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National Archives at Philadelphia
File:Repository Building.jpg
Repository Building.jpg

Contents

Contact Information

E-mail:[1]  Philadelphia.archives@nara.gov

Address:[1]

900 Market Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
19107-4292
(Entrance on Chestnut Street,
between 9th and 10th St.)

Telephone:[1]  215-606-0100
Fax:  215-305-2038
Hours and holidays:[1] Monday through Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Second Saturday each month, 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Closed Sundays and Federal holidays.
Directions, maps, and public transportation:[2] The facility is located on the ground level of the Nix Federal Building. Enter on the Chestnut Street side between 9th and 10th Streets.

Subway: Market-Frankford Line. Exit at 8th Street.

Bus: Many SEPTA and NJ Transit buses stop in the vicinity. For routes that stop at the main entrance, SEPTA buses #9, #21, #38, and #42 stop at 9th Street and Chestnut.

Rail: All SEPTA regional rail lines and the New Jersey PATCO line have stations on Market Street between 8th and 11th.

Transit Contacts: SEPTA, Southeastern SEPTA, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, 215-580-7800

NJ Transit, New Jersey Transit, 973-762-5100

PATCO Speedline, Delaware River Port Authority of Pennsylvania and New Jersey (DRPA), (856) 772-6900

Car: From the north: I-95 south to Exit 22 (I-676 West/ Independence Hall/Callowhill St. exit), right on Callowhill St. at bottom of ramp. Left on 6th St. to Walnut St. Right on Walnut to 9th. Right on 9th to Chestnut St.

From the south: I-95 north to Exit 22. Left at 6th St. and proceed as above.

From the east: Benjamin Franklin Bridge to 6th St. Proceed as above.

From the west: I-76 to Exit 344 (I-676 East). I-676 east to 8th St./Chinatown exit. Right on 8th to Walnut. Right on Walnut to 9th. Right on 9th.

There is pay parking in the vicinity.

Internet sites and databases:

Collection Description

{Please briefly describe the strengths and weaknesses of each collection for genealogists (about two or three sentences for smaller collections).[3] For example, explain the collection size, who (which ethnic, political, or religious groups) are covered, dates covered, jurisdictions covered, record types available, significant indexes, and any noteworthy record loss or gaps.[4]}

Tips

{Optional}

Guides

{Optional: Internet or guide books describing this collection for genealogists. }

  • Loretto Dennis Szucs, and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking, The Archives: A Guide to the National Archives Field Branches (Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1988), 32-34. (FHL Book 977 A3sz) WorldCat entry. Describes each field branch collection, microfilms, services and activities. Each of 150 record groups of the archives is also described.

Alternate Repositories

{ List (link to a Wiki article for) at least one or more other repositories that collect overlapping records, or similar family history material including central repositories, affiliated or branch repositories, higher level jurisdiction repositories, parent or daughter jurisdiction repositories. Also list neighboring repositories with similar records. Please briefly explain how each substitute repository is related.}

If you cannot visit or find a source at the National Archives at Philadelphia, a similar source may be available at one of the following.

Overlapping Collections

  • Alternate Repository {create link for each, and give line or two describing collection}

Similar Collections



Neighboring Collections


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Source 1.
  2. Directions at the National Archives Mid-Atlantic Region] (accessed 25 September 2012).
  3. Source 2.
  4. Source 3.

 

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