Grant Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

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'''Obtain the Records:'''  
 
'''Obtain the Records:'''  
  
*List of {{FHL|Saints. Waterloo|corporate|disp=Waterloo Ward}} church and other records at the [[Family History Library|FamilySearch Library]].  
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*List of {{FHL|Saints. Waterloo|corporate|disp=Waterloo Ward}} church and other records at the [[Family History Library|FamilySearch Library]].
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*For additional resources, see [[LDS Archives and Libraries#Church_History_Library|Church History Library]].
 
*For additional resources, see [[LDS Archives and Libraries#Church_History_Library|Church History Library]].
  

Revision as of 17:33, 20 March 2013

Utah Church Records go to Salt Lake County Church Records go to Grant Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches around 1930's, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 298.

  • Online through BYU Books. (Free) In the Text search box, type the town or unit name and click Go. Select page numbers (tiny) at the right to see the page.
  • Also available through Ancestry.com ($).

Contents

Grant Stake

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p.298.[1]

  • Area of the County:Grant Stake of Zion, is located in Salt Lake City and vicinity or a strip of country south of the city limits extending northward to 13th South St. (or Pioneer and Liberty stakes), eastward to 7th East St. (or Granite Stake), south to the Cottonwood Stake and west to the Jordan River (or Oquirrh Stake).
  • Headquarters in (town):Not Found
  • Boundaries of stake:Grant Stake of Zion, is located in Salt Lake City and vicinity or a strip of country south of the city limits extending northward to 13th South St. (or Pioneer and Liberty stakes), eastward to 7th East St. (or Granite Stake), south to the Cottonwood Stake and west to the Jordan River (or Oquirrh Stake).


History Timeline up to about 1930

This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.

  • 1924 - Grant Stake, was organized May 25, 1924, and contained eight wards as follows: Burton, East Mill Creek, Farmers, Miller, Wandamere, Waterloo, Wells and Wilford.
  • 1924 - On July 20, 1924, three of these wards were divided and four new wards created, namely, Belvedere, Jefferson, McKinley and Whittier. By these changes the district covered by Farmers Ward was divided and that ward disorganized. In 1924, also, Hillcrest Ward was organized from parts of Wilford and Wandamere wards and Central Park and Southgate wards from parts of Burton and Miller wards. This gave to Grant Stake the fourteen wards now within its limits.


Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records

Wards and Branches

Burton, Belvedere, Central Park, East Mill Creek, Hillcrest, Jefferson, Miller, McKinley, Southgate, Wandamere, Waterloo, Wells, Whittier, and Wilford .

Burton Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.102.[2]

Boundaries:

Located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 21st South St., from the Jordan River to 3rd East St., thence the boundary line runs to the Park City branch of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, thence east along said track to 5th East St. This boundary separates Burton Ward from the Cannon, McKinley and Wells wards. On the east the Burton Ward extends to 3rd East St., from 21st South St. to the railroad, but from 5th East St. the boundary line runs to a point 10 rods north of Stratford Ave., or Wells and Nibley Park wards. The south boundary of the Burton Ward is a line running east and west 10 rods north of Stratford Ave., or Southgate and Central Park wards; west the ward extends to the Jordan River.

History timeline:

  • 1914 - Burton Ward, an outgrowth of Farmers (now McKinley) Ward, was organized Feb. 25.
  • 1915 - After the organization of the Burton Ward the saints met for worship in the Farmers Ward, but a building spot having been donated to the ward on Burton Avenue between Main and State streets, a small lumber building, to be used as a temporary chapel, was erected thereon and known as Unity Cottage which was used until a substantial chapel, erected at a cost of $35,000, was completed in 1915.
  • 1919 - In 1919 that part of the ward lying between 21st South St. and the railroad tracks and between 3rd and 5th East streets was transferred to the newly organized Wells Ward.
  • 1923 - There was an amusement hall addition to the chapel done in 1923.
  • 1925 - In 1925 all that part of Burton Ward lying south of a line running east and west, 10 rods north of Stratford Avenue, was transferred to the newly organized Central Park and Southgate wards.
  • 1924 - When first organized Burton Ward belonged to Granite Stake, but when Grant Stake was organized in 1924, it became part of that stake.

