United States, Public Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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{{FamilySearch_Collection
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{{Record_Search_article
 
|CID=CID2199956
 
|CID=CID2199956
|title=United States, Public Record Index
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|title=United States Public Records, 1970-2009
|location=United States }}<br>  
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|location=United States}} <br>  
  
 
== Record Description  ==
 
== Record Description  ==
  
This collection is an index of names, birth dates, addresses, phone numbers, and possible relatives of people who resided in the United States between 1970 and 2010. Not everyone who lived in the United States during this time will appear in the index. These records were generated from telephone directories, driver licenses, property tax assessments, credit applications, voter registration lists and other records available to the public. Birth information may be included for those residents born primarily between 1900 and 1990. These records have been gathered from multiple sources. The original sources are not available.  
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This collection is an index of names, birth dates, addresses, phone numbers, and possible relatives of people who resided in the United States between 1970 and 2009. Not everyone who lived in the United States during this time will appear in the index. These records were generated from telephone directories, property tax assessments, credit applications, and other records available to the public. Birth information may be included for those residents born primarily between 1900 and 1990.  
  
=== Citation for This Collection  ===
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These records have been gathered from multiple sources. The original sources are not available.  
 
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The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.
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{{Collection citation
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| text = “United States, Public Record Index, 1898-1994.” Index. ''FamilySearch.'' http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.}}
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[[United States, Public Record Index (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
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== Record Content  ==
 
== Record Content  ==
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*Address or residence  
 
*Address or residence  
 
*Birth date  
 
*Birth date  
*Phone numbers  
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*Phone numbers
*Possible relatives
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== How to Use the Record  ==
 
== How to Use the Record  ==
  
To search the collection by name fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:  
+
To search the collection by name fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your relatives to determine if this is related to you. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:  
  
 
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.  
 
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.  
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.  
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*You may not be sure of your own relative’s name.  
*Your ancestor may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
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*Your relative may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
  
 
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at [http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].  
 
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at [http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].  
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==== Using the Information  ====
 
==== Using the Information  ====
  
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. Extract the genealogical information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details. Add this new information to your records of each family. The information may also lead you to other records about your ancestors. The following examples show ways you can use the information:  
+
When you have located your relative’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details about your family. The information may also lead you to other records about your family. The following examples show ways you can use the information:  
  
*Use the residence information to find the family in census, church, and county records. <br>
 
*Use the possible relatives information to search in additional records.<br>
 
 
*Use the information to search for other collections in FamilySearch.org.<br>  
 
*Use the information to search for other collections in FamilySearch.org.<br>  
*Use the information to collaborate with family members to do genealogical research.&nbsp;
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*Use the information to collaborate with family members to do genealogical research.
  
 
==== Tips to Keep in Mind  ====
 
==== Tips to Keep in Mind  ====
  
*Continue to search the index and records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have lived nearby.
 
 
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.  
 
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.  
*You may need to compare the information of more than one family or person to make this determination.
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*If you are unable to locate other family members, check for variant spellings of their names.
  
==== Unable to Find Your Ancestor? ====
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==== Additional Information About This Collection ====
  
*Check for variant spellings of the names.  
+
In the United States, public records comprise an important class of genealogical sources. Public records are most often records collected and subsequently released by local, state, and federal government agencies. Many genealogists are familiar with public records such as the federal censuses and the Social Security death index. Other types of public records exist and often go underutilized by genealogists. Examples include county tax assessments, property liens, driver licenses, hunting licenses, civil and criminal court records, vehicle registrations, and voter registrations.  
*Search the records of nearby localities.
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In addition to public records generated by government agencies, corporations and private organizations also collect and disseminate records about individuals. Examples of these include telephone and address listings, credit applications, and membership directories.
 +
 
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Public records are most useful to genealogists by providing information about a person's residence, often with associated dates of residence—much like a census record. These “residence events” are critical clues and help a genealogist find other records about individuals and families as research can be more narrowly focused to specific counties, cities, and even neighborhoods. Public records databases often contain a conglomeration of many different public records sources and can be combined to reveal individuals who lived at a common address at the same time—giving clues to possible family relationships. Additionally, public records frequently contain telephone numbers and even birthdates. These records can be extremely helpful in placing individuals and families in time and locality and lead directly to the discovery of other sources such as cemetery, church, school, and vital records. Genealogists often use public records databases to identify and contact distant cousins for DNA research and kinship determination projects.  
  
