Manitoba CensusEdit This Page

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The pre-1870 censuses of Manitoba (Red River Settlement) list the heads of households and some other information such as, age, religion, country of birth, married or widowed, number of sons and daughters, and agricultural data (for example, the number of livestock, the number of buildings, and the number of acres under cultivation). Almost all of these censuses were taken by the Hudson’s Bay Company. The Hudson’s Bay Company Archives at http://www.gov.mb.ca/chc/archives/hbca/ has censuses for the years 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, 1835, 1838, 1840, and 1843, and these are indexed. A microfilm copy for the first two hundred years of this company, 1670–1870, is on deposit at the National Archives of Canada and at the Family History Library.

The Provincial Archives of Manitoba at http://www.gov.mb.ca/chc/archives/ has censuses for the years 1832, 1833, 1838, 1840, 1843, 1846–1847, 1849, and 1856 (incomplete). These censuses are available on microfilm at the National Archives of Canada, the Family History Library, or at local Family History Centers.

The first census with names of each member of the household of Manitoba was taken in 1870. It includes names, ages, places of birth, religion, and citizenship. There is a surname index to this census. Censuses for Manitoba with names of each member of the household were also taken in 1881, 1891, and 1901.

These censuses are available on microfilm at the National Archives of Canada, the Family History Library, Family History Centers, and at many provincial archives and larger public libraries.

The 1885 and 1886 provincial censuses as well as the Canadian censuses from 1921 to the present are not available to the public, although catalogs and finding aids may be available.


 

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