Roosevelt Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

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*Area of the County: West part of Uintah County  
 
*Area of the County: West part of Uintah County  
 
*Headquarters in: Roosevelt, Utah  
 
*Headquarters in: Roosevelt, Utah  
*Boundaries of stake:<br><br> ROOSEVELT STAKE OF ZION consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in the west part of Uintah County and the east part of Duchesne County, Utah. The stake is bounded on the north by the Uintah Mountains, east by the White Rock River, the Sand Ridge and the Bookcliff Mountains, south by the Bookcliff Mountains, and west by the Duchesne Stake.
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*Boundaries of stake:<br><br> Roosevelt Stake of Zion consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in the west part of Uintah County and the east part of Duchesne County, Utah. The stake is bounded on the north by the Uintah Mountains, east by the White Rock River, the Sand Ridge and the Bookcliff Mountains, south by the Bookcliff Mountains, and west by the Duchesne Stake.
  
 
<br> <br> '''History Timeline up to about 1930''' <br>  
 
<br> <br> '''History Timeline up to about 1930''' <br>  
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=== Obtain the Records  ===
 
=== Obtain the Records  ===

Revision as of 22:36, 21 January 2013

Utah Church Records go to Duchense County Church Records go to Roosevelt Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches around 1930's, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941).

  • Online through BYU Books. (Free) In the Text search box, type the town or unit name and click Go. Select page numbers (tiny) at the right to see the page.
  • Also available through Ancestry.com ($).

Contents

Roosevelt Stake

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p. 718.[1]

  • Area of the County: West part of Uintah County
  • Headquarters in: Roosevelt, Utah
  • Boundaries of stake:

    Roosevelt Stake of Zion consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in the west part of Uintah County and the east part of Duchesne County, Utah. The stake is bounded on the north by the Uintah Mountains, east by the White Rock River, the Sand Ridge and the Bookcliff Mountains, south by the Bookcliff Mountains, and west by the Duchesne Stake.



History Timeline up to about 1930

  • 1920 - On June 26, 1920, the east part of the Duchesne Stake, or the Alterra, Bennett, Cedarview, Hayden, Ioka, Myton, Neola, Randlett and Roosevelt wards, were organized as the Roosevelt Stake of Zion. Three other wards have since been added, namely, Moffatt Ward in 1921, Montwel Ward in 1923, and Leota Ward in 1925. Hayden Ward was discontinued in 1923.


This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.


Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records

Wards and Branches

Bennett, Cedarview, Hayden, Ioka, Leota, Moffatt, Montwel, Myton, Neola, Randlett and Roosevelt wards. (Hayden Ward was discontinued in 1923)

Bennett Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 58.[2]

Boundaries:

  • Bennett Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Uintah Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming and stock-raising district lying west of the Uintah River. The meeting house, is eight miles northwest of Roosevelt, the stake headquarters, and ten miles northeast of Fort Duchesne. Nearly all the inhabitants living within the limits of the ward are Latter-day Saints.

History timeline
br> 1905 - The Uintah Indian Reservation was thrown open to white settlers. 1906 - Other settlers, Mormon and non-Mormon, followed, the Latter-day Saints being members of the Hayden Ward.

  • 1908 - A post office was established.
  • 1910 - Cuneal Branch (now the Bennett Ward) was organized Sept. 21, 1913.
  • 1920- The Bennett Ward belonged to the Duchesne Stake until 1920, when it became part of the Roosevelt Stake.

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Cedarview Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 124.[3]

Boundaries:
Cederview Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a tract of country lying northwest of Roosevelt. The townsite of Cedarview is about seven miles northwest of Roosevelt, the headquarters of the stake, and seven miles south of Neola. The meeting house, a frame building, is located on the townsite and nearly all the people in the district are members of the Church.

History timeline

  • 1905 - As soon as the Uintah Indian Reservation was thrown open to white settlers in 1905, many Latter-day Saints secured land in that part of the country now included in the Cedarview Ward.
  • 1907 - Sunday school was organized for their benefit in 1907.
  • 1910 - On April 22, 1910, the saints in the locality were organized as a branch of the Roosevelt Ward.
  • 1913 - In 1913 the Cedarview Ward was organized.
  • 1920 - Cedarview belonged to the Duchesne Stake of Zion until 1920, when it became part of the Roosevelt Stake.

