Polish Parish Extraction Project

From FamilySearch Wiki

(Difference between revisions)
m
m (typo)
Line 13: Line 13:
 
SAMOCICE, with Laka Samocka, was once known as " Samszyce " in the 15th century. It is a village in the county of Dabrowa Tarnowska, and lies in the lowland on the right bank of the Wisla ( Vistula ) river. The parish church is located in Boleslaw. In the late 1800's the district had 172 houses with 974 inhabtants, of whom 942 were Catholics and 32 were Isrealis.  
 
SAMOCICE, with Laka Samocka, was once known as " Samszyce " in the 15th century. It is a village in the county of Dabrowa Tarnowska, and lies in the lowland on the right bank of the Wisla ( Vistula ) river. The parish church is located in Boleslaw. In the late 1800's the district had 172 houses with 974 inhabtants, of whom 942 were Catholics and 32 were Isrealis.  
  
The large estate belonging to count Art. Potocki, covered 20 morgen of farms,3 morgen of pastures, and 11 morgen of forests. Another large farmstead covered 747 mr. of farmland, 137 mr. 137 mr. of meadows, and 90 mr. of pastureland. According to Siarczynski, as per documents found in the Ossolinski Biblioeka, dating back to 1424, Samocice was granted governing laws and rights, based on a German governing method.  
+
The large estate belonging to count Art. Potocki, covered 20 morgen of farms,3 morgen of pastures, and 11 morgen of forests. Another large farmstead covered 747 mr. of farmland, 137 mr. 137 mr. of meadows, and 90 mr. of pastureland. According to Siarczynski, as per documents found in the Ossolinski Biblioteka, dating back to 1424, Samocice was granted governing laws and rights, based on a German governing method.  
  
 
In the 15th century, Samocice was in the parish of Boleslaw, and was the property of the royal house of Poland. There were five large fields allocated to private farmers.  
 
In the 15th century, Samocice was in the parish of Boleslaw, and was the property of the royal house of Poland. There were five large fields allocated to private farmers.  

Revision as of 06:41, 4 August 2010

Extensive extraction of Catholic Church records for the parishes of Medrzechow, Kupienin and Samocice, Poland have been completed and are available through the Family History Library. The records contain the following:

Medrzechow: births, deaths and marriages 1785 through 1901 extracted from films # 1895996 items 2 - 14 and 1895997 item 1 - 5

Kupienin: births, deaths and mariages 1785 through 1901 extracted from the same fim numbers.

Samocice: births, deaths and marriage film # 1895995 items 9 - 12, extracted database available on the computers at the Salt Lake Family History library or CD  ROM

Description of the village of Samocice: translated by Helen C. Bienick, translator of the polish Genealogical Society of California.

From the Slownik Geograficzny ( 1880 - 1902  )

SAMOCICE, with Laka Samocka, was once known as " Samszyce " in the 15th century. It is a village in the county of Dabrowa Tarnowska, and lies in the lowland on the right bank of the Wisla ( Vistula ) river. The parish church is located in Boleslaw. In the late 1800's the district had 172 houses with 974 inhabtants, of whom 942 were Catholics and 32 were Isrealis.

The large estate belonging to count Art. Potocki, covered 20 morgen of farms,3 morgen of pastures, and 11 morgen of forests. Another large farmstead covered 747 mr. of farmland, 137 mr. 137 mr. of meadows, and 90 mr. of pastureland. According to Siarczynski, as per documents found in the Ossolinski Biblioteka, dating back to 1424, Samocice was granted governing laws and rights, based on a German governing method.

In the 15th century, Samocice was in the parish of Boleslaw, and was the property of the royal house of Poland. There were five large fields allocated to private farmers.

The rector of the parish in Boleslaw was given the proceeds of the Christmas collection. One tenth of the sheaf crops was paid to the bishop of Krakow according to the book  " Liber Beneficiorum " Volume II, pages 433 - 435, written by historian Dlugosz.

Samocice borders Kanna and Boleslaw on the east, on the south lie Podlipie and Zalipie and Greboszowska Wola on the west.

Author: John Walter Dudek