Union County, North Carolina

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*[http://history.union.lib.nc.us/bibliographies/HistoryOfMonroe&UnionCo-twpOne-July2010-web.pdf History of Monroe and Union County]
  
 
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Revision as of 01:56, 12 January 2011


Union County, North Carolina
Map
Map of North Carolina highlighting Union County
Location in the state of North Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Carolina
Location of North Carolina in the U.S.
Facts
Founded 1842
County Seat Monroe
Courthouse
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United States  Gotoarrow.png  North Carolina  Gotoarrow.png  Union County

Contents

County Courthouse

History

Union County was established in 1842 from parts of Mecklenburg and Anson counties, and named "Union" as a compromise to settle a dispute between local Whigs and Democrats over whether the new county should be named "Clay" or "Jackson." Both of those names were subsequently used for new counties in the extreme southwestern part of the state.

Mecklenburg County and the large city of Charlotte are to the northwest. Charlotte's suburban areas include areas of Union County.

Anson County was one of the largest counties in NC at one time, and its territory covered the southwest quadrant of the state.

Monroe is the county seat for Union County. Other cities and towns are: Fairview, Hemby Bridge, Indian Trail, Lake Park, Marshville, Marvin, Mineral Springs, Stallings, Unionville, Waxhaw, Weddington, Wesley Chapel, and Wingate .

Townships are Goose Creek, Jackson, Marshville, Monroe, New Salem, Vance, Buford, Lanes Creek, Sandy Ridge.

Parent County

1842--Union County was created from Anson and Mecklenburg Counties.
County seat: Monroe [1]

Boundary Changes

Record Loss

Some of the early records are missing

Places/Localities

Populated Places

Neighboring Counties

Resources

Cemeteries

Church

Court

Land

Local Histories

Maps

Military

Newspapers

Probate

Taxation

Vital Records

Societies and Libraries 

Web Sites

References

  1. The Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America,10th ed. (Draper, UT:Everton Publishers, 2002).