Obtain the Records:

Belvedere Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 56.[3]

Boundaries:
Located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 17th South Street (or Whittier and Waterloo wards), east by 7th East Street (or Richards Ward), south by Ramona Avenue from 3rd to 6th East streets and by Hollywood Avenue from 6th to 7th East streets (or Wells Ward), and west by 3rd East Street (or McKinley Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1924 - Belvedere Ward was organized July 20, 1924, from the south part of Waterloo Ward and the north part of Wells Ward, and called Belvedere on account of its fine location, Belvedere being derived from two Latin words meaning beautiful view.
  • 1925 - When the Belvedere Ward was first organized, the saints met in the Waterloo Ward recreation hall, but a desirable building site was soon purchased on the corner of Downington Avenue and 6th East Street, on which the erection of a fine brick chapel was commenced. The east wing of the building was ready for occupancy in September, 1925, and the edifice, which is built in U shape, was completed in 1930 at an estimated cost of $80,000.
  • 1930 - The first meeting was held in it on Sunday, Sept. 21, 1930.

Obtain the Records:

Central Park Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.128.[4]

Boundaries:

Located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by a line running ten rods north of Stratford Avenue (or Burton Ward), east by 5th East Street (or Nibley Park Ward) to 27th South Street and by 4th East Street (or Wandamere Ward); south the ward is bounded by Hustler’s millrace (or Miller Ward) and west by State Street (or Southgate Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1925 - Central Park Ward, an outgrowth of Burton and Miller wards, was organized Aug. 16, 1925. For a short time after the organization of the ward the saints met for worship in the Madison school building.
  • 1926 - A part of Winder’s farm, located at the corner of 3rd East and 27th South Street, having been purchased for a meeting house site, work was started on a commodious chapel; a wing, containing an auditorium (later used for an amusement hall) was opened for meetings in April, 1926. The whole building was finally completed at a cost of about $65,000.

Obtain the Records:

East Mill Creek Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 208.[5]

Boundaries:

Located in that part of Salt Lake County, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 27th South St. (or Parley’s Ward), east by the Wasatch Mountains, south by 39th South St. (or Holladay Ward of the Cottonwood Stake), and west by a line running ten rods east of 21st East St. (or Wilford Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1858 - At a very early day the saints on Mill Creek erected a log school house about a mile above Neff’s Mill, in which meetings and all social gatherings were held. On the return of the saints to Salt Lake in 1858, after the “move south”, another log house was built about half a mile above the mill site, which was used until it was replaced by a brick building in 1878.
  • 1861 - East Mill Creek became a branch of Big Cottonwood Ward. East Mill Creek was called the “upper district” of Mill Creek Ward.
  • 1877 - July 15, the district was organized as the East Mill Creek Ward.
  • 1893 - In 1893 a commodious one-story brick building was erected in East Mill Creek for school purposes, which edifice was later secured by the ward and with important additions, costing about $50,000, made in 1922, gave to the East Mill Creek Ward one of the most commodious L. D. S. meeting houses in Salt Lake County. It is located on 27th East St., near the intersection with Evergreen St., and about 20 rods east of the original Neff Mill site.
  • 1900 - For many years East Mill Creek Ward belonged to the Salt Lake Stake, but when the Granite Stake was organized in 1900.
  • 1924 - when Grant Stake was organized in 1924, East Mill Creek Ward was transferred to that stake.

Obtain the Records:

Hillcrest Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 336.[6]

Boundaries:

Hillcrest Ward, Grant Stake, is located in that part of Salt Lake Co., Utah, which is bounded on the north by 27th South St. (or Forest Dale and Highland Park Wards), east by 11th East St. (or Wilford Ward), south by 36th South St. (the south limit of Grant Stake), and west by 8th East St. (or Wandamere Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1924 - Hillcrest Ward, an outgrowth of Wilford and Wandamere Wards, was organized Oct. 12th. Immediately after the organization of the ward, a frame meeting house was erected upon land donated for the purpose.
  • 1926 - This building served until 1926, when on the same building lot a modern brick chapel was erected, containing an auditorium capable of seating 500 persons. This house is No. 3159 So. 9th East St., about four miles southeast of the center of Salt Lake City.

Obtain the Records:

Jefferson Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.374.[7]

Boundaries:

Jefferson Ward, Grant Stake, is located in that part of Salt Lake City which is bounded on the north by 13th South St. (or the 5th and 30th wards, Pioneer Stake), east by State St. (or the Whittier Ward), south by 17th South St. (or McKinley Ward), and west by 6th West St. (or Cannon Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1924 - Jefferson Ward, an outgrowth of Farmers Ward, was organized July 20.
  • 1930 - The ward was so named on account of its being in the Jefferson school district. For a time after the organization of the ward, the saints met for worship in the basement of the McKinley Ward meeting house, but steps were taken towards the erection of a commodious building, which, when finished, would consist of a chapel and an amusement hall, several class rooms and every modern convenience.

