Slovakia Names Personal

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Back to [[Portal:Slovakia|Slovakia Portal Page]]►  
 
Back to [[Portal:Slovakia|Slovakia Portal Page]]►  
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===Introduction===
  
 
After settling in America, immigrants from Slovakia, regardless of their ethnic, social, and cultural background, usually modified or changed their names. That's why contemporary surnames of Slovak-Americans differ from those of their Slovak relatives, which both differ from what it was historically.  
 
After settling in America, immigrants from Slovakia, regardless of their ethnic, social, and cultural background, usually modified or changed their names. That's why contemporary surnames of Slovak-Americans differ from those of their Slovak relatives, which both differ from what it was historically.  
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*'''nicknames''', etc.
 
*'''nicknames''', etc.
  
In addition, the whole description of a person could be recorded in many different ways, depending on the nationality, mother tongue, language used, education, and
+
In addition, the whole description of a person could be recorded in many different ways, depending on the nationality, mother tongue, language used, education, and other personal abilities of a writer (clerk, priest). That's why each of our forefathers has a variety of different names.  
other personal abilities of a writer (clerk, priest). That's why each of our forefathers has a variety of different names.
+
  
Such patterns lasted till the end of the 18th century, when under the reign of Joseph II, surnames became hereditary by law. In spite of that, various forms of one person's name appeared even at the beginning of our century. By the way, the unofficial, so-called "living" names are still used in Slovakia. Especially in the
+
Such patterns lasted till the end of the 18th century, when under the reign of Joseph II, surnames became hereditary by law. In spite of that, various forms of one person's name appeared even at the beginning of our century. By the way, the unofficial, so-called "living" names are still used in Slovakia. Especially in the countryside, persons are distinguished by them in everyday conversation.  
countryside, persons are distinguished by them in everyday conversation.
+
+
===Development of Slovak Historical Surnames===
+
  
It is generally known that people were originally distinguished by just one name. The first hereditary names, surnames, from Slovakia were recorded just in the 13th century. The oldest ones were created among nobility, later among town dwellers, but very soon we can find them also among country folk, the largest group of Hungarian society. They appeared first in the south and southeastern areas, from where they spread to other parts of the country. In the 15th-16th centuries, last names were in general use.
+
=== Development of Slovak Historical Surnames ===
  
Slovakian surnames were influenced by the contacts with surrounding ethnic groups or emerging nations and by great migration. In the 13th-14th centuries, large groups of Germans settled in several regions of Slovakia, and they brought their own surnames to their new homeland. Further changes and imports of surnames accompanied the Valachian colonization (14th-15th centuries), Serbian and Croatian immigration (16th-17th centuries), and various Slovak migrations
+
It is generally known that people were originally distinguished by just one name. The first hereditary names, surnames, from Slovakia were recorded just in the 13th century. The oldest ones were created among nobility, later among town dwellers, but very soon we can find them also among country folk, the largest group of Hungarian society. They appeared first in the south and southeastern areas, from where they spread to other parts of the country. In the 15th-16th centuries, last names were in general use.
  
The names of all these people were changing according to social, ethnic, historical, and political conditions. The name of each family developed in its own way. Many descendants of German families have preserved their original German names. In rare cases, we are able to define locality, period, and special circumstances of their creation from the names themselves. In the majority of cases, however, we can do this only approximately. Let's mention just several characteristics that will enable us to do the basic classification of Slovakian surnames.
+
Slovakian surnames were influenced by the contacts with surrounding ethnic groups or emerging nations and by great migration. In the 13th-14th centuries, large groups of Germans settled in several regions of Slovakia, and they brought their own surnames to their new homeland. Further changes and imports of surnames accompanied the Valachian colonization (14th-15th centuries), Serbian and Croatian immigration (16th-17th centuries), and various Slovak migrations
  
