Jersey

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[[Image:Jersey flag.png|thumb|right|200px|Jersey flag.png]] The '''State of Jersey''' is a British Crown dependency off the coast of '''Normandy''', [[France|France]].
  
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As well as the main island of '''Jersey''', the states includes the nearly uninhabited islands of the '''Minquiers''', '''Écréhous''', the '''Pierres de Lecq''' and other rocks and reefs.
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(Add introductory text and/or an image here)
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== Getting started with Cambodia research  ==
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Historically, the islands have been under the control of Brittany, Normandy and France. The government, the '''Assembly of the States of Jersey''', came into existence in the 16th century but its origins go back to much earlier times.
  
Cambodia is divided into 3 municipalities [Keb, Penh and Preah Seihanu (Sihanoukville)] and 20 provinces; Banteay Mean Cheay, Batdambang, Kampong Cham, Kampong Chhnang, Kampong Spoe, Kampong Thum, Kampot, Kandal, Kaoh Kong, Krachen, Mondol Kiri, Otdar Mean Cheay, Pouthisat, Preah Vihear, Prey Veng, Rotanah Kiri, Siem Reab, Stoeng Treng, Svay Rieng, and Takev. However, most Cambodians consider themselves to be Khmers, descendants of the Angkor Empire that extended over much of Southeast Asia and reached its zenith between the 10th and 13th centuries. Cambodia became part of French Indochina in 1887. Following Japanese occupation in World War II, Cambodia gained full independence from France in 1953.  
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The capital is '''St. Helier'''. The population of Jersey at the 2011 Census was 97,857.  
  
== Jurisdictions  ==
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Together with the Bailiwick of [[Guernsey|Guernsey]] it forms the '''[[Channel Islands|Channel Islands]]'''.
  
(Your text or images here)
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Jersey is not part of the [[United Kingdom]]. Its membership of the&nbsp; European Union is governed by Protocol 3 of the UK’s Treaty of Accession to the European Community. In general terms, the effect of Protocol 3 is that EU rules on customs matters and quantitative restrictions apply to the Islands, but provisions relating to free movement of persons and services do not.
  
== Research Tools ==
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== Getting Started with Jersey Research  ==
  
*http://www.mekong.net/cambodia/index.htm
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The majority of records for family history research in Jersey are not online: critically the registrations of births, marriages and deaths after 1842 are only available in paper form from the Office of the Superintendent Registrar in St Helier - which means that any serious attempt at research will require either a visit or the services of locally-based researchers.  
*http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~royalty/cambodia/persons.html
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*http://www.camnet.com.kh/archives.cambodia/English/welcome.htm
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*http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.asia.cambodia/mb.ashx
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*http://www.adoptionmiracle.org/links.asp
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*(helpful tools and resources, gazetteers)
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However, this does not mean that there is no data at all out there...  
*(language dictionary, handwriting guide or tutorial, etc.)
+
  
== Help Wanted  ==
+
First and foremost there is census data: both Ancestry and Findmypast have copies of censuses from 1841 to 1911 online. Having said that, the OCR systems that they used to index the censuses do not cope terribly well with the rather unique challenges of Jersey personal and place names, so be prepared to think quite laterally about how you approach name searches.
  
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial" /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial">In order to make this wiki a better research tool, we need your help! Many tasks need to be done. You can help by:</span>
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A rather different (and later) form of census exists in Jersey Archive’s online public access catalogue (hereafter the [http://search.jerseyheritage.org/ Jersey OPAC]). The largest document set in it is the 30000-plus identity cards issues by the German occupation forces in 1941 – these have addresses, names and dates of birth.  
  
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Searching for a name in the Jersey OPAC is a lucky dip exercise – you can’t be sure what you will find. You might find records of a will – and that will have a date when it was enacted, which is a helpful guideline to where to start looking for a death. You might find property transactions, or names entered in school logbooks, or possibly baptisms. Definitely worth a try.
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*[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Edit_a_page Expand an article]or&nbsp;[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Special:Shortpages short page]
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*[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/How_to_author_an_article_in_the_Wiki Create a new article]
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*[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/How_to_categorize_an_article Categorize articles]
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There are military records. If you’re looking at Channel Island relatives who served in the First World War, it’s well worth investigating the website of the [http://www.greatwarci.net/ Channel Island Great War Study Group]. Their list is rather more complete than transcripts of what’s in the National Archives simply because Jersey residents served not only with the British armed forces but also with the Canadians and Australians. There were also at least a couple of thousand French nationals who joined up with the French military, but records for them are rather scanty. But it could be worth taking a look at the French government's [http://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/spip.php?page=sommaire&lang=en Memoire des Hommes] website.
  