Obtain the Records:

McKinley Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.457.[8]

Boundaries:

Consists of that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 17th South St. (or Jefferson and Whittier wards), east by 3rd East St.,(or Belvedere and Wells wards), south by 21st South St., (or Burton Ward), and west by 6th West St., (or Cannon Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1877 - In 1877 Sugar House Ward, which hitherto had included all that part of Salt Lake City lying south of 9th South St., from the Wasatch Mountains to the Jordan River, was divided, and the west part of the same organized as the Farmers Ward, so named on account of it being a prosperous farming district. From time to time as new wards were organized, the area of the parent ward was decreased.
  • 1924 - July 20, the remaining part was divided into three wards, namely, McKinley, Jefferson and Whittier wards. As the Farmers Ward meeting house (on South State St.) is located in that part of the district which became the McKinley Ward, this ward may, in a measure, be considered a continuation of the former Farmers Ward. The name selected was given on account of the ward being within the limits of the McKinley School District.

Obtain the Records:

Miller Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 508-509.[9]

Boundaries:

Miller Ward, Grant Stake, located in that part of Salt Lake County, Utah, which lies approximately between 30th and 36th South streets and 4th East and 8th West streets. At one time the ward extended somewhat further north than 27th South Street and westward to the Jordan River, but the increase of population necessitating the organization of other wards, Miller Ward was finally reduced to its present boundaries.

History timeline

  • 1907 - Miller Ward, an outgrowth of Mill Creek Ward, was organized March 17. For a time after the organization of the ward, the saints of Miller Ward met in the basement of the Granite Stake tabernacle, but steps were taken to erect a chapel on a site which had been secured on 33rd South Street between Main and State streets.
  • 1917 - Although used for some time previously, this chapel was erected at a cost of about $40,000 and dedicated Jan. 7. It contains an auditorium capable of seating 300 people, an amusement hall and a number of class rooms. Improvements made later at a cost of about $12,000 included a moving picture equipment, making the building more modern.
  • 1924 - When first organized, Miller Ward belonged to Granite Stake, but when Grant Stake was organized in 1924, the ward became part of that stake.

Obtain the Records

Southgate Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.822.[10]

Boundaries:

Southgate Ward, Grant Stake, located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, lying approximately between 26th and 30th South streets, and extending from State St. to the Jordan River. On the north the ward is bounded by Burton Ward, on the east by Central Park Ward, on the south by Miller Ward, and on the west by Granger Ward (or the Jordan River).

History timeline:

  • 1925 - Southgate Ward, an outgrowth of Burton and Miller wards, was organized Aug. 16, 1925. Immediately after the organization of the ward, a temporary frame meeting house was erected on a building site secured on the corner of 27th South and Main streets, and served the ward.
  • 1929 - In 1929, a fine modern brick chapel was built. This commodious edifice, erected in 1929 at a cost of $31,500, contains an auditorium capable of seating 300 persons, a Relief Society hall with kitchen, and ten class rooms.

Obtain the Records:

Wandamere Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.920.[11]

Boundaries:

Wandamere Ward, Grant Stake, located in that part of Salt Lake County, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 27th South St. (or Nibley Park and Forest Dale wards), east by 8th East St. (or Hillcrest Ward), south by 33rd South St., from 4th to 5th East streets, and by Scott Avenue from 7th to 8th East streets (or Mill Creek Ward), and west by 4th East St. (or Central Park and Miller wards).

History timeline:

  • 1918 - Wandamere Ward, an outgrowth of Forest Dale, Miller and Wilford wards, was organized May 12. The ward was named on account of a pleasure resort of that name being within the limits of the ward.
  • 1919 - When first organized, the saints of Wandamere Ward met for worship in the Granite High School, but a fine building site was purchased on 7th East St., on which a modern chapel, with an auditorium capable of seating 350 people, was erected in 1919.
  • 1924 - When first organized, Wandamere Ward belonged to Granite Stake, but became a part of Grant Stake in 1924.

Obtain the Records:

Waterloo Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.929.[12]

Boundaries:

Waterloo Ward, Grant Stake, is located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which lies between 4th and 7th East streets and 13th and 17th South streets. It is bounded on the north by Liberty Ward in the Liberty Stake, on the east by Hawthorne Ward in the Granite Stake, on the south by Belvedere Ward, and on the west by Whittier Ward.

History timeline:

  • 1905 - Waterloo Ward, an outgrowth of Farmers Ward, was organized Jan. 29.
  • 1906 - A year later the saints of the ward had erected a modern brick chapel on 5th East St., which contains an auditorium capable of seating 450 people.
  • 1919 - The part of the Waterloo Ward lying south of 17th South St. was transferred to the Belvedere Ward. The Wells Ward was organized in 1919 from the south part of Waterloo Ward, which, up to that time, had extended as far south as 21st South St.
  • 1924 - When first organized the ward extended westward to 3rd East St., but this west strip was transferred to Whittier Ward in 1924. When first organized, Waterloo Ward belonged to Granite Stake, but was transferred to Grant Stake in 1924. The ward was named Waterloo on account of the Waterloo Addition, a residential subdivision, being within the limits of the ward.
  • 1929 -Important additions to this building were made in 1929.