There is just one group of surnames that often strictly reflects the ethnic background of the family ancestor: surnames derived from ethnic names ''Slovák, Tóth, Nemec, Polák, Rusnák, Chorvát, Horváth'', etc. They tell us very clearly that the bearer of such a name settled individually in a community of different ethnicity. According to the language of this name, we can also guess the nationality of his neighbors (for example, Tóth could be a Slovak settled among Hungarians, because Tóth is a Hungarian word a Slovak).
+
The names of all these people were changing according to social, ethnic, historical, and political conditions. The name of each family developed in its own way. Many descendants of German families have preserved their original German names. In rare cases, we are able to define locality, period, and special circumstances of their creation from the names themselves. In the majority of cases, however, we can do this only approximately. Let's mention just several characteristics that will enable us to do the basic classification of Slovakian surnames.  
  
In some cases, we are even able to guess the period of such a surname creation and thus also the period of the ancestor's settling in Upper Hungary. For example, the surnames designating Croats (Horváth, Chorváth, etc., very often appeared in the 16th and 17th centuries, during the mass immigration of Croats into the northern parts of Hungary.
+
There is just one group of surnames that often strictly reflects the ethnic background of the family ancestor: surnames derived from ethnic names ''Slovák, Tóth, Nemec, Polák, Rusnák, Chorvát, Horváth'', etc. They tell us very clearly that the bearer of such a name settled individually in a community of different ethnicity. According to the language of this name, we can also guess the nationality of his neighbors (for example, Tóth could be a Slovak settled among Hungarians, because Tóth is a Hungarian word a Slovak).
 +
 
 +
In some cases, we are even able to guess the period of such a surname creation and thus also the period of the ancestor's settling in Upper Hungary. For example, the surnames designating Croats (Horváth, Chorváth, etc., very often appeared in the 16th and 17th centuries, during the mass immigration of Croats into the northern parts of Hungary.  
  
 
A large group of surnames has been derived from first names (of men, less often of women). As an example, we can mention the common names  
 
A large group of surnames has been derived from first names (of men, less often of women). As an example, we can mention the common names  
*''Jančo, Janoška'' from Ján - John
+
 
*''Štefanec'' from Štefan - Stephen
+
*''Jančo, Janoška'' from Ján - John  
 +
*''Štefanec'' from Štefan - Stephen  
 
*''Michalko'' from Michal - Michael  
 
*''Michalko'' from Michal - Michael  
*''Ďuriška'' from Juraj - George
+
*''Ďuriška'' from Juraj - George  
*''Balaša'' from Baláš - Blasius, the names of the old noble families
+
*''Balaša'' from Baláš - Blasius, the names of the old noble families  
 
*''Detrich, Meško'', derived from old first names almost unused today
 
*''Detrich, Meško'', derived from old first names almost unused today
  
In Slovakia, surnames derived from localities are very frequent. Similar to those mentioned previously, they originated in all social and ethnic communities. The oldest ones were created among the nobility. Such names (Kubfui,
+
In Slovakia, surnames derived from localities are very frequent. Similar to those mentioned previously, they originated in all social and ethnic communities. The oldest ones were created among the nobility. Such names (Kubfui, Ostroh1cky, Sentivani, Diveky, etc.) were usually derived from small localities, some of which were later destroyed. They often refer to an ancient origin of the family or its ennoblement before the 15th-16th centuries. In these surnames, the name the original property of the family or property granted later is often seen. names of this kind created in other social communities ("Sucansky," "TrenCiansky," "Liptak") refer to the local or territorial origin of the ancestor as well as to his migration form the particular locality or area (Sucansky from Suca or Sucany, Trenciansky from Trencin or the county of Trencin, Liptak from the region of Liptov. Such names can often be found among descendants of the hungarian Slovaks from the Lowlands. (They were created during their migration in the 17th and 18th centuries.) In the 19th century, names of this kind also appeared among Jews (derived mainly from large European counties -- "Wiener," "Hamburger"). Sometimes they were the same as names of well-known Hungarian noble families).  
Ostroh1cky, Sentivani, Diveky, etc.) were usually derived
+
from small localities, some of which were later destroyed.
+
They often refer to an ancient origin of the family or its
+
ennoblement before the 15th-16th centuries. In these
+
surnames, the name the original property of the family or
+
property granted later is often seen. names of this kind
+
created in other social communities ("Sucansky,"
+
"TrenCiansky," "Liptak") refer to the local or territorial
+
origin of the ancestor as well as to his migration form the
+
particular locality or area (Sucansky from Suca or Sucany,
+
Trenciansky from Trencin or the county of Trencin, Liptak
+
from the region of Liptov. Such names can often be found
+
among descendants of the hungarian Slovaks from the
+
Lowlands. (They were created during their migration in the
+
17th and 18th centuries.) In the 19th century, names of this
+
kind also appeared among Jews (derived mainly from large
+
European counties -- "Wiener," "Hamburger"). Sometimes
+
they were the same as names of well-known Hungarian
+
noble families).
+
  
