Illinois, County Marriages (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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{{Record Search article
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{{FamilySearch_Collection
 
|location=United States
 
|location=United States
 
|CID=CID1803970
 
|CID=CID1803970
|title=Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934
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|title=Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934}}<br>  
}} <br>  
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== Collection Time Period  ==
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Records in this collection are for the years 1810 to 1934.
+
  
 
== Record Description  ==
 
== Record Description  ==
  
Genealogical facts usually found in Illinois marriage records are:
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The collection consists of indexes and images of county marriages from the state of Illinois for the years 1810 to 1934. The records in this collection are for 57 counties. The type of record and the time period varies by county. Some counties also have a few birth records mixed in with the marriages.
  
 
Illinois marriage records included marriage registers and marriage licenses. Sometimes only one type of marriage record was preserved. Early county marriage records were handwritten into bound books with multiple entries to a page. These records provided little more than the date of marriage, names of the bride and groom, and the person who performed the marriage.  
 
Illinois marriage records included marriage registers and marriage licenses. Sometimes only one type of marriage record was preserved. Early county marriage records were handwritten into bound books with multiple entries to a page. These records provided little more than the date of marriage, names of the bride and groom, and the person who performed the marriage.  
  
By the mid-1800s the counties had preprinted register books. Starting in 1877, marriage register books provided columns for ages, residences, birth places, and sometimes the names of the parents or guardians of the bride and groom.
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=== Citation for This Collection  ===
  
The records in this collection are for 57 counties in Illinois. The type of record and the time period will vary by counties. Some counties also have a few birth records mixed in with the marriages.  
+
The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.  
 +
 
 +
{{Collection citation | text= "Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934." Index. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.}}
  
 
=== Record Content  ===
 
=== Record Content  ===
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<gallery>
 
<gallery>
Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 1 DGS 4539312 72.jpg
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Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 1 DGS 4539312 72.jpg|Marriage Record Example #1
Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 2 DGS 4539320 40.jpg
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Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 2 DGS 4539320 40.jpg|Marriage Record Example #2
Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 3 DGS 4539811 592.jpg
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Image:Illinois County Marriages (10-0087) (10-0113) Example 3 DGS 4539811 592.jpg|Marriage Record Example #3
</gallery>
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</gallery>  
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Key genealogical facts usually found in this collection contains the following:
  
 
*Marriage date  
 
*Marriage date  
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== How to Use the Record  ==
 
== How to Use the Record  ==
  
Begin your search by finding your ancestors in the index. Name indexes to marriages make it possible to access a specific marriage record quickly. Remember that these indexes may contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
+
To begin you search it is helpful to know the name of the person at the time of marriage and some other identifying information such as:
  
When searching the index it is helpful to know the following:
+
*The county where the marriage occurred
 +
*The approximate marriage date
 +
*The name of the intended spouse
  
*The county where the marriage occurred.
+
==== Search the Collection ====
*The name of the person at the time of marriage.
+
*The approximate marriage date.
+
*The marriage place.
+
*The name of the intended spouse.
+
  
Use the locator information found in the index (such as page, entry, or certificate number) to locate your ancestors in the marriage records. Compare the information in the marriage record to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct person. You may need to compare the information of more than one person to make this determination.  
+
To search the collection by name fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:
 +
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
 +
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
 +
*Your ancestor may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
 +
*Indexes may contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
 +
 
 +
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at
 +
[http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].
 +
 
 +
==== Using the Information ====
  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s marriage record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example:  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s marriage record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example:  
  
 
*Use the marriage date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.  
 
*Use the marriage date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.  
*Use the age to calculate an approximate birth date  
+
*Use the age to calculate an approximate birth date.
 
*Use the birth date or age along with the residence to find the family in census records.  
 
*Use the birth date or age along with the residence to find the family in census records.  
 
*Use the residence to locate church and land records.  
 
*Use the residence to locate church and land records.  
 +
 +
==== Tips to Keep in Mind ====
 +
 +
*Indexes may contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
 
*The name of the officiator is a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county. However, ministers may have reported marriages performed in other counties.  
 