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Hayden Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 326-327.[4]

Boundaries:
Hayden Ward, Roosevelt Stake, consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in a flat tract of land lying immediately west of the Uintah River, in a fine cattle raising country partly in Uintah County and partly in Duchesne County, Utah. The Hayden townsite is three miles east of Neola and ten miles north of Roosevelt, the stake headquarters.

History timeline

  • 1906 - All the members of the Church residing west of the so-called “White Rocks” organized as the Nephi Branch of the Duchesne Ward, Sept. 23, 1906.
  • 1906 - A log school house (afterwards known as the Packer School House) was erected 1 1/2 mile west of the present Hayden townsite.
  • 1907 - The next year (1907) a dancing hall known as the Hayden Hall was erected, in which meetings were held for a time.
  • 1907 - A dancing hall known as the Hayden Hall was erected, in which meetings were held for a time. That year the name of the branch was changed to Hayden, this being the name of one of the snow-capped peaks of the Uintah Mountains, within sight.
  • 1910 - In 1910 the Hayden Branch was organized as a ward.
  • 1915 - In 1915 the west part of the Hayden Ward was organized as the Neola Branch.
  • 1928 - July 22, 1928, the Hayden Ward was disorganized and the membership transferred to the Neola Ward, which district had formerly constituted a part of the Hayden Ward.


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Ioka Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 364.[5]

Boundaries:

Ioka Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district lying southwest of Roosevelt. It consists of a little valley surrounded by bluffs and was originally called Mural, which means “walled in valley.” The name was later changed to Ioka (Indian word for bravado), the name of an Indian chief. The center of the ward is 11 miles southwest of Roosevelt, the stake headquarters, and eight miles northwest of Myton.


History timeline

  • 1907 - The first Latter-day Saint who located in that part of the country now included in Ioka Ward was John A. Angus, who arrived with his family.
  • 1907 - In 1907 LDS meetings were commenced in the home of John K. Lemon.
  • 1908 - A Sunday school was organized in Lemon's home Aug. 9, 1908, acting under the direction of the bishopric of the Roosevelt Ward.
  • 1910 - In 1910 the Mural Branch was organized.
  • 1912 - The branch became a ward Sept. 23, 1912, organized as the East Mural Branch.
  • 1915 - In 1915 this (above) branch was disorganized, and the Mural Ward became known as the Ioka Ward.
  • 1920 - Ioka Ward belonged to Duchesne Stake until 1920, when it became part of the Roosevelt Stake.

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Leota Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 427.[6]

Boundaries:
Leota Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Uintah Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district lying southeast of Roosevelt. The center of the ward is a small cluster of houses where there is a Latter-day Saint meeting house (a frame building), a school house, post office, two or three stores, etc. This village is about 25 miles southeast of Roosevelt, the headquarters of the stake, 12 miles east of Randlett, and eight miles north of Ouray.


History timeline

  • 1917 - In 1917 a Sunday school was organized in the Leota district. Leota is an outgrowth of the Randlett Ward.
  • 1920 - The saints at Leota were organized as a branch of the Randlett Ward Nov. 14, 1920.
  • 1925 - This branch became the Leota Ward Sept. 13 1925.

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Moffatt Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 523.[7]

Boundaries:
Moffatt Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Uintah Co., Utah, comprises the Latter-day Saints residing in the town of Moffatt and at Fort Duchesne and surrounding country. Moffatt, named for David H. Moffatt, a railroad magnate, is on the main highway leading to Vernal, about nine miles east of Roosevelt, the stake headquarters, and 25 miles southwest of Vernal, the county seat.


History timeline

  • 1918 - Moffatt Ward is an outgrowth of the Randlett Ward. A Sunday school was organized in the Moffatt part of Randlett Ward in 1918.
  • 1920 - Branch organization was created Nov. 14, 1920.
  • 1921 - Moffatt Ward was organized Sept. 4, 1921.

