Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina

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== History  ==
 
== History  ==
 
South Carolina's "Anglican parishes were used as election districts and had responsibility for road development, care of the poor, and education."<ref>[http://archives.sc.gov/formation/ "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina,"] at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.</ref>
 
  
 
Prince Frederick Parish serves [blank] County, South Carolina  
 
Prince Frederick Parish serves [blank] County, South Carolina  
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Prince Frederick's once took up a large area of South Carolina, but by 1790 this parish (as well as Prince George's to the east) took up all or parts of 6 present-day South Carolina counties: Williamsburg, Florence, Marion, Dillon, Horry & Georgetown. (William Thorndale, References: Albert Sidney Thomas, "A Historical Account of the Protestant Episcopal Church in South Carolina, 1820- 1957." (c1957) William Thorndale, and William Dollarhide, "Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920." (Baltimore: Geneal. Pub., c1987)
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In addition to religious roles, South Carolina's "Anglican parishes were used as election districts and had responsibility for road development, care of the poor, and education."<ref>[http://archives.sc.gov/formation/ "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina,"] at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.</ref>
  
 
=== Founded  ===
 
=== Founded  ===
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=== Boundary  ===
 
=== Boundary  ===
  
*Borders [[All_Saints_Parish,_South_Carolina|All Saints]], [[Prince_George_Parish,_South_Carolina|Prince George]], [[St._Davids_Parish,_South_Carolina|St. David's]], [[St._James_Santee_Parish,_South_Carolina|St. James Santee]], [[St._Marks_Parish,_South_Carolina|St. Mark's]], and [[St._Stephens_Parish,_South_Carolina|St. Stephen's]] parishes. For a map, see: [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/guide/CountyRecords/parishes.htm Early parishes in South Carolina].
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*Borders [[All Saints Parish, South Carolina|All Saints]], [[Prince George Parish, South Carolina|Prince George]], [[St. Davids Parish, South Carolina|St. David's]], [[St. James Santee Parish, South Carolina|St. James Santee]], [[St. Marks Parish, South Carolina|St. Mark's]], and [[St. Stephens Parish, South Carolina|St. Stephen's]] parishes. For a map, see: [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/guide/CountyRecords/parishes.htm Early parishes in South Carolina].
  
 
== Resources  ==
 
== Resources  ==

Revision as of 04:32, 26 January 2011

United States  Gotoarrow.png  South Carolina  Gotoarrow.png  Prince Frederick Parish

Contents

History

Prince Frederick Parish serves [blank] County, South Carolina

Prince Frederick's once took up a large area of South Carolina, but by 1790 this parish (as well as Prince George's to the east) took up all or parts of 6 present-day South Carolina counties: Williamsburg, Florence, Marion, Dillon, Horry & Georgetown. (William Thorndale, References: Albert Sidney Thomas, "A Historical Account of the Protestant Episcopal Church in South Carolina, 1820- 1957." (c1957) William Thorndale, and William Dollarhide, "Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920." (Baltimore: Geneal. Pub., c1987)

In addition to religious roles, South Carolina's "Anglican parishes were used as election districts and had responsibility for road development, care of the poor, and education."[1]

Founded

  • 1734

Boundary

Resources

History

Records

The original parish registers are kept at [blank], South Carolina. Abstracts of baptisms from 1713 to 1794 and marriages from 1726 to 1752 have been published:

  • Prince Frederick Parish and Prince George Parish. The Register Book for the Parish Prince Frederick Winyaw, Ann: Dom: 1713. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1916. FHL Film 547227 Item 7; digital version at Internet Archive.

References

  1. "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina," at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.