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England Gotoarrow.png London Gotoarrow.png London Parishes Gotoarrow.png St Edmund the King with St Nicholas Acons

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Contents

Parish History

"St Edmund the King with St Nicholas Acons, the church of, is situated on the north side of Lombard Street, between George Yard and Birchin Lane/ This church derives its names from being dedicated to St Edmund, King of the East Angles, who was murdered by the Danes in 870. The original church supposed to have been built in the Saxon heptarchy, and the late church was destroyed in the great fire of 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren, and finished in 1690. It differes from most churches of that period, as it stands north and south, and the atltar is at the north end. Its lenth is 69 feet, its breadth 39 feet, and its height 32 feet. At the south end is a square tower, with a well-proportioned spire, and a dial projecting into the street. This church is a rectory in the patronage of the King and the Archbishop of Canterbury alternately. The parish is united to that of St nicholas Acons, the church of which, before the fire of London, stood on the west side of St Nicholas, and was a rectory in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury; and hence the alternate patronage. These united parishes are in the ward of Langbourn, in the archdeaconry of London..."[1]

St Edmund the King belonged to Langbourn Ward. The parish was also known as St Edmund the King and Martyr Lombard Street.

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Church records

Available at TheGenealogist:

  • St Edmund the King & Martyr, Lombard Street, London (Burials) 1670-1812
  • St Edmund the King & Martyr, Lombard Street, London (Marriages) 1674-1812
  • St Nicholas Acons, London (Baptisms) 1540-1812
  • St Nicholas Acons, London (Burials) 1540-1812
  • St Nicholas Acons, London (Marriages) 1539-1665

Pallot

  • Edmund: 1780-1799, 1812-1837
  • Nicholas: 1780-1837

To find the names of the neighbouring parishes, use England Jurisdictions 1851. In this site, search for the name of the parish, click on the location "pin", click Options and click List contiguous parishes.

Contributor: Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts, nonconformist and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection.

Census records

1582 Subsidy

1625 Subsidy

  • St Nicholas Acons, Candlewick Street Ward, London (The National Archives, Ref: E179/147/512); copy: FHL Film 2228703.

1638 Inhabitants List

1641 Subsidy

  • St Edmund the King and Martyr, Cornhill Ward, London (The National Archives, Ref: E179/147/568); copy: FHL Film 2228704.

1666 Hearth Tax


Contributor: Include an overview if there is any unique information, such as the census for X year was destroyed. Add a link to online sites for indexes and/or images. Also add a link to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection.

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish.

Before 1858, St Edmund the King with St Nicholas Acons fell under the jurisdiction of the Court of the Commissary of the Bishop of London.

Go to London Probate Records to find the names of the courts having secondary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

From 1858 to the present, refer to the Principal Probate Registry.

Cemetery

Londonstedmundkingcemetery.jpg

Transcripts of early St Edmund the King with St Nicholas Acons tombs found in the interior of the churches were published in Catalogue of the most Memorable Persons who had visible Tombs, plated Gravestones ... in the City of London (through) A.D. 1700, which is available online.[2]

A cemetery survey (1910), available online, covers monumental inscriptions in the St Edmund the King and Martyr churchyard.[3]

Poor Law Unions

Contributor: Add information about the pertinent poor law unions in the area.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: St Nicholas Acons
Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: St Edmund, King and Martyr

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