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If you are looking at other periods (and bear in mind Jersey had a garrison to protect it from the French right up until the 1930s), you may find references to service in Jersey on the military records of Chelsea Pensioners kept on FindMyPast, or on the GRO Regimental Indexes of birth marriage and death.  
*[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Create_an_external_link Add external links to articles]
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*[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Create_an_internal_link Add internal links to articles]
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*Other...<div></div>
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There are scanned copies of Channel Island postal directories that may help to link a name to an address.
  
<br>
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You may also be fortunate enough to find online family trees. Ancestry host them, as do Genesreunited, and there are also numerous independently-produced web sites. The general rule of thumb is to treat these as a guideline: they may be inaccurate, or they may tell the truth as far the researcher knows it – but not the whole story.
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== Jurisdictions  ==
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Jersey is divided into twelve parishes. All have access to the sea and are named after the saints to whom their ancient parish churches are dedicated:
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*Grouville
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*Saint Brélade
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*Saint Clement
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*Saint Helier
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*Saint John
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*Saint Lawrence
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*Saint Martin
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*Saint Mary
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*Saint Ouen
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*Saint Peter
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*Saint Saviour
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*Trinity
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</div>
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These parishes are further divided into ''vingtaines'' (or, in the case of St. Ouen, ''cueillettes'').
 +
 
 +
== Research Tools  ==
 +
 
 +
*(helpful tools and resources, gazetteers)
 +
*(language dictionary, handwriting guide or tutorial, etc.)
  
 
== Featured Content  ==
 
== Featured Content  ==
  
(Your text or images here)
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*[[Jersey Parish Registers|Parish Registers]]
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*[[Jersey Civil Registration|Civil Registration]]
  
 
== Did you know?  ==
 
== Did you know?  ==
  
(Your text or images here, or use the table below:)  
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*Until the nineteenth century '''Jèrriais''', a variety of Norman French, was the language of the island, although French was used for official business. Although today Jersey is predominantly English-speaking, Jèrriais survives and there have been efforts to revive the language in schools.
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*The French writer '''Victor Hugo''' moved to Jersey in 1852 to escape the French government. He and his family lived near '''Le Dicq''' until he was expelled from the island in 1855 and sailed to Guernsey, before eventually returning to France.
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*The famous actress and socialite '''Lillie Langtry''' (1853-1929) was born at '''St Saviour''' where her father was the Dean. She is buried in St Saviour's churchyard.
  
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=== Useful Websites  ===
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*(Your Bullet)
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*(Your Bullet)
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*[http://www.jerseyfamilyhistory.org/ Channel Islands Family History Society]
*(Your Bullet)
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*[http://www.jerseyheritagetrust.jeron.je/archive.html Jersey Heritage Trust]
*(Your Bullet)
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*[http://www.societe-jersiaise.org/ Societe Jersiaise]
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*[http://www.statesassembly.gov.je/ The States Assembly]
  
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== Help Wanted  ==
*(Your Bullet)
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*(Your Bullet)
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|}
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In order to make this wiki a better research tool, we need your help! Many tasks need to be done. You can help by:
  
(All text below this is included in a column on the left side of the screen.)
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|-
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| style="background: rgb(238,238,238); font-family: verdana" align="center" | '''News and Events'''
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*[[Help:Editing a Page|Expand an article]] or [[Special:Shortpages|short page]]
*Current Events
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*[[Help:How to create an article|Create a new article]]
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*[[Help:Categorization|Categorize articles]]
  
more...
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*[[Help:Create an external link|Add external links to articles]]
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|-
| style="background: rgb(238,238,238); font-family: verdana" align="center" | '''Topics'''
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| align="center" style="background: none repeat scroll 0% 0% rgb(238, 238, 238); font-family: verdana;" | '''Topics'''
 
|-
 
|-
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| align="left" style="background: none repeat scroll 0% 0% rgb(249, 243, 253);" |  
*(Your Bullets here)
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*[[Jersey Archives and Libraries|Archives and Libraries]]
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*[[Jersey Cemeteries|Cemeteries]]
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*[[Jersey Census|Census]]
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*[[Jersey Church Records|Church Records]]
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*[[Jersey Civil Registration|Civil Registration]]
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*[[Jersey Directories|Directories]]
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*[[Jersey Emigration and Immigration|Emigration and Immigration]]
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*[[Jersey History|History]]
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*[[Jersey Languages|Languages]]
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*[[Jersey Maps|Maps]]
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*[[Jersey Merchant Marine|Merchant Marine]]
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*[[Jersey Names, Personal|Names Personal]]
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*[[Jersey Newspapers|Newspapers]]
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*[[Jersey Occupations|Occupations]]
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*[[Jersey Parish Registers|Parish Registers]]
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*[[Jersey Place Names|Place Names]]
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*[[Jersey Probate Records|Probate Records]]
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*[[Jersey Societies|Societies]]
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*[[Jersey Taxation|Taxation]]
  
|-
 
| style="background: rgb(238,238,238); font-family: verdana" align="center" | '''Useful Websites'''
 
|-
 
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*Websites
 
 
<br>
 
 
|}
 
</div>
 
 
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{{Forum badge
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[[Category:Channel_Islands]]
 
[[Category:Channel_Islands]]

Revision as of 21:45, 14 February 2013

Jersey flag.png
The State of Jersey is a British Crown dependency off the coast of Normandy, France.