*The name of the officiator is a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county. However, ministers may have reported marriages performed in other counties.  
*Compile the marriage entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom, this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.  
+
*Compile the marriage entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.  
 
*Continue to search the marriage records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives of the bride and groom who may have married in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.  
 
*Continue to search the marriage records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives of the bride and groom who may have married in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.  
 
*Use the marriage number to identify previous marriages.  
 
*Use the marriage number to identify previous marriages.  
 
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
 
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
 
Keep in mind:
 
 
 
*The information in marriage records is usually reliable, but depends upon the reliability of the informant.  
 
*The information in marriage records is usually reliable, but depends upon the reliability of the informant.  
 
*Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1800s.  
 
*Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1800s.  
 
*There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.
 
*There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.
  
If you are unable to find the ancestors you are looking for, try the following:
+
==== Unable to Find Your Ancestor?  ====
  
 
*Check for variant spellings of the surnames.  
 
*Check for variant spellings of the surnames.  
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*Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.
 
*Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.
  
== Record History ==
+
==== Additional Information About These Records ====
 +
 
 +
By the mid-1800s the counties had preprinted register books. Starting in 1877, marriage register books provided columns for ages, residences, birth places, and sometimes the names of the parents or guardians of the bride and groom.
  
 
Marriage returns were reported by the minister or Justice of the Peace who performed the marriage. County histories can be checked to learn which religion and congregation a minister served. Ministers’ returns may reveal that the marriage took place in a private residence, often the home of a parent or relative.  
 
Marriage returns were reported by the minister or Justice of the Peace who performed the marriage. County histories can be checked to learn which religion and congregation a minister served. Ministers’ returns may reveal that the marriage took place in a private residence, often the home of a parent or relative.  
Line 82: Line 92:
 
The county clerk usually kept marriage records from the time the county was organized. The counties continue to record marriages to the present day and only county clerks can issue certified copies of the marriage certificate. A statewide register of marriages began in 1962 as county clerks forwarded marriage information to the Illinois Department of Health. If you do not know the county where a couple married after 1962, the Division of Vital Records may provide the marriage date and county.  
 
The county clerk usually kept marriage records from the time the county was organized. The counties continue to record marriages to the present day and only county clerks can issue certified copies of the marriage certificate. A statewide register of marriages began in 1962 as county clerks forwarded marriage information to the Illinois Department of Health. If you do not know the county where a couple married after 1962, the Division of Vital Records may provide the marriage date and county.  
  
=== Why This Record Was Created  ===
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Counties in Illinois recorded marriages to legalize marital relationships and to safeguard the interests of wives.  
 
+
Counties in Indiana recorded marriages to legalize marital relationships and to safeguard the interests of wives.  
+
 
+
=== Record Reliability  ===
+
  
 
The marriage date, residence, and other facts that were current at the time the marriage occurred are quite reliable, though there is still a chance of misinformation. Other data such as age or birth place have more chance of error due to the lapse of time between marriage and birth.  
 
The marriage date, residence, and other facts that were current at the time the marriage occurred are quite reliable, though there is still a chance of misinformation. Other data such as age or birth place have more chance of error due to the lapse of time between marriage and birth.  
  
== Related Web Sites ==
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== Related Websites ==
  
[http://www.idph.state.il.us/vitalrecords/index.htm Illinois Department of Public Health]  
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*[http://www.idph.state.il.us/vitalrecords/index.htm Illinois Department of Public Health]  
 
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*[http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/databases/marriage.html Illinois Statewide Marriage Index]
A marriage index is found at the Illinois State Archives website: [http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/marriage.html http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/marriage.html]  
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== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
  
[[Illinois Vital Records|Illinois Vital Records]]  
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*[[Illinois|Illinois]]
 +
*[[Illinois Vital Records|Illinois Vital Records]]
  
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
Line 106: Line 112:
 
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
 
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
  
When you copy information from a record, you should also list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.  
+
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.  
 
