central Park wards).

History timeline

  • 1924 - Nibley Park Ward, an outgrowth of Forest Dale Ward, was organized Sept. 28 and met in the amusement hall of the Forest Dale Ward.
  • 1925 - Ward members met in the amusement hall of the new meeting house under construction.
  • 1926 - The entire building, consisting of a chapel and amusement hall, being finished, was dedicated Oct. 17, 1926.

Obtain the Records

Parleys Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 640.[9]

Boundaries: Parley's Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in a scattered condition in a somewhat extensive area in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by Emigration Creek and 13th South St. (or Wasatch Ward), east by the mountains, south by Parley’s Creek and the Park City branch of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (or East Mill Creek and Highland Park wards), and west by 17th East St. and Emigration Creek (or Sugar House Ward).

History timeline

  • 1912 - Parley’s Ward, an outgrowth of Sugar House Ward, was organized Nov. 3.
  • 1930 - A new meeting house was erected. The name chosen for the ward was given on account of its proximity to Parley’s Canyon, named in honor of Apostle Parley P. Pratt.

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Richards Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 701.[10]

Boundaries: Richards Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City which is bounded on the north by 17th South St. (or Hawthorne Ward), east by 10th East St. (or Sugar House Ward) south by Ramona Avenue (or Lincoln Ward), and west by 7th East St. (or Belvedere Ward).

History timeline

  • 1914 - Richards Ward, named in honor of the late Willard Richards, a member of the First Presidency and a faithful friend of the Prophet Joseph Smith, is an outgrowth of Sugar House Ward and was organized Feb. 24. For a short time after the organization of the Richards Ward, the saints met for worship in a huge tent pitched on the east side of Lincoln Ave. A meeting house was erected on Garfield Ave.
  • 1929 - Jan. 1, all that part of the Richards Ward below Ramona Avenue was transferred to the newly organized Lincoln Ward.

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Sugar House Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 841-843.[11]

Boundaries: Sugar House Ward consists (1930) of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, lying within the following boundaries: Commencing at the intersection of 17th South and 10th East streets, running thence south to Hollywood Avenue, thence east to 11th East St., thence south to the Park City branch of the D. & R. G. Railroad track, thence east to 17th East St., thence north to Westminster Avenue, thence west to 13th East St., thence north to 17th South St., then west to 10th East St., or the place of beginning.

History timeline

  • 1848 - Sugar House Ward dates back to 1848, the year after the Pioneers arrived in the valley and this area was first settled by farmers.
  • 1864 - An organization was formed in the Sugar House Ward for mutual improvement. This organization may consistently be termed the first of its kind in the territory of Utah.
  • 1849 - At a council of the presiding officers of the Church held in Great Salt Lake City Feb. 16, it was decided to organize all that part of Great Salt Lake Valley embraced in the original Five-Acre Survey into a ward to be known as the Canyon Creek Ward. It appears, however, that no such ward was ever organized. The few saints on Canyon Creek attended meetings in Salt Lake City for a number of years
  • 1854 - At a meeting held April 23, the saints on Canyon Creek were organized as a ward called the Sugar House Ward.
  • 1883 - The Sugar House Ward originally embraced the so-called Five-Acre Survey and all the country lying east of it to the foot of the mountains; westward it extended to the Jordan River. Subsequently the southern boundary line was moved about one mile south. At a meeting held Jan. 3, it was decided that all that part of the Sugar House Ward lying north of Roper St. (or 13th South St.) should belong to Salt Lake City wards. This change transferred a good number of families from the Sugar House Ward to the 1st Ward, Salt Lake City, and also some families to the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th wards.
  • 1887 - The western boundary of the ward was placed at 5th East St., or what was then known as the Farmers Precinct, but the ward at that time still contained twenty-two square miles of country lying east and southeast of Salt Lake City boundaries. Little by little, as the population of the city increased, parts of Sugar House Ward were detached from the parent ward and organized as separate wards until its boundaries became as at present constituted. Of all the original wards organized in Salt Lake Valley, or in fact throughout the Church, no single ward has had so many divisions and subdivisions as the Sugar House Ward. It is practically the parent ward to all of the following wards in Salt Lake Valley: Belvedere, Burton, Central Park, Emerson, Forest Dale, Hawthorne, Highland Park, Jefferson, LeGrand, Liberty, Lincoln, McKinley, Nibley Park, Parley’s, Richards, Salt Lake City 30th, Salt Lake City 31st, Southgate, Wasatch, Waterloo, Wells, Whittier and Yale—23 wards altogether.
  • 1900 - Granite Stake organized and Sugar House Ward became part of that stake. Prior to 1900, Sugar House Ward belonged to the Salt Lake Stake.

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Wasatch Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 924-925.[12]

Boundaries: Wasatch Ward, Granite Stake, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City which is bounded on the north by 13th South St. (or Yale Ward), east by Emigration Creek to its junction with 17th East St., and thence south on 17th East (or Parley’s Ward), south by Westminster Avenue (or Sugar House Ward), and west by 13th East as far as 17th South St. (or Sugar House Ward), and thence by a line ten rods west of 17th South St. (or Emerson Ward).

History timeline

  • 1917 - Wasatch Ward was organized June 10, from the east part of Emerson Ward
  • 1919 - The south limit of the ward changed from 17th South St. to Westminster Avenue.

Obtain the Records

References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 296
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 225
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 253-254.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 326.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 335.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 434.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 550-551
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 584.
  9. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 640.
  10. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 701.
  11. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 841-843.
  12. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 924-925.

 

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