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=== Emigrant Passenger Lists and Assorted Papers on Emigrant Shipping ''(Ryokaku Meibo to Imin Unsosen Mondai Zakken)'' ===
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[[Image:Amabe Clan genealogy.jpg|thumb|right|250x400px|<center>Genealogy of the Amabe Clan (海部氏系図, amabeshi keizu), the oldest extant Japanese family tree</center>]]
  
'''What they are:'''
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''[[Japan|Japan]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Japan_Emigration_and_Immigration|Emigration and Immigration]]''  
  
These records were generated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japanese Diplomacy office at the time when people emigrated from Japan. They cover the time period of 1868—1940. This is a very reliable source.
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'''Emigrant Passenger Lists and Assorted Papers on Emigrant Shipping ''(Ryokaku Meibo to Imin Unsosen Mondai Zakken)'''''
  
'''Use these records to:'''
+
=== What they are  ===
  
These records are used to identify the permanent domicile of the head of the household, which is helpful in obtaining the ''koseki''. These records are good linkage records. They are particularly helpful for American researchers who are trying to determine where their Japanese ancestor came from.
+
These records were generated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japanese Diplomacy office at the time when people emigrated from Japan. They cover the time period of 1868—1940. This is a very reliable source.  
  
[[Image:Japan page19.jpg|300x400px|Japan_page19]]
+
=== Use these records to  ===
  
It is almost impossible, however, to find information on these records because they are listed by the shipping company name and some of the destinations where people are going. If you search by the name of the author (Diplomacy Record Office), you will get a list of the records by title (for example, ''List of Workers Going to Hawaii''). These records are in Japanese. Ask someone who knows Japanese to help you search them by rolling through the microfilm one entry at a time. Once they are indexed, these records will be much easier to use.
+
These records are used to identify the permanent domicile of the head of the household, which is helpful in obtaining the ''koseki''. These records are good linkage records. They are particularly helpful for American researchers who are trying to determine where their Japanese ancestor came from.  
  
'''Content:'''
+
[[Image:Japan page19.jpg|right|450x340px|Japan_page19]]
  
* Lists of emigrant travelers
+
It is almost impossible, however, to find information on these records because they are listed by the shipping company name and some of the destinations where people are going. If you search by the name of the author (Diplomacy Record Office), you will get a list of the records by title (for example, ''List of Workers Going to Hawaii''). These records are in Japanese. Ask someone who knows Japanese to help you search them by rolling through the microfilm one entry at a time. Once they are indexed, these records will be much easier to use.
* Papers on emigration policies
+
* Business activities and agents
+
* Lists of emigrants who died abroad
+
* Passport applications
+
* Emigrant travel permits
+
* Passports issued
+
* Lists of names of Japanese emigrants, as well as fields on foreigners in Japan
+
  
The kind of information varies. Most include:
+
=== Content  ===
  
* Emigrants’ names, ages, and places of origin
+
*Lists of emigrant travelers
* Permanent domicile and temporary residence
+
*Papers on emigration policies
* Emigration dates, birth dates, and birth places
+
*Business activities and agents
* Destinations and passport numbers
+
*Lists of emigrants who died abroad
* Applications by Japanese abroad inquiring after the well-being of their families in Japan
+
*Passport applications
* Many provide specific birth dates and even marriages or death dates.
+
*Emigrant travel permits
 +
*Passports issued
 +
*Lists of names of Japanese emigrants, as well as fields on foreigners in Japan
  
'''How to obtain them:'''
+
The kind of information varies. Most include:  
  
The Family History Library has all of these records on microfilm.
+
*Emigrants’ names, ages, and places of origin
 +
*Permanent domicile and temporary residence
 +
*Emigration dates, birth dates, and birth places
 +
*Destinations and passport numbers
 +
*Applications by Japanese abroad inquiring after the well-being of their families in Japan
 +
*Many provide specific birth dates and even marriages or death dates.
  
=== Immigration Records (Passenger Lists and Ship Manifests in the Language of the Port Where They Arrived) ===
+
=== How to obtain them  ===
  
Immigration records must be searched by locality for lists. For example, search by California, San Francisco – Emigration and immigration records.
+
The Family History Library has all of these records on microfilm.
 +
 
 +
=== Immigration Records (Passenger Lists and Ship Manifests in the Language of the Port Where They Arrived) [[Image:75th anniv of Japanese emigration to Hawaii.JPG|thumb|right|250x220px|<center>75th Anniversary Stamp of Japanese Emigration to Hawaii</center>]]  ===
 +
 
 +
Immigration records must be searched by locality for lists. For example, search by California, San Francisco – Emigration and immigration records.  
 +
 
 +
Most incoming passenger arrival lists for the United States have been indexed and are available online at Ancestry.com ($), a subscription website, such as:<br>
 +
 
 +
*[http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1502 Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger Lists, 1900-1953] (a free index to these records is also available at {{RecordSearch|1913398|FamilySearch}})
 +
*[http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7949 California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1893-1957]
 +
 
 +
{{Japan}}
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{{featured article}}
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 +
[[Category:Japan]]

Latest revision as of 20:10, 12 December 2012

Genealogy of the Amabe Clan (海部氏系図, amabeshi keizu), the oldest extant Japanese family tree

Japan Gotoarrow.png Emigration and Immigration

Emigrant Passenger Lists and Assorted Papers on Emigrant Shipping (Ryokaku Meibo to Imin Unsosen Mondai Zakken)

Contents

What they are

These records were generated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japanese Diplomacy office at the time when people emigrated from Japan. They cover the time period of 1868—1940. This is a very reliable source.

Use these records to

These records are used to identify the permanent domicile of the head of the household, which is helpful in obtaining the koseki. These records are good linkage records. They are particularly helpful for American researchers who are trying to determine where their Japanese ancestor came from.

Japan_page19

It is almost impossible, however, to find information on these records because they are listed by the shipping company name and some of the destinations where people are going. If you search by the name of the author (Diplomacy Record Office), you will get a list of the records by title (for example, List of Workers Going to Hawaii). These records are in Japanese. Ask someone who knows Japanese to help you search them by rolling through the microfilm one entry at a time. Once they are indexed, these records will be much easier to use.

Content

  • Lists of emigrant travelers
  • Papers on emigration policies
  • Business activities and agents
  • Lists of emigrants who died abroad
  • Passport applications
  • Emigrant travel permits
  • Passports issued
  • Lists of names of Japanese emigrants, as well as fields on foreigners in Japan

The kind of information varies. Most include:

  • Emigrants’ names, ages, and places of origin
  • Permanent domicile and temporary residence
  • Emigration dates, birth dates, and birth places
  • Destinations and passport numbers
  • Applications by Japanese abroad inquiring after the well-being of their families in Japan
  • Many provide specific birth dates and even marriages or death dates.

How to obtain them

The Family History Library has all of these records on microfilm.

Immigration Records (Passenger Lists and Ship Manifests in the Language of the Port Where They Arrived)
75th Anniversary Stamp of Japanese Emigration to Hawaii

Immigration records must be searched by locality for lists. For example, search by California, San Francisco – Emigration and immigration records.

Most incoming passenger arrival lists for the United States have been indexed and are available online at Ancestry.com ($), a subscription website, such as:



 

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  • This page was last modified on 12 December 2012, at 20:10.
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