+
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the Wiki Article: [[How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
+
 
+
==== Examples of Source Citations for a Record in This Collection  ====
+
 
+
"Illinois County Maarriages, 1810-1934." images, ''FamilySearch'' ([https://www.familysearch.org https://www.familysearch.org]): accessed 22 April 2011. entry for Claud Quincy and Ollie Koch, married 23 October 1901; citing Marriage Records, FHL microfilm 201,282; Brown County Courthouse, Mount Sterling, Illinois.
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== Sources of information for This Collection  ==
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<!--bibdescbegin-->Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934, images, ''FamilySearch'' ([http://familysearch.org http://familysearch.org]); from various archives throughout Illinois. FHL microfilm, Family History Library Salt Lake City, Utah<!--bibdescend-->
+
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].  
  
 
[[Category:Illinois|Vital]]
 
[[Category:Illinois|Vital]]

Revision as of 18:33, 16 May 2013

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

The collection consists of indexes and images of county marriages from the state of Illinois for the years 1810 to 1934. The records in this collection are for 57 counties. The type of record and the time period varies by county. Some counties also have a few birth records mixed in with the marriages.

Illinois marriage records included marriage registers and marriage licenses. Sometimes only one type of marriage record was preserved. Early county marriage records were handwritten into bound books with multiple entries to a page. These records provided little more than the date of marriage, names of the bride and groom, and the person who performed the marriage.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.

"Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934." Index. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.

Record Content

Key genealogical facts usually found in this collection contains the following:

  • Marriage date
  • Marriage place
  • Names of the bride and groom
  • Ages of the bride and groom
  • Names of witnesses
  • Name of the officiator who performed the marriage
  • Officiator’s title
  • Residence of bride and groom
  • License date and number
  • Recording date

How to Use the Record

To begin you search it is helpful to know the name of the person at the time of marriage and some other identifying information such as:

  • The county where the marriage occurred
  • The approximate marriage date
  • The name of the intended spouse

Search the Collection

To search the collection by name fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
  • Indexes may contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at FamilySearch Search Tips.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s marriage record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example:

  • Use the marriage date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.
  • Use the age to calculate an approximate birth date.
  • Use the birth date or age along with the residence to find the family in census records.
  • Use the residence to locate church and land records.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • Indexes may contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
  • The name of the officiator is a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county. However, ministers may have reported marriages performed in other counties.
  • Compile the marriage entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.
  • Continue to search the marriage records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives of the bride and groom who may have married in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.
  • Use the marriage number to identify previous marriages.
  • When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
  • The information in marriage records is usually reliable, but depends upon the reliability of the informant.
  • Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1800s.
  • There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Check for variant spellings of the surnames.
  • Search for the marriage record of the marriage partner if known.
  • Check for a different index. There are often indexes at the beginning of each volume.
  • Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.

Additional Information About These Records

By the mid-1800s the counties had preprinted register books. Starting in 1877, marriage register books provided columns for ages, residences, birth places, and sometimes the names of the parents or guardians of the bride and groom.

Marriage returns were reported by the minister or Justice of the Peace who performed the marriage. County histories can be checked to learn which religion and congregation a minister served. Ministers’ returns may reveal that the marriage took place in a private residence, often the home of a parent or relative.

The county clerk usually kept marriage records from the time the county was organized. The counties continue to record marriages to the present day and only county clerks can issue certified copies of the marriage certificate. A statewide register of marriages began in 1962 as county clerks forwarded marriage information to the Illinois Department of Health. If you do not know the county where a couple married after 1962, the Division of Vital Records may provide the marriage date and county.

Counties in Illinois recorded marriages to legalize marital relationships and to safeguard the interests of wives.

The marriage date, residence, and other facts that were current at the time the marriage occurred are quite reliable, though there is still a chance of misinformation. Other data such as age or birth place have more chance of error due to the lapse of time between marriage and birth.

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.