How to Start Your Family HistoryEdit This Page

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== Step 1. Write Down What You Already Know about Your Family==
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== Step 1. Write Down What You Already Know about Your Family ==
{{outdated|part=section|External links to familysearchwiki.org do not work}}
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Start with yourself. Use worksheets such as a pedigree chart and family group sheets to write down the information you already know about yourself and your family.
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Start with yourself. Use a worksheet such as a pedigree chart or family group sheet to write down the information you already know about yourself and your family.  
  
A [http://www.familysearchwiki.org/worldwide-content/getting-started-with-your-genealogy/how-do-i-start-my-family-history/pedigree-chart/Pedigree_Chart.bmp '''pedigree chart'''] may be used to show you, your parents, grandparents, and great grandparents.
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Use a [https://www.familysearch.org/learn/getting_started '''pedigree chart'''] to record information about yourself, your parents, grandparents, and great grandparents. If you do not know exact dates and places, estimate them.  
  
A [http://www.familysearchwiki.org/worldwide-content/getting-started-with-your-genealogy/how-do-i-start-my-family-history/family-group-sheet/Family_Group_Record_Page1.bmp '''family group sheet page 1'''] and '''[http://www.familysearchwiki.org/worldwide-content/getting-started-with-your-genealogy/how-do-i-start-my-family-history/family-group-sheet/Family_Group_Record_Page2.bmp page 2]''' may be used to show more complete information about parents with their children.
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Download software for [https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/PAF_and_Other_Genealogy_Software Personal Ancestral File (PAF)], [https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Windows_Genealogy_Software Windows] or [https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Mac_Genealogy_Software Mac] to help you organize and share your genealogy.  
  
If you do not know exact dates or places, estimate them.
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== Step 2. Review What Is Missing==
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'''Beginning July 15, 2013, PAF will be retired and will no longer be available for download or support. '''For full details and for information on alternative products, please visit http://familysearch.org/PAF.  
  
Highlight missing or incomplete information on your worksheets. Decide what information you want to find first. At first limit this list to a few pieces of needed information. If you chase too many rabbits, you'll likely catch none of them.
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== Step 3. Find Out What Information Already Exists==
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== Step 2. Review What Is Missing  ==
  
'''Gather your records.''' Start with the records you have in your possession, and gather them into one place. Organize them, and see what family history information you already have.
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Circle any missing or incomplete information on your worksheet. Decide what information you want to find first
  
'''Talk to your family.''' Listen to relatives and family friends. Record any useful information or stories they provide. Ask about copies of birth, marriage, and death certificates, journals, letters, photos, and other records that might be available. If you can, have a way to copy their documents as most are reluctant to let loose of important papers. A scanner or digital camera may work well for this.
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== Step 3. Find Out What Information Already Exists  ==
  
'''Search other sources.''' If you have a computer, it is often helpful to visit family history Web sites. For example, the FamilySearch™ Web site at [http://www.familysearch.org/ www.familysearch.org] provides access to billions of names, dates, and other worthwhile information. FamilySearch can also connect you to other useful family history Web sites and resources. These Web sites often provide valuable family history information.
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'''Gather your records.''' Start with the records you have in your possession, and gather them into one place. Organize them, and see what family history information you already have.  
  
Visit a Family History Center near you to receive help on how to use FamilySearch, evaluate the information you find on the Internet, and get free research assistance. Staff members will gladly help you with your research questions. For the location of a center near you, go to [http://www.familysearch.org/ www.familysearch.org] or call 1-866-406-1830 in the (United States and Canada).
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'''Talk to your family.''' Talk to relatives or family friends. Record any useful information or stories they provide. Ask about copies of birth, marriage, and death certificates, journals, letters, photos, and other records that might be available.  
  
== Step 4. Share What You Have and Decide What You Want to Learn Next==
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'''Search other sources.''' If you have a computer, it is often helpful to visit family history Web sites on the Internet. For example, the FamilySearch™ Web site at [https://www.familysearch.org/ www.familysearch.org] provides access to millions of names, dates, and other worthwhile information. FamilySearch can also connect you to other useful family history Web sites and resources. These Web sites often provide valuable family history information.
  
After you have organized your information make copies of family charts, photographs, and stories. Share them with family members. This will ensure that your family information is preserved and may interest other family members in their family history. Using what you have gathered, decide what you would like to learn next. Decide which ancestors you would like to know more about and where you might find additional information about them. You could also leave a written history of yourself for family members and posterity.
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Visit a family history center near you to receive help on how to use FamilySearch, evaluate the information you find on the Internet, and get free research assistance. Staff members will gladly help you with your research questions. For the Family History Center near you, go to [[Introduction to LDS Family History Centers|FamilySearch]] .  
  
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== Step 4. Share What You Have and Decide What You Want to Learn Next ==
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After you have organized your information make copies of family charts, photographs, and stories, and share them with family members. This will ensure that your family information is preserved and may help to interest other family members in their family history. Using what you have gathered, decide what you would like to learn next. Decide which ancestors you would like to know more about and where you might find additional information about them. You could also leave a written history of yourself for family members and posterity.
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{{H-langs|en=How to Start Your Family History|es=Cómo empezar su historia familiar}}
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[[Category:Beginners]]

Latest revision as of 00:35, 23 November 2013

Contents

Step 1. Write Down What You Already Know about Your Family

Start with yourself. Use a worksheet such as a pedigree chart or family group sheet to write down the information you already know about yourself and your family.

Use a pedigree chart to record information about yourself, your parents, grandparents, and great grandparents. If you do not know exact dates and places, estimate them.

Download software for Personal Ancestral File (PAF), Windows or Mac to help you organize and share your genealogy.


Beginning July 15, 2013, PAF will be retired and will no longer be available for download or support. For full details and for information on alternative products, please visit http://familysearch.org/PAF.


Step 2. Review What Is Missing

Circle any missing or incomplete information on your worksheet. Decide what information you want to find first

Step 3. Find Out What Information Already Exists

Gather your records. Start with the records you have in your possession, and gather them into one place. Organize them, and see what family history information you already have.

Talk to your family. Talk to relatives or family friends. Record any useful information or stories they provide. Ask about copies of birth, marriage, and death certificates, journals, letters, photos, and other records that might be available.

Search other sources. If you have a computer, it is often helpful to visit family history Web sites on the Internet. For example, the FamilySearch™ Web site at www.familysearch.org provides access to millions of names, dates, and other worthwhile information. FamilySearch can also connect you to other useful family history Web sites and resources. These Web sites often provide valuable family history information.

Visit a family history center near you to receive help on how to use FamilySearch, evaluate the information you find on the Internet, and get free research assistance. Staff members will gladly help you with your research questions. For the Family History Center near you, go to FamilySearch .

Step 4. Share What You Have and Decide What You Want to Learn Next

After you have organized your information make copies of family charts, photographs, and stories, and share them with family members. This will ensure that your family information is preserved and may help to interest other family members in their family history. Using what you have gathered, decide what you would like to learn next. Decide which ancestors you would like to know more about and where you might find additional information about them. You could also leave a written history of yourself for family members and posterity.


 

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  • This page was last modified on 23 November 2013, at 00:35.
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