Book and Film Numbers Used by the Family History Library

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=== Introduction  ===
 
=== Introduction  ===
  
The Family History Library has used a few different way to number films and books since the library started in 1894.&nbsp; These numbers are now mostly found on old family group sheets for the sources for the data on the sheets.&nbsp;These old numbers for books and films are no longer used, so the current numbers for the books and films must be found.&nbsp; <br>
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The Family History Library has used a few different way to number films and books since the library started in 1894.&nbsp; These numbers are now mostly found on old family group sheets for the sources for the data on the sheets.&nbsp;These old numbers for books and films are no longer used, so the current numbers for the books and films must be found.&nbsp; <br>  
  
There were three old numbering systems for books and three old numbering systems for films.&nbsp; The tools to find the current numbers are at the Family History Library.
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There were three old numbering systems for books and three old numbering systems for films.&nbsp; After determining if you have an old film number or an old book number, click on one of following for instructions on how to find the current number:
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• [[Converting Old FHL Film Numbers to Current Numbers|Introduction Converting Old FHL Film Numbers to Current Numbers]]&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
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*[[:Category:Old_microfilm_number_conversion|Chart&nbsp;for converting old film numbers]]
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•{{FHL|105840|title-id|disp=Converting Old FHL Book Numbers to Current Numbers}}
  
 
=== Old Film Numbers  ===
 
=== Old Film Numbers  ===
  
==== 1.&nbsp; First numbering System ====
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==== 1.&nbsp; First numbering System ====
  
 
The first numbering system for films used F (for film), then FH (for family history) or a geographic code, then a number or a letter and number and&nbsp;often a part number.&nbsp; A part number meant a separate film in a film collection.&nbsp; Examples:  
 
The first numbering system for films used F (for film), then FH (for family history) or a geographic code, then a number or a letter and number and&nbsp;often a part number.&nbsp; A part number meant a separate film in a film collection.&nbsp; Examples:  
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F Vt. W 25a pt. 2&nbsp;  
 
F Vt. W 25a pt. 2&nbsp;  
  
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==== 2.&nbsp; Second numbering system ====
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==== 2.&nbsp; Second numbering system ====
  
 
The second numbering system used a number with&nbsp;often a part number.&nbsp; These numbers were also called "red numbers" because the numbers were printed in red ink on the film boxes.&nbsp;&nbsp;Again a&nbsp;part number meant a separate film in a film collection.&nbsp; Examples:  
 
The second numbering system used a number with&nbsp;often a part number.&nbsp; These numbers were also called "red numbers" because the numbers were printed in red ink on the film boxes.&nbsp;&nbsp;Again a&nbsp;part number meant a separate film in a film collection.&nbsp; Examples:  
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2745  
 
2745  
  
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The tricky part of this system is it is hard to know if the number is an old, red number or a current number if the red number does not&nbsp;have a part number.&nbsp; Old, red numbers stopped about 8000, so any past that should be current numbers.
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The tricky part of this system is it is hard to know if the number is an old, red number or a current number if the red number does not&nbsp;have a part number.&nbsp; Old, red numbers stopped about 8000, so any past that should be current numbers.  
  
==== 3.&nbsp; Third numbering system ====
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==== 3.&nbsp; Third numbering system ====
  
The current numbering system started over with 1 and new films are assigned the next sequential number.&nbsp; No letters or part numbers are used.&nbsp; Zeros are sometimes put in front, but they are not needed.&nbsp; For example:  
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The current numbering system started over with 1 and new films are assigned the next sequential number. No letters or part numbers are used. Zeros are sometimes put in front, but they are not needed. For example:  
  
