St. Marks Parish, South CarolinaEdit This Page

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== History  ==
 
== History  ==
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'''St. Mark’s Parish's''' first colonial church was built about 1740, near Wright’s Bluff north of the Santee River. During the Revolutionary War British troops destroyed it. A new building was constructed in Williamsburg County in 1809. That church was destroyed by fire. From 1827 to 1828 a new one was rebuilt near Remini on the Clarendon/Sumter border by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. However, this was an unhealthy location. So, it was moved up on the Charleston-Camden Road. But that church was burned in a forest fire a few years later. The current church was built in 1856 in the heart of the Sand Hills.<ref>Cynthia Ridgeway Parker, "St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Pinewood, Sumter County, S.C.," http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scsumter/pictures/stmark/stmark.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
  
 
Before the American Revolution, the state church of South Carolina was the [[South Carolina Church Records#Church_of_England_.28Anglican.2C_Protestant_Episcopal.29|Church of England (the Anglican Church, or Protestant Episcopal Church)]]. Besides keeping parish registers, the church kept many records of a civil nature in their vestry books. The Vestry was as much a political body as a religious one. The wardens and commissioners were responsible for the roads, education, the poor and orphans, voting and collecting taxes in addition to their church duties.<ref>[http://archives.sc.gov/formation/ "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina,"] at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.</ref>  
 
Before the American Revolution, the state church of South Carolina was the [[South Carolina Church Records#Church_of_England_.28Anglican.2C_Protestant_Episcopal.29|Church of England (the Anglican Church, or Protestant Episcopal Church)]]. Besides keeping parish registers, the church kept many records of a civil nature in their vestry books. The Vestry was as much a political body as a religious one. The wardens and commissioners were responsible for the roads, education, the poor and orphans, voting and collecting taxes in addition to their church duties.<ref>[http://archives.sc.gov/formation/ "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina,"] at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.</ref>  
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:*parts of [[Camden District, South Carolina|Camden]], [[Cheraw District, South Carolina|Cheraw]], and [[Georgetown District, South Carolina|Georgetown]] districts 1768-1800<ref name="1770map" />  
 
:*parts of [[Camden District, South Carolina|Camden]], [[Cheraw District, South Carolina|Cheraw]], and [[Georgetown District, South Carolina|Georgetown]] districts 1768-1800<ref name="1770map" />  
 
:*parts of [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]], [[Claremont County, South Carolina|Claremont]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Liberty County, South Carolina|Liberty]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]] counties, and all of [[Clarendon (1785-1800) County, South Carolina|Clarendon (1785-1800) County]] 1785-1800<ref name="1785map">"South Carolina Districts and County - 1785" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1785.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>  
 
:*parts of [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]], [[Claremont County, South Carolina|Claremont]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Liberty County, South Carolina|Liberty]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]] counties, and all of [[Clarendon (1785-1800) County, South Carolina|Clarendon (1785-1800) County]] 1785-1800<ref name="1785map">"South Carolina Districts and County - 1785" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1785.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>  
:*part of [[Salem County, South Carolina|Salem County]] 1792-1800  
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:*part of [[Salem County, South Carolina|Salem County]] 1792-1800<ref name="1792map">"South Carolina Districts and Counties 1792 to 1799" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1799.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
:*[[Liberty County, South Carolina|Liberty County]] became [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion County]] 1798-1800  
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:*[[Liberty County, South Carolina|Liberty County]] became [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion County]] 1798-1800<ref name="1792map" />
:*parts of [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]], [[Sumter County, South Carolina|Sumter]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]] counties 1800-present  
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:*parts of [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]], [[Sumter County, South Carolina|Sumter]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]] counties 1800-present<ref name="1800map">"South Carolina Districts - 1800" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1800.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
:*[[Clarendon County, South Carolina|Clarendon County]] 1855-present  
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:*[[Clarendon County, South Carolina|Clarendon County]] 1855-present<ref name="1860map">"South Carolina Districts - 1860" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1800s/sc_1800s_districts_1860.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
:*part of [[Florence County, South Carolina|Florence County]] 1888-present  
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:*part of [[Florence County, South Carolina|Florence County]] 1888-present<ref name="1890map">"South Carolina Counties - 1890" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1800s/sc_1800s_districts_1890.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
:*part of [[Lee County, South Carolina|Lee County]] 1902-present
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:*part of [[Lee County, South Carolina|Lee County]] 1902-present<ref name="1910map">"South Carolina Counties - 1910" [map] in ''Carolana'' at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1900s/sc_1900s_counties_1910.html (accessed 6 June 2011).</ref>
  
'''Modern equivalents:''' The original parish covered most of what are present-day [[Clarendon County, South Carolina|Clarendon]], and [[Sumter County, South Carolina|Sumter]], and parts of [[Lee County, South Carolina|Lee]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Dillon County, South Carolina|Dillon]], [[Horry County, South Carolina|Horry]], [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion]], [[Florence County, South Carolina|Florence]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]], and [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]] counties.  
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'''Modern equivalents:''' The original parish covered most of what are present-day [[Clarendon County, South Carolina|Clarendon]], and [[Sumter County, South Carolina|Sumter]], and parts of [[Lee County, South Carolina|Lee]], [[Darlington County, South Carolina|Darlington]], [[Dillon County, South Carolina|Dillon]], [[Horry County, South Carolina|Horry]], [[Marion County, South Carolina|Marion]], [[Florence County, South Carolina|Florence]], [[Williamsburg County, South Carolina|Williamsburg]], and [[Richland County, South Carolina|Richland]] counties.<ref name="1760map" /><ref name="1910map" />
  
