Perth Nonconformist Church Records

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=== Roman Catholic Church  ===
 
=== Roman Catholic Church  ===
  
'''History—'''<br>This church was founded in 1821 but was served first from Stobhall until 1823 then from Dundee. The first resident priest was installed in 1830.  
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'''History—'''<br>This church was founded in 1821 but was served first from Stobhall until 1823 then from Dundee. The first resident priest was installed in 1830.&nbsp;It is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.  
  
'''Records—'''<br>Baptisms 1831–1856<br>Marriages 1833–1856<br>'''Note:''' Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record RH21/41.  
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'''Records—'''<br>Baptisms 1831–1856<br>Marriages 1833–1856<br>'''Note:'''&nbsp; Now available online for a fee at&nbsp;[http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk], record RH21/41.
  
 
=== The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints  ===
 
=== The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints  ===
  
 
'''Records— '''<br>Family History Library&nbsp;Film Number<br>Record of Members 1847–1853 [http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=filmhitlist&columns=*%2C0%2C0&filmno=0104155 0104155] item 6
 
'''Records— '''<br>Family History Library&nbsp;Film Number<br>Record of Members 1847–1853 [http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=filmhitlist&columns=*%2C0%2C0&filmno=0104155 0104155] item 6

Revision as of 17:12, 15 October 2009

Scotland Gotoarrow.png Perthshire Gotoarrow.png Perth

Here is a list of the pre-1855 nonconformist churches in Perth with information on their histories and records.  Seceders are Presbyterian groups who broke from the Established Church and Dissenters are groups who were of a different denomination.

Contents

Seceders

First Secession South, later Wilson United Presbyterian Church

History—
This congregation originated in the secession of the minister of Perth from the Established Church in 1733. A great majority of his congregation adhered to him, and large numbers were speedily added to it from the surrounding parishes. In 1740 a place of worship was erected. At the "Breach" in 1747, part of the congregation adhered to the Associate Burgher Synod and retained the property. The other part of the congregation adhered with the minister to the General Associate Anti-burgher Synod and took possession of the North Secession church, see the history of that church. In 1800, the minister separated from the Associate Synod along with part of his congregation and formed the Original Associate Burgher Synod, Old Light Burghers. This situation continued until 1819 when the question of which group had right to the possession of the church was finally settled in court, and the original associate group withdrew. This latter group (see Kinnoull Street Old Light Burghers below) reunited with the Established Church of Scotland in 1839, while the former became United Secession in 1820 and United Presbyterian in 1847.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Baptismal Register 1748–1962
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1284/36.

North General Associate Anti-burgher Church

History—
This congregation originated 1747 with the separation of the minister and the minority of the First Secession Church who adhered to the General Associate Anti-burgher Synod while the majority adhered to the Associate Burgher Synod and retained the property. A church was built in 1749. A second was built in 1792 with seating for 1404.
At the union of the two great branches of the Secession in 1820, the minister protested the union and withdrew with a portion of the members, and with them formed another congregation, Old Light Anti-burghers or Original Secession.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Family History Library Film Number
North Church:
Baptisms 1740–1854 0889486 item 1 X
Marriages 1740–1741, 1778–1786 0889486 item 1 X
Note: The X means records have been extracted.
Other:
Minutes 1739–1906
Manager Minutes 1781–1839
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/507.

Original Secession Church

Minutes 1831–1840, 1919–1928
Accounts 1845–1914
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/966.

Craigend Anti-burgher United Presbyterian Church

History—
Craigend is a village in the East parish of Perth, 3 miles south of the city center. This congregation originated with members of the congregation of Abernethy and the North Antiburgher congregation of Perth who were desirous of having a place of worship in their own connection more conveniently situated for them. Their church was built in 1780. This congregation became United Secession in 1820 and United Presbyterian in 1846.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Baptismal Register 1827–1852
Various Minutes 1783–1974
Collections 1785
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/415.

East, First Relief Church

History—
Two ministers were sent by the Relief Synod on a mission tour to the north in 1785. They found a number of persons connected with the Established Church, who were favorably disposed towards the Relief Synod, to whom they preached. Soon after they applied for and obtained supply of sermon from the Relief Presbytery of Dysart. A church was built in 1786, and a new church opened in 1863. In 1837, the church was stated to seat 902 persons.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Session Minutes 1806–1911
Manager’s Minutes 1798–1829
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/366.

Canal Street Relief Church, later United Presbyterian, extinct

History—
This congregation originated with a minority of the First Relief, now the East congregation, who preferred another candidate to the one elected by the majority in 1807. In order to obtain this person, they formed a separate congregation. In 1816 they moved to a chapel on Canal Street. In 1818 they took possession of the Independent Chapel on Canal Street. In 1851 the chapel was sold back to an Independent congregation, and the members, who had adhered to the United Presbyterian Church, dispersed themselves among other congregations in the town and this one became extinct.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.

Kinnoull Street Old Light, later Free Church, extinct

History—
This congregation, originally Old Light, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, and "came out" with their minister in 1843. When the minister retired in 1870, the congregation was discontinued and the members joined other churches.
Membership: 1848, 139; 1870, 66.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Minutes 1838–1869
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/767.

Perth Presbytery of Original Seceders

Records—
Minutes 1843–1940
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1401.

St. Leonard's Free Church

History—
John Milne, minister of St. Leonard's Church Extension charge, with most of his office bearers, and the bulk of his people, "came out" at the Disruption. They worshiped in the North Secession Church, afterwards known as the Wilson Church, and the Original Secession Church, until their own church was ready for occupation in October 1843. School buildings and a manse were also provided. A new church was erected in Marshall Place in 1885.
Membership: 1848, 900; 1900, 648.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Minutes 1836–1844, 1858–1877
Deacons Court Minutes 1844–1882
Accounts 1845–1877
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/545.