Obtain the Records:

Wells Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.934-935.[13]

Boundaries:

Wells Ward, Grant Stake, located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by Westminster Avenue from 3rd to 6th East streets and by Ramona Avenue from 6th to 7th East streets (or Belvedere Ward), on the east by 7th East St. (or Lincoln Ward), on the south by the Park City branch of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (or Burton and Nibley Park wards), and on the west by 3rd East St. (or McKinley and Burton wards).

History timeline:

  • 1919 - Wells Ward, an outgrowth of Waterloo, Forest Dale and Burton wards, was organized June 22. For some time after the organization of the ward the saints met for worship at the old Clark home, on the corner of 5th East and 21st South streets, but steps were taken toward the erection of a chapel on 5th East St. between Hollywood and Redondo avenues. This chapel and amusement hall, built in U shape at a cost of about $100,000, has an auditorium capable of seating one thousand persons. The interior of the chapel is decorated with a mural base relief representing the Savior and the woman of Samaria at the well.
  • 1924 - When first organized, Wells Ward belonged to the Granite Stake of Zion, but in 1924 was transferred to Grant Stake.

Obtain the Records:

Whittier Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 949-950.[14]

Boundaries:

Whittier Ward, Grant Stake, located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 13th South St. (or Liberty Ward in Liberty Stake), on the east by 4th East St. (or Waterloo Ward), on the south by 17th South St. (or McKinley and Belvedere wards), and on the west by State St. (or Jefferson Ward).

History timeline:

  • 1924 - Whittier Ward, so named on account of its being in the previously created Whittier School District, was organized July 20, from parts of Farmers and Waterloo wards.
  • 1930 - For a short time after the organization of the Whittier Ward the saints met for worship in the amusement hall of the McKinley Ward, but a building site was secured on the corner of Kensington Avenue and 2nd East St., upon which a handsome brick building was erected, intended for an amusement hall when the building, as planned, should be completed. In this building meetings are still held, but the erection of the chapel was under consideration in 1930.

Obtain the Records:

Wilford Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.951-952.[15]

Boundaries:

Wilford Ward, Grant Stake, located in Salt Lake County, Utah, which is bounded on the north by 27th South St. (or Highland Park Ward), east by the White Ditch near 20th East St. (or East Mill Creek Ward), south by Murphy’s Lane, or 36th South St. (or Winder Ward), and west by 11th East St. (or Hillcrest Ward). When first organized the ward extended to 9th East St., but upon the organization of Hillcrest Ward in 1924 the west boundary was changed to 11th East St. There have been a few other minor changes in boundaries.

History timeline:

  • 1900 - At a meeting held Sept. 30, attended by the Granite Stake presidency, the 4th District, or Wilford Branch of Mill Creek Ward, was organized as a separate ward.
  • 1924 - The Granite Stake was divided and the Wilford Ward was transferred to the Grant Stake.
  • 1930 - A brick chapel was erected which, remodeled and with some additions, still served as the ward chapel.

Obtain the Records:

Waterloo Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p.929.[16]

Boundaries:

Waterloo Ward, Grant Stake, is located in that part of Salt Lake City, Utah, which lies between 4th and 7th East streets and 13th and 17th South streets. It is bounded on the north by Liberty Ward in the Liberty Stake, on the east by Hawthorne Ward in the Granite Stake, on the south by Belvedere Ward, and on the west by Whittier Ward.

History timeline:

  • 1905 - Waterloo Ward, an outgrowth of Farmers Ward, was organized Jan. 29.
  • 1906 - A year later the saints of the ward had erected a modern brick chapel on 5th East St., which contains an auditorium capable of seating 450 people.
  • 1919 - The part of the Waterloo Ward lying south of 17th South St. was transferred to the Belvedere Ward. The Wells Ward was organized in 1919 from the south part of Waterloo Ward, which, up to that time, had extended as far south as 21st South St.
  • 1924 - When first organized the ward extended westward to 3rd East St., but this west strip was transferred to Whittier Ward in 1924. When first organized, Waterloo Ward belonged to Granite Stake, but was transferred to Grant Stake in 1924. The ward was named Waterloo on account of the Waterloo Addition, a residential subdivision, being within the limits of the ward.
  • 1929 -Important additions to this building were made in 1929.

Obtain the Records:

References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.298.
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 102.
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.56.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 128.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 208.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 336.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 374.
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.457.
  9. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 508-509.
  10. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 822..
  11. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 920.
  12. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 929.
  13. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 934-935.
  14. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 949-950.
  15. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 951-952.
  16. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 929.