A further large group consists of surnames derived from occupations ''Kováč, Mlynár, Minárik, Švec, Szabó, Schmidt'' etc. They usually appeared in later
+
A further large group consists of surnames derived from occupations ''Kováč, Mlynár, Minárik, Švec, Szabó, Schmidt'' etc. They usually appeared in later centuries and reflect the family ancestor's occupation.  
centuries and reflect the family ancestor's occupation.
+
  
 
There are also other groups of surnames reflecting an ancestor's nature, mental or physical qualities, etc. And finally, there is a large group of surnames for which the origin or contents remains and will remain without clear explanation.  
 
There are also other groups of surnames reflecting an ancestor's nature, mental or physical qualities, etc. And finally, there is a large group of surnames for which the origin or contents remains and will remain without clear explanation.  

Revision as of 19:02, 13 December 2010

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Contents

Introduction

After settling in America, immigrants from Slovakia, regardless of their ethnic, social, and cultural background, usually modified or changed their names. That's why contemporary surnames of Slovak-Americans differ from those of their Slovak relatives, which both differ from what it was historically.

In the absence of a consistent system, names in Slovakia (similar to other European countries) were not stable for many centuries. Medieval people or even those of the 18th century, were not forced to use one official, very individual, and hereditary surname. It was enough if one could be more or less precisely distinguished by the society. Everyone had a given name, usually a Christian name. This was used during the course of his life in various forms.

For example, George could be used in Latin forms Georgius or Georg, in Hungarian György, in Slovak forms Juraj Ďord' Juro Jurko Ďuro Dzuro Ďurko.
The first name was further supplemented with different characteristics:

  • father's, mother's, or family name: Glaško derived from Blasius or Blazej; Matuška derived from Mat'us or Mathias; Tomašikoviech from Tomáš or Thomas.
  • occupation: Kolár - Wheeler, Schmidt - Smith.
  • place of origin: Ocovská - a native of Očova, Turčan - a citizen of the Turiec region, Horváth - Croat.
  • nicknames, etc.

In addition, the whole description of a person could be recorded in many different ways, depending on the nationality, mother tongue, language used, education, and other personal abilities of a writer (clerk, priest). That's why each of our forefathers has a variety of different names.

Such patterns lasted till the end of the 18th century, when under the reign of Joseph II, surnames became hereditary by law. In spite of that, various forms of one person's name appeared even at the beginning of our century. By the way, the unofficial, so-called "living" names are still used in Slovakia. Especially in the countryside, persons are distinguished by them in everyday conversation.

Development of Slovak Historical Surnames

It is generally known that people were originally distinguished by just one name. The first hereditary names, surnames, from Slovakia were recorded just in the 13th century. The oldest ones were created among nobility, later among town dwellers, but very soon we can find them also among country folk, the largest group of Hungarian society. They appeared first in the south and southeastern areas, from where they spread to other parts of the country. In the 15th-16th centuries, last names were in general use.

