Norfolk, Vermont

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''[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Vermont|Vermont]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Essex County, Vermont|Essex]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]'' '''Norfolk'''  
 
''[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Vermont|Vermont]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Essex County, Vermont|Essex]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]'' '''Norfolk'''  
  
'''Norfolk&nbsp;''' is an extinct town formerly in the northeastern-most corner of Vermont (and also included some land in what is now New Hampshire). Norfolk was established by Vermont on 27 February 1782 in what for a few months was Orange County. However, on 5 November 1782 Essex County was created, and thereafter included the town of Norfolk.<ref>Esther Munroe Swift, ''Vermont Place-Names: Footprints of History'' (Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Press, 1997), 195, and 205.</ref> In 1801 less-viable Norfolk was annexed to [[Canaan, Vermont]].<ref>Michael J. Leclerc, ''Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research'', 5th ed. (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), 395. {{WorldCat|779626228|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1967587|item|disp=FHL Book 974 D27g 2012}}.</ref> <ref>[http://all-ancestors.com/vermonttowns/vermontn.htm Land Grants That Became the Towns of Vermont - N] at ''All Ancestors'' (Internet site)(accessed 3 April 2013).</ref> In its charter Norfolk "Town" was also identified as a gore, and is still known in Canaan as "The Gore." For years Vermont and New Hampshire contested who owned this land because it is east of the Connecticut River. In 1934 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled it belongs to Vermont. Beecher Falls is a modern village and Canadian border crossing station within the former town of Norton.<ref>Swift, 205-206.</ref>  
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'''Norfolk&nbsp;''' is an extinct town formerly in the northeastern-most corner of Vermont (and also included some land in what is now New Hampshire). Norfolk was established by Vermont on 27 February 1782 in what for a few months was Orange County. However, on 5 November 1782 Essex County was created, and thereafter included the town of Norfolk.<ref>Esther Munroe Swift, ''Vermont Place-Names: Footprints of History'' (Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Press, 1997), 195, and 205. {{WorldCat|2644095|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|84313|item|disp=FHL Book 974.3 E2s}}.</ref> In 1801 less-viable Norfolk was annexed to [[Canaan, Vermont]].<ref>Michael J. Leclerc, ''Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research'', 5th ed. (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), 395. {{WorldCat|779626228|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1967587|item|disp=FHL Book 974 D27g 2012}}.</ref> <ref>[http://all-ancestors.com/vermonttowns/vermontn.htm Land Grants That Became the Towns of Vermont - N] at ''All Ancestors'' (Internet site)(accessed 3 April 2013).</ref> In its charter Norfolk "Town" was also identified as a gore, and is still known in Canaan as "The Gore." For years Vermont and New Hampshire contested who owned this land because it is east of the Connecticut River. In 1934 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled it belongs to Vermont. Beecher Falls is a modern village and Canadian border crossing station within the former town of Norton.<ref>Swift, 205-206.</ref>  
  
 
'''Records.''' For information about former residents from 1782-1801 of the part of '''Norfolk''' still in Vermont, try searching records of [[Canaan, Vermont]]. Canaan town meeting records, 1796-1903, are preserved at the Vermont Public Records Division in Montpelier, Vermont. A microfilm copy is available from the Family History Libray on {{FHL|154129|title-id|disp=film 865422 Items 3-6}}. Other types of records also exist for Canaan.  
 
'''Records.''' For information about former residents from 1782-1801 of the part of '''Norfolk''' still in Vermont, try searching records of [[Canaan, Vermont]]. Canaan town meeting records, 1796-1903, are preserved at the Vermont Public Records Division in Montpelier, Vermont. A microfilm copy is available from the Family History Libray on {{FHL|154129|title-id|disp=film 865422 Items 3-6}}. Other types of records also exist for Canaan.  

Revision as of 20:53, 10 April 2013

United States Gotoarrow.png Vermont Gotoarrow.png Essex Gotoarrow.png Norfolk

Norfolk  is an extinct town formerly in the northeastern-most corner of Vermont (and also included some land in what is now New Hampshire). Norfolk was established by Vermont on 27 February 1782 in what for a few months was Orange County. However, on 5 November 1782 Essex County was created, and thereafter included the town of Norfolk.[1] In 1801 less-viable Norfolk was annexed to Canaan, Vermont.[2] [3] In its charter Norfolk "Town" was also identified as a gore, and is still known in Canaan as "The Gore." For years Vermont and New Hampshire contested who owned this land because it is east of the Connecticut River. In 1934 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled it belongs to Vermont. Beecher Falls is a modern village and Canadian border crossing station within the former town of Norton.[4]

Records. For information about former residents from 1782-1801 of the part of Norfolk still in Vermont, try searching records of Canaan, Vermont. Canaan town meeting records, 1796-1903, are preserved at the Vermont Public Records Division in Montpelier, Vermont. A microfilm copy is available from the Family History Libray on film 865422 Items 3-6. Other types of records also exist for Canaan.

For information about former residents from the part of Norfolk now in New Hampshire, see Stewartstown and Clarksville records.

Adjacent towns: Canaan | New Hampshire: Coös County:  Clarksville | Pittsburg | Stewartstown | Québec: Compton-Stanstead County:  East Hereford | Saint-Herménégilde


References

  1. Esther Munroe Swift, Vermont Place-Names: Footprints of History (Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Press, 1997), 195, and 205. At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 974.3 E2s.
  2. Michael J. Leclerc, Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research, 5th ed. (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012), 395. At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 974 D27g 2012.
  3. Land Grants That Became the Towns of Vermont - N at All Ancestors (Internet site)(accessed 3 April 2013).
  4. Swift, 205-206.