 
== Resources  ==
 
== Resources  ==

Latest revision as of 17:49, 6 June 2011

United States Gotoarrow.png South Carolina Gotoarrow.png St. Mark's Parish

Contents

History

St. Mark’s Parish's first colonial church was built about 1740, near Wright’s Bluff north of the Santee River. During the Revolutionary War British troops destroyed it. A new building was constructed in Williamsburg County in 1809. That church was destroyed by fire. From 1827 to 1828 a new one was rebuilt near Remini on the Clarendon/Sumter border by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. However, this was an unhealthy location. So, it was moved up on the Charleston-Camden Road. But that church was burned in a forest fire a few years later. The current church was built in 1856 in the heart of the Sand Hills.[1]

Before the American Revolution, the state church of South Carolina was the Church of England (the Anglican Church, or Protestant Episcopal Church). Besides keeping parish registers, the church kept many records of a civil nature in their vestry books. The Vestry was as much a political body as a religious one. The wardens and commissioners were responsible for the roads, education, the poor and orphans, voting and collecting taxes in addition to their church duties.[2]

Founded

St. Mark's Parish (originally in Summerton, Clarendon, SC, now near Pinewood, Sumter, SC) was created in 1757 from the northwest side of Prince Frederick Parish on the far northwest side of Craven County.[3]

Boundary

Borders: Prince Frederick and St. Stephen's parishes on the southeast, St. John's Berkeley Parish in Berkeley (1682-1768) County on the southwest, and the North Carolina line on the northeast.[4] In 1767 the northwest half of the parish was split off into St. David's Parish. In 1768 St. Matthew's Parish in Orangeburgh District, and St. James Goose Creek became the southwest border.[5] For a map, see: Early parishes in South Carolina. An overlay of districts is available at Carolana.com.

Areas Served: St. Mark's Parish served:

Modern equivalents: The original parish covered most of what are present-day Clarendon, and Sumter, and parts of Lee, Darlington, Dillon, Horry, Marion, Florence, Williamsburg, and Richland counties.[4][11]

Resources

Cemeteries

Select graves from St. Mark's Parish Church Cemetery are described at Find A Grave.

The tombstones at Richardson Cemetery, a private burial ground within the parish, have been transcribed:

  • "Tombstone Inscriptions, Richardson Cemetery: Located in Old St. Mark's Parish; Four Miles Southeast of Remini, Clarendon County, S.C.," The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Jan. 1927):55-68. Digital version at JSTOR ($).

Parish History

  • Burgess, James M. Chronicles of St. Mark's Parish, Santee Circuit, and Williamsburg Township, South Carolina. Columbia, S.C.: Charles A. Calvo, Jr., Printer, 1888. Digital version at Google Books; FHL Film 908980 Item 9
  • Richardson, Thomas E. The Parish of St. Mark. FHL Film 954248 Item 9.

For an early history of the parish, see Chapter 13, St. Mark's Parish, pages 323-325, in:

  • Dalcho, Frederick. An Historical Account of the Protestant Episcopal Church in South Carolina from the First Settlement of the Province, to the War of the Revolution; with Notices of the Present State of the Church in Each Parish and Some Account of the Early Civil History of Carolina, Never Before Published. Charleston: E. Thayer, 1820. FHL Film 22657; digital versions at Google Books; Internet Archive.

Parish Records

Websites

References

  1. Cynthia Ridgeway Parker, "St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Pinewood, Sumter County, S.C.," http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scsumter/pictures/stmark/stmark.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  2. "The Formation of Counties in South Carolina," at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History website, accessed 21 January 2011.
  3. Wikipedia contributors, "St. Mark's Episcopal Church (Pinewood, South Carolina)" in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Mark%27s_Episcopal_Church_%28Pinewood,_South_Carolina%29 (accessed 6 June 2011).
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "South Carolina Counties and Parishes - 1760" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Royal_Colony/sc_royal_colony_counties_parishes_1760.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  5. 5.0 5.1 "South Carolina Districts and Parishes - 1770" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Royal_Colony/sc_royal_colony_districts_parishes_1770.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  6. "South Carolina Districts and County - 1785" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1785.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  7. 7.0 7.1 "South Carolina Districts and Counties 1792 to 1799" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1799.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  8. "South Carolina Districts - 1800" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/Early_Statehood/sc_statehood_1800_districts_counties_1800.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  9. "South Carolina Districts - 1860" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1800s/sc_1800s_districts_1860.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  10. "South Carolina Counties - 1890" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1800s/sc_1800s_districts_1890.html (accessed 6 June 2011).
  11. 11.0 11.1 "South Carolina Counties - 1910" [map] in Carolana at http://www.carolana.com/SC/1900s/sc_1900s_counties_1910.html (accessed 6 June 2011).

 

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  • This page was last modified on 6 June 2011, at 17:49.
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