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Tribes and Bands of New Mexico

Acoma, Anasazi, Apache, Mescalero Apache, Mimbreno Apache, Chiricahua Apache, Comanche, Grants, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Jicarilla, Jicarilla Apache, Keresan, Kiowa, Kiowa Apache, Lipan, Monso, Mescaleros Apache, Mimbreno, Mimbus Apache, Navajo, Pecos, Piro, Pueblos, Pueblo, Shuman, Taos, Tewa, Ute, Southern Ute, Mountain Ute, Wiminuche, Zuni

Acoma-Pueblo, Canoncito-Navajo, Jemez-Pueblo, Jicarilla-Pueblo, Laguna-Pueblo, Taos-Pueblo

Reference

Hodge, Frederick Webb. Handbood of American Indians North of Mexico. Washington D.C.:Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethonology, Bulletin #30 1907.
Swanaton, John R. The Indian Tribes of North America (http://www.accessgenealogy.com ) Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ehtnology Bulletin #145.

Reservations

  • Alamo Reservation: Federal, under jurisdiction of _______ Tribe: Navajo
  • Black Rock Reservation: - Zuni tribe
  • Bosque Redondo Reservation:
  • Cononcita Reservation: Federal, under jurisdiction of ______, Tribe: Navajo
  • Jicarilla Reservation: Federal, under jurisdiction of Jicarilla Agency, Tribe: Jicarilla Apache
  • Mescalero Reservation: Federal, under jurisdiction of Mescalero Agency, Tribe: Apache
  • Navajo Reservation: Apache tribe
  • Ojo Caliente Reservation:
  • Puerto Cito Reservation: Alamo Navajo tribe
  • Ramah Reservation (Community): Federal, under jurisdiction of Ramah-Navajo Agency, Tribe: Navajo
  • Zuni Reservation: Federal, under jurisdiction of Zuni Agency, Tribe: Zuni

Reference

Isaacs, Katherine M., editor. Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America, U.S. Data Sourcebook., Volume 11 Appendices, Bureau of Indian Affairs. List of American Indian Reservations, Appendix E. Indian Reservations. Omnigraphics. Inc., 1991.

Pueblos

  • Acoma Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Keresan
  • Cochiti Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Kersan
  • Isleta Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Isleta
  • Jemez Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Jemez
  • Laguna Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Laguna Agency, Tribe Keresan
  • Nambe Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tewa
  • Picuris (San Lorenzo) Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tewa
  • Pajoaque Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tewa
  • Sandia Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tewa
  • San Felipe Pueblo - Federal, under juisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Keresan
  • San Ildefanso Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tewa
  • San Juan Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northenr Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tawo-Tewa
  • Santa Ana Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Keresan
  • Santa Clara Pueblo- Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tewa
  • Santo Domingo Pueblo -Federal, under jurisdiction of Southern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Leresan
  • Taos Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tigua
  • Tesuque Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of Northern Pueblos Agency, Tribe: Tano-Tewa
  • Zia Pueblo - Federal, under jurisdiction of  Southern pueblos Agency, Tribe: Keresan

Agencies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Agencies were created as an administrative division of the federal government to manage Indian affairs with the tribes, to enforce policies, and to assist in maintaining the peace. The names and location of these agencies may have changed, but their purpose remained basically the same. Many of the records of genealogical value were created by these offices.

Reference

Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. Clearwater Publishing Co., Inc., 1974.

Indian Schools

The Office of Indian Affairs (now the Bureau of Indian Affairs) established a network of schools throughout the United States, beginning with Carlisle Indian School, established in 1879. Some of these schools were day schools, usually focusing on Indian children of a single tribe or reservation. Some were boarding schools which served Indian children from a number of tribes and reservations.

In addition, other groups such as various church denominations established schools specifically focusing on American Indian children. (read more...)

Indian Health Facilities

Family History Library

The Family History Library has microfilm copies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs records of births, deaths, marriages, divorces, land allotments and homesteads, and school records and reports. The records were created between 1878 and 1944 at the Eastern Navajo, Jicarilla, Pueblos, Zuni, and other agencies. These original records for New Mexico are located at the National Archives—Rocky Mountain Region (Denver).

Records and information about the various tribes are also listed in the Subject Search of the Family History Library Catalog under the name of the tribe.

  • New Mexico Superintendency 1848-1880 T21 30 films 1st film 1617620

Other Repositories

  • Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1570 Pacheco St., Santa Fe, NM 87501

See Also:

New Mexico-Church for a list of missions. There were many Spanish Missions with Pueblos

New Mexico-History for a calendar of events

New Mexico-Military for a list of forts

Web Sites

The Rocky Mountain Regional Archives of the National Archives and Records Administration -- http://www.archives.gov/rocky-mountain/  

Native American Indian Census Rolls for New Mexico -- http://www.us-census.org/native/m595/new_mexico.html  

An 1869 study of "Native American Indians of New Mexico -- http://www.logoi.com/notes/newmexico/index.html  


 

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