Ulverston St Mary, Lancashire

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See a [[Comprehensive List of Chapelries in Ulverston Parish]]  
 
See a [[Comprehensive List of Chapelries in Ulverston Parish]]  
  
[[Image:Ulverston St Mary Lancashire.JPG|thumb|right]]  
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[[Image:Ulverston St Mary Lancashire.JPG|thumb|right|Ulverston St Mary Lancashire.JPG]]  
  
 
== Parish History  ==
 
== Parish History  ==
  
ULVERSTON (St. Mary), a market-town and '''parish''', and the head of a union, in the hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster; containing, with the townships of Mansriggs, Osmotherley, and Subberthwaite, and the chapelries of Blawith, Church-Conistone, Egtonwith Newland, Lowick, and Torver. It lies 22 miles (N. W.) from Lancaster. This place derives its name, written in old records Olvestonam, from Ulpha, a Saxon lord; and was conferred in 1127, on the abbey of Furness, by Stephen, afterwards King of England.&nbsp; Ulverston is a port within the port of Lancaster, and is little more than a mile distant from the Furness channel in Morecambe bay.&nbsp; The parish was anciently included in the parish of Dalton. In the rural parts of the parish are five separate chapels. The '''Independents''', '''Wesleyans''', and '''Roman Catholics''' have places of worship; and Sunday schools in connexion both with the churches and meetinghouses afford religious instruction to a large number of children. There are, besides, auxiliaries of the Christian Knowledge, the British and Foreign Bible, the Gospel Propagation, the Church Missionary, and London and Wesleyan Missionary, Societies. The '''Friends''' meeting-house near Swarthmoor Hall is a plain structure: over the doorway is the inscription "Ex dono G. F. 1688. <ref>Lewis, Samuel A., ''[http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51361 A Topographical Dictionary of England]'' (1848), pp. 414-418. Adapted. Date accessed: 02 August 2010.</ref><br>  
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ULVERSTON (St. Mary), a market-town and '''parish''', and the head of a union, in the hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster; containing, with the townships of Mansriggs, Osmotherley, and Subberthwaite, and the chapelries of Blawith, Church-Conistone, Egtonwith Newland, Lowick, and Torver. It lies 22 miles (N. W.) from Lancaster. This place derives its name, written in old records Olvestonam, from Ulpha, a Saxon lord; and was conferred in 1127, on the abbey of Furness, by Stephen, afterwards King of England.&nbsp; Ulverston is a port within the port of Lancaster, and is little more than a mile distant from the Furness channel in Morecambe bay.&nbsp; The parish was anciently included in the parish of Dalton. In the rural parts of the parish are five separate chapels. The '''Independents''', '''Wesleyans''', and '''Roman Catholics''' have places of worship; and Sunday schools in connexion both with the churches and meetinghouses afford religious instruction to a large number of children. There are, besides, auxiliaries of the Christian Knowledge, the British and Foreign Bible, the Gospel Propagation, the Church Missionary, and London and Wesleyan Missionary, Societies. The '''Friends''' meeting-house near Swarthmoor Hall is a plain structure: over the doorway is the inscription "Ex dono G. F. 1688. <ref>Lewis, Samuel A., ''[http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51361#s19 A Topographical Dictionary of England]'' (1848), pp. 414-418. Adapted. Date accessed: 25 November 2013.</ref><br>  
  
 
The name Ulverston, first recorded in the [[Domesday Book]] (1086) as Ulvrestun probably means 'Úlfarr's farm' from the Old Norse personal name Úlfarr and tun, 'farm, homestead' or the equivalent Old English Wulfhere + tūn. The names Úlfarr and Wulfhere both translate roughly as 'wolf warrior' or 'wolf army', which explains the presence of a wolf on the town's coat of arms. The loss of the 'W' in Wulfhere can be attributed to the historic Scandinavian influence in the region. Locally, the town has traditionally been known as Oostan.] Other variations of the name recorded throughout history include Oluestonam (1127), and Uluereston (1189).  
 