As well as the main island of Jersey, the states includes the nearly uninhabited islands of the Minquiers, Écréhous, the Pierres de Lecq and other rocks and reefs.

Historically, the islands have been under the control of Brittany, Normandy and France. The government, the Assembly of the States of Jersey, came into existence in the 16th century but its origins go back to much earlier times.

The capital is St. Helier. The population of Jersey at the 2011 Census was 97,857.

Together with the Bailiwick of Guernsey it forms the Channel Islands.

Jersey is not part of the United Kingdom. Its membership of the  European Union is governed by Protocol 3 of the UK’s Treaty of Accession to the European Community. In general terms, the effect of Protocol 3 is that EU rules on customs matters and quantitative restrictions apply to the Islands, but provisions relating to free movement of persons and services do not.

Getting Started with Jersey Research

The majority of records for family history research in Jersey are not online: critically the registrations of births, marriages and deaths after 1842 are only available in paper form from the Office of the Superintendent Registrar in St Helier - which means that any serious attempt at research will require either a visit or the services of locally-based researchers.

However, this does not mean that there is no data at all out there...

First and foremost there is census data: both Ancestry and Findmypast have copies of censuses from 1841 to 1911 online. Having said that, the OCR systems that they used to index the censuses do not cope terribly well with the rather unique challenges of Jersey personal and place names, so be prepared to think quite laterally about how you approach name searches.

A rather different (and later) form of census exists in Jersey Archive’s online public access catalogue (hereafter the Jersey OPAC). The largest document set in it is the 30000-plus identity cards issues by the German occupation forces in 1941 – these have addresses, names and dates of birth.

Searching for a name in the Jersey OPAC is a lucky dip exercise – you can’t be sure what you will find. You might find records of a will – and that will have a date when it was enacted, which is a helpful guideline to where to start looking for a death. You might find property transactions, or names entered in school logbooks, or possibly baptisms. Definitely worth a try.

There are military records. If you’re looking at Channel Island relatives who served in the First World War, it’s well worth investigating the website of the Channel Island Great War Study Group. Their list is rather more complete than transcripts of what’s in the National Archives simply because Jersey residents served not only with the British armed forces but also with the Canadians and Australians. There were also at least a couple of thousand French nationals who joined up with the French military, but records for them are rather scanty. But it could be worth taking a look at the French government's Memoire des Hommes website.

If you are looking at other periods (and bear in mind Jersey had a garrison to protect it from the French right up until the 1930s), you may find references to service in Jersey on the military records of Chelsea Pensioners kept on FindMyPast, or on the GRO Regimental Indexes of birth marriage and death.

There are scanned copies of Channel Island postal directories that may help to link a name to an address.

You may also be fortunate enough to find online family trees. Ancestry host them, as do Genesreunited, and there are also numerous independently-produced web sites. The general rule of thumb is to treat these as a guideline: they may be inaccurate, or they may tell the truth as far the researcher knows it – but not the whole story.

Jurisdictions

Jersey is divided into twelve parishes. All have access to the sea and are named after the saints to whom their ancient parish churches are dedicated:

  • Grouville
  • Saint Brélade
  • Saint Clement
  • Saint Helier
  • Saint John
  • Saint Lawrence
  • Saint Martin
  • Saint Mary
  • Saint Ouen
  • Saint Peter
  • Saint Saviour
  • Trinity

These parishes are further divided into vingtaines (or, in the case of St. Ouen, cueillettes).

Research Tools

  • (helpful tools and resources, gazetteers)
  • (language dictionary, handwriting guide or tutorial, etc.)

Featured Content

Did you know?

  • Until the nineteenth century Jèrriais, a variety of Norman French, was the language of the island, although French was used for official business. Although today Jersey is predominantly English-speaking, Jèrriais survives and there have been efforts to revive the language in schools.
  • The French writer Victor Hugo moved to Jersey in 1852 to escape the French government. He and his family lived near Le Dicq until he was expelled from the island in 1855 and sailed to Guernsey, before eventually returning to France.
  • The famous actress and socialite Lillie Langtry (1853-1929) was born at St Saviour where her father was the Dean. She is buried in St Saviour's churchyard.

Useful Websites

Help Wanted

In order to make this wiki a better research tool, we need your help! Many tasks need to be done. You can help by:

Topics