Minsi Path

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=== History of the Minsi Path  ===
 
=== History of the Minsi Path  ===
  
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It was used by early European settlers as their population expanded through Pennsylvania.    
 
It was used by early European settlers as their population expanded through Pennsylvania.    
  
Today the trail is known as Bethlehem Pike. <ref>Wikipedia - Bethlehem Pike[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethlehem_Pike]</ref>  
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Today the trail is known as Bethlehem Pike. Bethlehem Pike is a historic 42.21 mi (67.93 km) long road in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, connecting Philadelphia and Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It began as a Native American path called the Minsi Trail which evolved into a colonial highway called the King's Road in the 1760s. Most of the route later became part of U.S. Route 309, now Pennsylvania Route 309.<ref>Wikipedia - Bethlehem Pike[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethlehem_Pike]</ref>  
  
 
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[[Category:US Migration Trails and Roads]]
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Revision as of 22:08, 4 March 2013

Back to Pennsylvania to New York

History of the Minsi Path

The Minsi Path was named after the Minsi Indians.  Like many other North American trails, its origin extends back into antiquity as a path used by Native Americans for thousands of years.

The trail extends from the Blue Mountains in Pennsylvania to land in the south.

It was used by early European settlers as their population expanded through Pennsylvania.  

Today the trail is known as Bethlehem Pike. Bethlehem Pike is a historic 42.21 mi (67.93 km) long road in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, connecting Philadelphia and Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It began as a Native American path called the Minsi Trail which evolved into a colonial highway called the King's Road in the 1760s. Most of the route later became part of U.S. Route 309, now Pennsylvania Route 309.[1]






  1. Wikipedia - Bethlehem Pike[1]