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Montwel Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 530.[8]

Boundaries:

Montwel Ward, in Roosevelt Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of saints residing in the farming district lying northwest of Roosevelt. The center of the ward of villege where the LDS meeting house and the school district in on the main road about 10 miles from Roosevelt and two miles northwest of Cedarview.

History timeline

  • 1921 - Montwel is an outgrowth of the Cedarview Ward, the westerm part of which was organized as the well branch in 1921.
  • 1923 - December 9, 1923 Montwel (branch) was organized as the Montwel Ward.


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Myton Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 558.[9]

Boundaries:

Myton Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing originally at Myton, a government town situated at the old crossing of the Duchesne River, about two miles below the junction of Lake Fork with that river, and 11 miles southwest of Roosevelt, the headquarters of the stake. Myton Ward extends up and down the Duchesne River about 12 miles, 2 1/2 miles above and about ten miles below.

The farming district of Hartford, located from five to eight miles northeast of Myton on the north side of the river, is also included in the Myton Ward. At Hartford a Sunday school and Primary Association are conducted under the direction of the Myton Ward bishopric.


History timeline

  • No dates mentioned for a timeline

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Neola Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 566-567.[10]

Boundaries:
Neola Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of a farming district in which the townsite of Neola is the center. This townsite is three miles west of Hayden, 11 miles by nearest road northwest of Roosevelt, the stake headquarters, and seven miles south of the base of the Uintah Mountains, in full sight of Gilbert Peak.

Neola is as Indian word meaning “last move”. The ward meeting house, is located on the townsite. Neola is the center of a developing dairy project, which embraces the whole basin territory.


History timeline

  • Nothing listed.

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Randlett Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 691.[11]

Boundaries:

Randlett Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Uintah Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district on the west side of Green River, of which the village of Randlett is the center. Part of Ouray Valley is within the limits of the ward which extends east to the Leota Ward, south to the Bookcliff Ward, west to the Myron Ward and north to the Moffatt Ward. Randlett is 14 miles southeast of Roosevelt, the headquarters of the stake.

History timeline

  • 1892 - Randlett was the site of an Indian school as early as 1892.
  • 1905 - 1905 the Uintah Indian Reservation was opened for settlement by the whites, these buildings (the Indian School Site) became the property of the Uintah School District.

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Roosevelt Wards

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 718-719.[12]

Boundaries:

  • Roosevelt Ward, Roosvelt, Utah is located in the so-called Dry Gulch country, a fertile farming region. The center of the ward is eight miles west of Fort Duchesne, 32 miles southwest of Vernal and 11 miles northeast of Myton.
  • Roosevelt 1st Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Utah consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in the east part of the town of Roosevelt.
  • Roosvelt 2nd Ward, Roosevelt Stake, Utah consisted of the Latter-day Saints residing in the west part of the town of Roosevelt.

History timeline

  • 1907 - Roosevelt is an outgrowth of the Duchesne Ward, which on Sept. 10, was divided into three divisions to be known as the Roosevelt.
  • 1920 - Roosevelt Ward was divided into two wards, namely, Roosevelt 1st Ward and Roosevelt 2nd Ward which only lasted from June 26, 1920, to May 5, 1929.
  • 1926 - On June 26, 1920, the east part of the Duchesne Stake, or the Alterra, Bennett, Cedarview, Hayden, Ioka, Myton, Neola, Randlett and Roosevelt wards,were organized as the Roosevelt Stake of Zion.
  • 1921 - Moffatt Ward in 1921 was added to Roosevelt Stake.
  • 1923 - Montwel Ward in 1923 was added to Roosevelt Stake.
  • 1925 - Leota Ward in 1925 was added to Roosevelt Stake.
  • 1929 - Roosvelt 1st and 2nd ward combined into one ward May 5, 1929.
  • 1930 - Meeting house building burned down, owned jointly by the Roosevelt Ward and the Roosevelt Stake.

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References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 718.
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 58.
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 124.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 326-327.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 364.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 427.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 523.
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 530.
  9. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 558.
  10. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 566-567.
  11. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 691.
  12. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 718-719.