The name Ulverston, first recorded in the [[Domesday Book]] (1086) as Ulvrestun probably means 'Úlfarr's farm' from the Old Norse personal name Úlfarr and tun, 'farm, homestead' or the equivalent Old English Wulfhere + tūn. The names Úlfarr and Wulfhere both translate roughly as 'wolf warrior' or 'wolf army', which explains the presence of a wolf on the town's coat of arms. The loss of the 'W' in Wulfhere can be attributed to the historic Scandinavian influence in the region. Locally, the town has traditionally been known as Oostan.] Other variations of the name recorded throughout history include Oluestonam (1127), and Uluereston (1189).  
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==== Probate records  ====
 
==== Probate records  ====
  
Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to [[Lancashire Probate Records|Lancashire Probate Records]] to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.
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Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to [[Lancashire Probate Records|Lancashire Probate Records]] to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.  
  
==== Taxation ====
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==== Taxation ====
  
*'''1665-1667''' - Lancashire Hearth Tax: Lonsdale Hundred, Subberthwaite. [http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/e179/default.asp E 179/132/352], The National Archives. Microfilm: {{FHL|988765|item|disp=FHL Film 2228692}}.
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*'''1665-1667''' - Lancashire Hearth Tax: Lonsdale Hundred, Ulverston. [http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/e179/default.asp E 179/132/352], The National Archives. Microfilm: {{FHL|988765|item|disp=FHL Film 2228692}}.
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*'''1665-1667''' - Lancashire Hearth Tax: Lonsdale Hundred, Subberthwaite. [http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/e179/default.asp E 179/132/352], The National Archives. Microfilm: {{FHL|988765|item|disp=FHL Film 2228692}}.
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*'''1665-1667''' - Lancashire Hearth Tax: Lonsdale Hundred, Osmotherley. [http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/e179/default.asp E 179/132/352], The National Archives. Microfilm: {{FHL|988765|item|disp=FHL Film 2228692}}.
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*'''1665-1667''' - Lancashire Hearth Tax: Lonsdale Hundred, Mansriggs. [http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/e179/default.asp E 179/132/352], The National Archives. Microfilm: {{FHL|988765|item|disp=FHL Film 2228692}}.
  
 
== Maps and Gazetteers  ==
 
== Maps and Gazetteers  ==
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== Reference  ==
 
== Reference  ==
  
{{reflist}}  
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{{reflist}} {{Lancashire}}  
{{Lancashire}}
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[[Category:Lancashire]]
 
[[Category:Lancashire]]

Revision as of 16:07, 25 November 2013

England Gotoarrow.png Lancashire Gotoarrow.png Lancashire Parishes

Guide to Ulverston St Mary, Lancashire family history and genealogy. Parish registers (baptism, christening, marriage, and burial records), civil registration (birth, marriage, and death records), census records, history, wills, cemetery, online transcriptions and indexes, an interactive map and websites.

See a Comprehensive List of Chapelries in Ulverston Parish

Ulverston St Mary Lancashire.JPG

Contents

Parish History

ULVERSTON (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster; containing, with the townships of Mansriggs, Osmotherley, and Subberthwaite, and the chapelries of Blawith, Church-Conistone, Egtonwith Newland, Lowick, and Torver. It lies 22 miles (N. W.) from Lancaster. This place derives its name, written in old records Olvestonam, from Ulpha, a Saxon lord; and was conferred in 1127, on the abbey of Furness, by Stephen, afterwards King of England.  Ulverston is a port within the port of Lancaster, and is little more than a mile distant from the Furness channel in Morecambe bay.  The parish was anciently included in the parish of Dalton. In the rural parts of the parish are five separate chapels. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics have places of worship; and Sunday schools in connexion both with the churches and meetinghouses afford religious instruction to a large number of children. There are, besides, auxiliaries of the Christian Knowledge, the British and Foreign Bible, the Gospel Propagation, the Church Missionary, and London and Wesleyan Missionary, Societies. The Friends meeting-house near Swarthmoor Hall is a plain structure: over the doorway is the inscription "Ex dono G. F. 1688. [1]

The name Ulverston, first recorded in the Domesday Book (1086) as Ulvrestun probably means 'Úlfarr's farm' from the Old Norse personal name Úlfarr and tun, 'farm, homestead' or the equivalent Old English Wulfhere + tūn. The names Úlfarr and Wulfhere both translate roughly as 'wolf warrior' or 'wolf army', which explains the presence of a wolf on the town's coat of arms. The loss of the 'W' in Wulfhere can be attributed to the historic Scandinavian influence in the region. Locally, the town has traditionally been known as Oostan.] Other variations of the name recorded throughout history include Oluestonam (1127), and Uluereston (1189).

