Superintendencies of Indian AffairsEdit This Page

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Superintendents of Indian Affairs for a specific locality existed from approximately 1803 until 1878, when the last Superintendency was abolished. After 1878, agents of the Bureau of Indian Affairs reported directly to the Commissioner's Office in Washington, DC.

A Superintendent of Indian Affairs was an administrator, communicating and overseeing the agents who worked directly with individual tribes. It was the responsibility of the superintendent to see that the agents were following official government policy. Records for Superintendencies exist in the National Archives and copies of many of them are also available in other research facilities.

Contents

The Superintendencies

Arizona Superintendency

Arkansas Superintendency

California Superintendency

Central Superintendency

Colorado Superintendency

Dakota Superintendency

Florida Superintendency

Idaho Superintendency

Iowa Superintendency

Michigan Superintendency

Minnesota Superintendency

Montana Superintendency

Nevada Superintendency

New Mexico Superintendency

Northern Superintendency

Oregon Superintendency

Southern Superintendency

St. Louis Superintendency

Utah Superintendency

Washington Superintendency

Western Superintendency

Wisconsin Superintendency

Wyoming Superintendency

References

Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. New York, New York: Clearwater Press, [1974].

Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington [District of Columbia]: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981.

Historical Sketches for Jurisdictional and Subject Headings Used for the Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880. National Archives Microcopy T1105.

Preliminary Inventory No. 163: Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Washington, DC:


 

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