Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections

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== Why should You Cite Your Sources?  ==
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== Why Should You Cite Your Sources?  ==
  
When you copy information from a record, you should also list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again.
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This article describes how to create citations for records found in digital collections in the Historical [[Image:Collections.jpg|right|160px|Where did you get your info?]]Records section of FamilySearch.org. These wiki articles are distinguished by the suffix (FamilySearch Historical Records) in the article title.<br>
  
'''One way to to list the source is:'''
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When you copy information from a record, you should also list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again.
  
*Name of the collection
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It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the&nbsp;names of&nbsp;the people you looked for in the records.  
*The phrase "digital images",
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*The name of the web site. In the case of FamilySearch collections, that would be&nbsp;"from FamilySearch Internet
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*The&nbsp;address of the web site, in parenthesis, followed by the date that you found your information in the website. In the case&nbsp;of FamilySearch collections it would look like:,&nbsp;"from ''FamilySearch Internet ''([http://www.familysearch.org/ www.familysearch.org]":&nbsp;July 19, 2010).&nbsp;
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'''You might want to add some other things to document the record, including:'''
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'''A suggested format for citing sources is: '''<br>
  
*Name of the person mentioned in the document
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"[Title of the Collection]," [Index and Images '''or''' Index], <i>FamilySearch</i> ([record pal] : [accessed date]), [Name of the Ancestor] (in entry for - Name of the main person on the record if not the ancestor you are citing), [Event date]; citing [Event location], [reference information], [NARA microfilm publication number], [Roll number], [Name of the repository], [Location of the repository]; [FHL microfilm number].
*File, folder or jacket number  
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*Locality
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Records vary in format and content so these fields will probably not all be included in the record you are citing. Try your best to get as many of them filled in. It is also okay to add additional fields that you feel should be included. The more information, the better it will be to find the record again.
*Record type
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*Page number
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'''Examples of citations for indexed collections:'''<br>
*Line number
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*Date of entry  
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*"Alabama, County Marriages, 1809-1950," index and images, <i>FamilySearch</i> (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTW8-92L : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Robert Richards and Pearl Johnson, 14 Oct 1902; citing Baldwin County; FHL microfilm 1839624.
*Digital identification number
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*Film number
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*"Argentina, Capital Federal, Catholic Church Records, 1737-1977," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V688-2HW : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Anna Gallero in entry for Bernardo Bertrandi and Catalina Botta, 1870.
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*"Mexico, Baptisms, 1560-1950," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N83S-HXH : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Maria Felicitas Avalos, 08 Mar 1893; citing Atotonilco el Alto, Jalisco, Mexico, reference 112; FHL microfilm 222137.
  
It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the&nbsp;names of&nbsp;the people you looked for in the records.
 
  
===== Examples:  =====
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These citations are now found at the bottom of the results page for indexed collections in ''FamilySearch''. <br>
  
*United States. Bureau of the Census. 12th census, 1900, digital images, From FamilySearch Internet (www.familysearch.org&nbsp;: September 29, 2006), Arizona Territory, Maricopa, Township 1, East Gila, Salt River Base and Meridian; sheet 9B, line 71&nbsp;
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'''Example for a Browsed Collection:'''<br>
  
<br>
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“Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 28 February, 2012), La Plata > San Ponciano > Matrimonios 1884-1886 > image 71 of 389 images, Artemio Avendano and Clemtina Peralta, 1884; citing Parroquia de San Ponciano en la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Matrimonios. San Ponciano, La Plata, Buenos Aires.<br>  
  
*Texas Deaths, 1890-1976, digital images, FamilySearch Internet (www.familysearch.org, April 8, 2010), Death notice of Dorthy Mae Cavender Dec. 9, 1929, Harlingen, Cameron, Texas, image number 3524, reference number cn57436&nbsp;
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Browse levels are separated by > in this format.  
  
<br>
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{{ featured article }}
  
*Mexico, Distrito Federal, Catholic Church Records, 1886-1933, digital images, from FamilySearch Internet (www.familysearch.org: April 22, 2010), Baptism of Adolfo Fernandez Jimenez, 1 Feb. 1910, San Pedro Apóstol, Cuahimalpa, Distrito Federal, Mexico, film number 0227023<br>
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{{H-langs|en=Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|es=Ayuda:Cómo citar Colecciones de FamilySearch}}
  
===  ===
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[[Category:FamilySearch_Historical_Records]]

Revision as of 15:33, 22 February 2013

Why Should You Cite Your Sources?

This article describes how to create citations for records found in digital collections in the Historical
Where did you get your info?
Records section of FamilySearch.org. These wiki articles are distinguished by the suffix (FamilySearch Historical Records) in the article title.

When you copy information from a record, you should also list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again.

It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for citing sources is:

"[Title of the Collection]," [Index and Images or Index], FamilySearch ([record pal] : [accessed date]), [Name of the Ancestor] (in entry for - Name of the main person on the record if not the ancestor you are citing), [Event date]; citing [Event location], [reference information], [NARA microfilm publication number], [Roll number], [Name of the repository], [Location of the repository]; [FHL microfilm number].

Records vary in format and content so these fields will probably not all be included in the record you are citing. Try your best to get as many of them filled in. It is also okay to add additional fields that you feel should be included. The more information, the better it will be to find the record again.

Examples of citations for indexed collections:

  • "Alabama, County Marriages, 1809-1950," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTW8-92L : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Robert Richards and Pearl Johnson, 14 Oct 1902; citing Baldwin County; FHL microfilm 1839624.
  • "Argentina, Capital Federal, Catholic Church Records, 1737-1977," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V688-2HW : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Anna Gallero in entry for Bernardo Bertrandi and Catalina Botta, 1870.
  • "Mexico, Baptisms, 1560-1950," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N83S-HXH : accessed 22 Feb 2013), Maria Felicitas Avalos, 08 Mar 1893; citing Atotonilco el Alto, Jalisco, Mexico, reference 112; FHL microfilm 222137.


These citations are now found at the bottom of the results page for indexed collections in FamilySearch.

Example for a Browsed Collection:

“Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 28 February, 2012), La Plata > San Ponciano > Matrimonios 1884-1886 > image 71 of 389 images, Artemio Avendano and Clemtina Peralta, 1884; citing Parroquia de San Ponciano en la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Matrimonios. San Ponciano, La Plata, Buenos Aires.

Browse levels are separated by > in this format.