 
0000001  
 
0000001  
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490682  
 
490682  
  
2087254  
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2087254<br>
  
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=== To determine what the current number for an old or a red number:  ===
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==== Step 1<br> ====
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Find the old number in the following films or in green books called Microfilm Numbers (List of All Film Call Numbers in the Genealogical Society from 1938-1958).&nbsp; These are arranged by the first film numbers and give the second (red) numbers.&nbsp; <br>
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==== Step 2<br> ====
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With the red number:
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1.&nbsp; Go to the DOS version of the Family History Library Catalog,
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2.&nbsp; Select Film/Fiche Search.
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3.&nbsp; Type C.
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4.&nbsp; Type the old (red) film number.
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5.&nbsp; Type the part number if applicable.
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6.&nbsp; The current film number will be shown under Converted to Film Number.
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=== Films with the Old Film Numbers List&nbsp;(Old Locality Film Shelf List):  ===
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Current&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Old Film Numbers Film #s
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470962&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F F.H. 1-2207
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&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F Gen. Hist. 1-11
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&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F Am. Pub. A to F Fla. S2
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470963&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F Ga. pt. 1 to F La. W2a
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470964&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F Me. 1 to F N.C. Y2 <br>
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470965&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F N.D. 1 to F Vt. W37a <br>
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470966&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F Va. Pub. A to F Wyo W2
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Example:<br>If you found an old number F Vt. W 25a pt. 2, in the green books (or on film), you would find that the red number was 7079.&nbsp; The part number (pt. 2) would stay the same for the red number.&nbsp; Then go to the old Dos version of the Family History Library Catalog.
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Why to use [this record]
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Before searching you must know
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=== Where to get [this record]  ===
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How to search or use [this record]
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=== [An image of the record]  ===
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=== Reliability of [this record]  ===
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Tips
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=== Important Dates  ===
 
=== Important Dates  ===
  
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=== See Also  ===
 
=== See Also  ===
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Introduction_to_the_Family_History_Library_Catalog Introduction to the Family History Library Catalog]  
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[[Introduction to the Family History Library Catalog|Introduction to the Family History Library Catalog]]
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[[Family History Library Catalog Place Search|Family History Library Catalog Place Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Place_Search Family History Library Catalog Place Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Surname Search|Family History Library Catalog Surname Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Surname_Search Family History Library Catalog Surname Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Keyword Search|Family History Library Catalog Keyword Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Keyword_Search Family History Library Catalog Keyword Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Title Search|Family History Library Catalog Title Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Title_Search Family History Library Catalog Title Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Film or Fiche Search|Family History Library Catalog Film and Fiche Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Film_or_Fiche_Search Family History Library Catalog Film and Fiche Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Author Search|Family History Library Catalog Author Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Author_Search Family History Library Catalog Author Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Subject Search|Family History Library Catalog Subject Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Subject_Search Family History Library Catalog Subject Search]  
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[[Family History Library Catalog Call Number Search|Family History Library Catalog Call Number Search]]  
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Family_History_Library_Catalog_Call_Number_Search Family History Library Catalog Call Number Search]
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[[Category:Old_microfilm_number_conversion]] [[Category:Family_History_Library]]

Revision as of 03:15, 15 November 2012

Contents

Introduction

The Family History Library has used a few different way to number films and books since the library started in 1894.  These numbers are now mostly found on old family group sheets for the sources for the data on the sheets. These old numbers for books and films are no longer used, so the current numbers for the books and films must be found. 

There were three old numbering systems for books and three old numbering systems for films.  After determining if you have an old film number or an old book number, click on one of following for instructions on how to find the current number:

Introduction Converting Old FHL Film Numbers to Current Numbers   

Converting Old FHL Book Numbers to Current Numbers

Old Film Numbers

1.  First numbering System

The first numbering system for films used F (for film), then FH (for family history) or a geographic code, then a number or a letter and number and often a part number.  A part number meant a separate film in a film collection.  Examples:

F F.H. 441

F Ga. 7

F Me. 11 pt. 289

F Pa. C 9f pt. 1

F Mass. H3

F N.Y. C 16b

F Vt. W 25a pt. 2 


2.  Second numbering system

The second numbering system used a number with often a part number.  These numbers were also called "red numbers" because the numbers were printed in red ink on the film boxes.  Again a part number meant a separate film in a film collection.  Examples:

1448

1379 pt. 4

2756 pt. 356

7079 pt. 2

2745


The tricky part of this system is it is hard to know if the number is an old, red number or a current number if the red number does not have a part number.  Old, red numbers stopped about 8000, so any past that should be current numbers.

3.  Third numbering system

The current numbering system started over with 1 and new films are assigned the next sequential number. No letters or part numbers are used. Zeros are sometimes put in front, but they are not needed. For example:

0000001

4821

20589

490682

2087254


Important Dates


See Also

Introduction to the Family History Library Catalog

Family History Library Catalog Place Search

Family History Library Catalog Surname Search

Family History Library Catalog Keyword Search

Family History Library Catalog Title Search

Family History Library Catalog Film and Fiche Search

Family History Library Catalog Author Search

Family History Library Catalog Subject Search

Family History Library Catalog Call Number Search