St. Stephen's Free Church

History—
The minister and almost the entire congregation of the Gaelic church "came out" in 1843. After a few weeks they were deprived of the church and met for worship first in the Guild Hall and then in a church on Kinnoul Street, which later became part of Messrs. Pullar's works. The church in New Row was erected in 1846, and the manse in 1852. A new church was built in 1878, the old church passing to St. Paul's congregation. The name was changed to St. Stephen's in 1886, when the Gaelic service was discontinued. From that date on the membership steadily increased.
Membership: 1848, 240; 1900, 724.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols, pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.
Records—
Minutes 1843–1914
Communion Roll 1852–1923
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/697.

Middle Free Church

History—
The minister of the Middle Parish Church and the majority of his congregation "came out" at the Disruption. They worshiped in the old Wesleyan Church, South Street, until their own church was opened in October 1843. A new church was erected on North Tay Street in 1887.
Membership: 1848, 715; 1900, 641.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Baptisms 1845–1878, 1782–1784
Marriages 1845–1880
Note:
Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1283.

West Free Church

History—
The minister of the West Church and the great majority of the congregation "came out" in 1843. They worshiped in the Independent Chapel until their own church in Glover's Yard was ready for occupation. A new church, with halls, etc., was erected on Tay Street in 1871.
Membership: 1848, 773; 1900, 803.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols, pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
The extent of pre-1855 records is unknown.

Dissenters

Perth Glasite Church

History—
John Glas (1695–1773) was the minister of Tealing parish and was suspended from his pulpit because of his radical teachings. He set up a church in Dundee whose members became known as Glasites. In 1733 they built their first meeting house in Perth. Other churches followed in Scotland and England. His son-n-law, Robert Sandeman, exported the faith to America where its followers became known as Sandemanians.
Source: The Internet at www.dundee.ac.uk/archives/ms009.htm.

Records—
Correspondence 1790–1896
Exhortations 1848–1877
List of Church Members in the United Kingdom and North America c.1762–1856
Records of Glasite congregations throughout Britain, particularly Edinburgh and London
Note: Available in manuscript form at the Dundee University Archives, Dundee, Scotland.

Independent Congregational Churches

History—
The first Congregational minister in Perth served for eighteen months beginning in October 1794, and a chapel was purchased for worship. It was called Paul Street Chapel. A congregation was not formed until 1798. Shortly after, they moved into a newly-built Tabernacle on South Street. In 1809 two of the lay pastors, and about twenty members, left the church, and formed a Baptist congregation. The Congregational group was eventually evicted from the Tabernacle by the Baptists and a new chapel was built on Canal Crescent in 1810. In 1824 they moved to a newly-built and larger place of worship on Mill Street. In 1896, this church united with the Perth Evangelical Union Church, formed in 1856, to form the Congregation Church of Perth. In 1851, a new church was formed in Canal Crescent by members of the Mill Street church. It was never a strong congregation and it closed in 1872.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. Family History Library book 941 K2es. Further details are given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of pre-1855 records is unknown. For information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX
Scotland

Baptist Churches

History—
Our source for the history of Baptist churches does not include the Tabernacle church, mentioned in the history of the Congregationalists above. We have no other history for this church. Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary of Scotland for 1846/51 states that there were Baptist and General Baptist places of worship in Perth.
Baptists were included among Cromwell’s troops posted to Perth during the last 17th century. Again in 1784 there were Baptists meeting and witnessing in Perth. But it was not until the Haldane brothers converted from Congregationalist to Baptist beliefs in 1808 that a church was constituted with twelve members. Two years later it consisted of eighty members with four elders, four deacons, and two preachers. They met in the Tailors’ Hall, High Street. In 1830, they built a church on South Street, with seating for about 200. In 1891 new premises were purchased.
Source: History of the Baptists in Scotland, by Rev. George Yuille, pub. 1926. Family Hisotry Library book 941 K2hi. More details may be given in the sources including list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to
Baptist Union of Scotland
12 Aytoun Road
Glasgow G41 5RT
Scotland

Perth Wesleyan Methodist Church

History—
A congregation was formed and a place of worship was purchased in 1814 and rebuilt the following year. They later moved to another location. This society was still in existence in 1947.
Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to one of these:
Perth Methodist Church Methodist Archives and Research Centre
Scott St, John Rylands University Library of Manchester
Perth PH2 8LU 150 Deansgate
Scotland Manchester M3 3EH
England

Perth Episcopal Churches

History—
The History is unavailable.

Records—
St. John the Baptist: 1802–1984: registers include baptisms, burials and services, accounts, plans and photos, miscellaneous finance papers, correspondence, minutes and records of St Andrew's chapel and school.1834–1963: Minute books, reports, legal papers etc.
St. Ninian's Cathedral: 1846–1984: registers include, baptisms, marriages and burials, minutes, accounts, plans, drawings and photos, miscellaneous papers including annual reports.19th century, 20th century deeds, minute books and miscellaneous records.
Note: Available in private collection. Make enquiries to:
National Register of Archives Scotland
HM General Register House
Edinburgh EH1 3YYScotland

Roman Catholic Church

History—
This church was founded in 1821 but was served first from Stobhall until 1823 then from Dundee. The first resident priest was installed in 1830. It is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.

Records—
Baptisms 1831–1856
Marriages 1833–1856
Note:  Now available online for a fee at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, record RH21/41.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Records—
Family History Library Film Number
Record of Members 1847–1853 0104155 item 6