 
== Related Websites  ==
 
== Related Websites  ==
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== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
  
[[United States]]  
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[[United States|United States]]  
  
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
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{{Contributor_invite}}  
 
{{Contributor_invite}}  
  
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
 
  
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.
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== Citations for This Collection ==
  
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
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When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.
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'''Collection Citation''':<br>
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{{Collection citation | text= "United States Public Records, 1970-2009." Index and Images. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing MyRelatives.com, a third party aggregator of publicly available information.}}
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'''Record Citation''' (or citation for the index entry):<br>
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{{Record Citation Link
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|CID=CID2199956
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|title=United States Public Records, 1970-2009
 +
}}

Latest revision as of 22:12, 10 February 2015

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

This collection is an index of names, birth dates, addresses, phone numbers, and possible relatives of people who resided in the United States between 1970 and 2009. Not everyone who lived in the United States during this time will appear in the index. These records were generated from telephone directories, property tax assessments, credit applications, and other records available to the public. Birth information may be included for those residents born primarily between 1900 and 1990.

These records have been gathered from multiple sources. The original sources are not available.

Record Content

The content varies by record. You may find any of the following:

  • Name
  • Name variations
  • Address or residence
  • Birth date
  • Phone numbers

How to Use the Record

To search the collection by name fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your relatives to determine if this is related to you. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own relative’s name.
  • Your relative may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at FamilySearch Search Tips.

Using the Information

When you have located your relative’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details about your family. The information may also lead you to other records about your family. The following examples show ways you can use the information:

  • Use the information to search for other collections in FamilySearch.org.
  • Use the information to collaborate with family members to do genealogical research.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
  • If you are unable to locate other family members, check for variant spellings of their names.

Additional Information About This Collection

In the United States, public records comprise an important class of genealogical sources. Public records are most often records collected and subsequently released by local, state, and federal government agencies. Many genealogists are familiar with public records such as the federal censuses and the Social Security death index. Other types of public records exist and often go underutilized by genealogists. Examples include county tax assessments, property liens, driver licenses, hunting licenses, civil and criminal court records, vehicle registrations, and voter registrations.

In addition to public records generated by government agencies, corporations and private organizations also collect and disseminate records about individuals. Examples of these include telephone and address listings, credit applications, and membership directories.

Public records are most useful to genealogists by providing information about a person's residence, often with associated dates of residence—much like a census record. These “residence events” are critical clues and help a genealogist find other records about individuals and families as research can be more narrowly focused to specific counties, cities, and even neighborhoods. Public records databases often contain a conglomeration of many different public records sources and can be combined to reveal individuals who lived at a common address at the same time—giving clues to possible family relationships. Additionally, public records frequently contain telephone numbers and even birthdates. These records can be extremely helpful in placing individuals and families in time and locality and lead directly to the discovery of other sources such as cemetery, church, school, and vital records. Genealogists often use public records databases to identify and contact distant cousins for DNA research and kinship determination projects.

Related Websites

United States Free Public Records Nationwide

Related Wiki Articles

United States

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. We are looking for additional information that will help readers understand the topic and better use the available records. We especially need language translations for both content and images. For specific needs, please look for callout boxes throughout the article or visit WikiProject FamilySearch Records.


Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.


Citations for This Collection

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.

Collection Citation:

"United States Public Records, 1970-2009." Index and Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing MyRelatives.com, a third party aggregator of publicly available information.

Record Citation (or citation for the index entry):

The citation for a record is available with each record in this collection, at the bottom of the record screen. You can search records in this collection by visiting the search page for United States Public Records, 1970-2009.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 10 February 2015, at 22:12.
  • This page has been accessed 38,028 times.