The town's market charter was granted in 1280 by Edward I. This was for a market every Thursday; modern Ulverston keeps its old market town appearance, and market days are now held on both Thursdays and Saturdays. The charter also allowed for all public houses to open from 10:30 am until 11:00 pm irrespective of any other statute on the books. During the summer months the Saturday market day is themed with craft stalls, charity stalls and locally produced wares on "Made in Cumbria" stalls.

Historically, the ancient parish included several other chapelries or townships which later became separate civil parishes: Blawith, Church Coniston, Egton with Newland, Lowick, Mansriggs, Osmotherley, Subberthwaite and Torver. From 1894 to 1974 the town constituted an urban district in the administrative county of Lancashire. It became a successor parish in the Cumbria district of South Lakeland under the Local Government Act 1972.

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Lancashire Online Parish Clerks

An extremely useful resource for research in Lancashire Parishes http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/

Church records

Online Records

Ulverston St. Mary parish registers and those registers of all of its smaller chapelries lying within its boundaries have been mostly transcribed and are displayed online at the following web sites and ranges of years:

AC = Ancestry.co.uk (£)
FMP = FindMyPast.co.uk (£)
FREG = FreeReg
FS = FamilySearch.org
LBMD = LancashireBMD.org.uk
LOPC = Lancashire Online Parish Clerk
ULVERSTON ST MARY PARISH (1545) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1546-1910 1545-1914 1678-1903
LOPC 1771-1780, 1813-1841 1545-1617, 1771-1780, 1821-1841 1771-1780, 1814-1841
LBMD None None None
FMP None 1545-1837 None
ULVERSTON HOLY TRINITY Chapelry  (1832) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS None None None
LOPC 1866-1868 None 1864-1868
LBMD None None None
BLAWITH ST JOHN THE BAPTIST Chapelry  (1728) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1728-1837 None None
LOPC 1745-1875 1730-1837 1745-1875
LBMD None None None
FMP None 1730-1837 None
AC 1728-1837 1728-1837 1728-1837
CONISTON ST ANDREW Chapelry  (1599) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1599-1701, 1875-1880 1604-1700 1871-1881
LOPC 1690-1875 1690-1836, 1839-1855 1691-1810, 1813-1871
LBMD None None None
FMP None 1604-1836 None
AC 1599-1700 1599-1700 1599-1700
FREG 1599-1701 1604-1700 1600-1701
EGTON WITH NEWLAND Chapelry  (1813) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1813-1868 1856-1861 1813-1868
LOPC None None None
LBMD None None None
AC Various Years Various Years Various Years
LOWICK ST LUKE Chapelry  (1718) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1718-1873 1727-1872 1777-1873
LOPC 1777-1873 1778-1872 1778-1873
LBMD None None None
FMP None 1727-1837 None
AC 1718-1837 1718-1837 1718-1837
TORVER Chapelry  (1599) Indexes
Baptisms Marriages Burials
FS 1599-1792 1599-1785 None
LOPC None None None
LBMD None None None
FMP None 1599-1836 None
AC 1599-1792 1599-1792 1599-1792
Original Records

The Lancashire Record Office at Bow Lane, Preston PR2 1RE, holds the original parish registers in its vast collections. Contact their website for contact information.

The Family History Library has microfilmed the parish registers and Bishop's transcripts of Ulverston St. Mary parish for the years 1545-1914. These films are available for ordering/circulating and researching at any one of its satellite FamilySearch Centers worldwide.

Census records

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library. The first film number is 306916.


Poor Law Unions

Ulverston Poor Law Union,Lancashire

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Lancashire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Taxation

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

Reference

  1. Lewis, Samuel A., A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 414-418. Adapted. Date accessed: 25 November 2013.