Slovakian surnames were influenced by the contacts with surrounding ethnic groups or emerging nations and by great migration. In the 13th-14th centuries, large groups of Germans settled in several regions of Slovakia, and they brought their own surnames to their new homeland. Further changes and imports of surnames accompanied the Valachian colonization (14th-15th centuries), Serbian and Croatian immigration (16th-17th centuries), and various Slovak migrations

The names of all these people were changing according to social, ethnic, historical, and political conditions. The name of each family developed in its own way. Many descendants of German families have preserved their original German names. In rare cases, we are able to define locality, period, and special circumstances of their creation from the names themselves. In the majority of cases, however, we can do this only approximately. Let's mention just several characteristics that will enable us to do the basic classification of Slovakian surnames.

There is just one group of surnames that often strictly reflects the ethnic background of the family ancestor: surnames derived from ethnic names Slovák, Tóth, Nemec, Polák, Rusnák, Chorvát, Horváth, etc. They tell us very clearly that the bearer of such a name settled individually in a community of different ethnicity. According to the language of this name, we can also guess the nationality of his neighbors (for example, Tóth could be a Slovak settled among Hungarians, because Tóth is a Hungarian word a Slovak).

In some cases, we are even able to guess the period of such a surname creation and thus also the period of the ancestor's settling in Upper Hungary. For example, the surnames designating Croats (Horváth, Chorváth, etc., very often appeared in the 16th and 17th centuries, during the mass immigration of Croats into the northern parts of Hungary.

A large group of surnames has been derived from first names (of men, less often of women). As an example, we can mention the common names

  • Jančo, Janoška from Ján - John
  • Štefanec from Štefan - Stephen
  • Michalko from Michal - Michael
  • Ďuriška from Juraj - George
  • Balaša from Baláš - Blasius, the names of the old noble families
  • Detrich, Meško, derived from old first names almost unused today

In Slovakia, surnames derived from localities are very frequent. Similar to those mentioned previously, they originated in all social and ethnic communities. The oldest ones were created among the nobility. Such names (Kubfui, Ostroh1cky, Sentivani, Diveky, etc.) were usually derived from small localities, some of which were later destroyed. They often refer to an ancient origin of the family or its ennoblement before the 15th-16th centuries. In these surnames, the name the original property of the family or property granted later is often seen. names of this kind created in other social communities ("Sucansky," "TrenCiansky," "Liptak") refer to the local or territorial origin of the ancestor as well as to his migration form the particular locality or area (Sucansky from Suca or Sucany, Trenciansky from Trencin or the county of Trencin, Liptak from the region of Liptov. Such names can often be found among descendants of the hungarian Slovaks from the Lowlands. (They were created during their migration in the 17th and 18th centuries.) In the 19th century, names of this kind also appeared among Jews (derived mainly from large European counties -- "Wiener," "Hamburger"). Sometimes they were the same as names of well-known Hungarian noble families).

A further large group consists of surnames derived from occupations Kováč, Mlynár, Minárik, Švec, Szabó, Schmidt etc. They usually appeared in later centuries and reflect the family ancestor's occupation.

There are also other groups of surnames reflecting an ancestor's nature, mental or physical qualities, etc. And finally, there is a large group of surnames for which the origin or contents remains and will remain without clear explanation.

Male Given Names

Andrej (or Ondrej)
Anton
František
Jakub
Ján
Jozef
Juraj
Karol
Lukáš
Martin
Matej
Matúš
Michal
Pavol
Peter
Štefan
Tomáš

Andrew
Anthony
Frank
Jacob
John
Joseph
George
Charles
Luke
Martin
Matthew
Matthias
Michael
Paul
Peter
Stephen
Thomas

Female Given Names

Alžbeta
Anna
Antonia
Apolónia
Barbora
Cecília
Dorota
Eva
Františka
Johana
Juliana
Jozefa
Katarína
Mária
Margita
Rozália
Štefánia
Terézia
Žofia
Zuzana

Elizabeth
Ann
Antonia
Apollonia
Barbara
Cecilia
Dorothy
Eve
Frances
Johanna
Julianna
Josephine
Catherine
Mary
Margaret
Rosalie
Stephanie
Theresa
Sophia
Susan