United States Census, 1860 (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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{{Record_Search_article|CID=CID1473181|title=United States Census, 1860|location=United States}} {{USCensus}}
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{{Record_Search_article
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|CID=CID1473181  
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|title=United States Census, 1860
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|location=United States}}<br>
  
== Collection Time Period<br> ==
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== Record Description  ==
  
The U.S. federal census was conducted each decade from 1790-present. This information pertains to censuses conducted in 1850, 1860, and 1870.  
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The collection consists of an index and images of population schedules listing inhabitants of the United States in 1860. This was the eighth census conducted since 1790. Currently, data is available for Alabama (96%), Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Dakota Territory, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania (99%), Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. All data and images have been provided by Footnote.com.  
  
== Record Description<br> ==
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For a list of records by localities currently published in this collection, select the [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1473181/waypoints Browse].
  
Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules were arranged by place, such as township or post office. The places were not filed in any particular order. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.
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=== Citation for This Collection  ===
  
=== Record Content<br> ===
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The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org. Source citations include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.
  
[[Image:1860 United States Census.jpg|thumb|right]] Important genealogical information in the 1850-1870 censuses:  
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{{Collection citation | text= "United States Census, 1860." Index. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.}}
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[[United States Census Population Schedules, 1860 (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
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== Record Content  ==
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<gallery perrow="3" heights="120px" widths="160px">
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Image:1860 United States Census.jpg|1860 United States Census
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</gallery>
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Information in the 1850-1870 censuses:  
  
 
*Full name  
 
*Full name  
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== How to Use the Records  ==
 
== How to Use the Records  ==
  
The U.S. federal census is the best source to quickly identify a family group and residence. Use the place of residence, and the birth state for each person along with his or her age to search for other record types. The census identifies other persons in the household and how they are related. The census may identify persons for whom other records do not exist.
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To begin your search it is helpful to know:
  
== Record History  ==
+
*Name of your ancestor
 +
*Other identifying information such as age and where they lived.
  
Federal census takers were asked to record information about all those who were in each household on the census day, which was 1 June. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Census Office in the Commerce Department in Washington D.C.&nbsp;The 1860 census covers 80-90% of the population.
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==== Search the Collection  ====
  
=== Why This Collection Was Created?  ===
+
To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. Keep in mind:
  
The U.S. federal census was taken at the beginning of every decade to apportion the number of representatives that a state could send to the House of Representatives in Congress. In the absence of a national system of vital registration, many vital statistics and personal questions were asked to provide a statistical profile of the nation and its states.  
+
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
 +
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
 +
*Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.  
 +
*If your ancestor used an alias or a nickname, be sure to check for those alternate names.
 +
*Even though these indexes are very accurate they may still contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
  
=== Record Reliability  ===
+
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at [http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].
  
Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.
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==== Using the Information ====
  
== Related Web Sites  ==
+
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. Download a copy of the record, or extract the genealogical information needed. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details. Add this new information to your records of each family. The information may also lead you to other records about your ancestors. The following examples show ways you can use the information:
  
This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here.  
+
*Use the estimated age to calculate a birth date.  
 +
*Use the age and residence to locate the family in church and land records.
  
== Related Wiki Articles ==
+
==== Tips to Keep in Mind ====
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/United_States_Federal_Census United States Federal Census]
+
*Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have lived nearby.  
 +
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
 +
*You may need to compare the information of more than one family or person to make this determination.
 +
*Be aware that, as with any index, transcription errors may occur.
  
== Contributions to This Article ==
+
==== Unable to Find Your Ancestor? ====
  
{{Contributor invite}}
+
*Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.
 +
*Search the indexes and records of nearby localities.
 +
*Try alternative search methods such as only filling in the surname search box (or the given name search box) on the landing page leaving the other box empty and then click on search. This should return a list of everyone with that particular name. You could then browse the list for individuals with the same family number.
 +
*There is also the possibility that a family was missed in the census.
  
==== Style Guide ====
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==== General Information About These Records ====
  
For guidelines to use in creating wiki articles that describe collections of images and indexes produced by FamilySearch, see: [[FamilySearch Wiki:Guidelines for FamilySearch Collections pages|FamilySearch Wiki: Guidelines for FamilySearch Collections pages]]
+
The U.S. federal census was conducted each decade from 1790-present. This information pertains to censuses conducted in 1850, 1860, and 1870.
  
== Sources of Information for This Collection:  ==
+
Federal census takers were asked to record information about all those who were in each household on the census day, which was 1 June. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Census Office in the Commerce Department in Washington D.C.
  
<!--bibdescbegin-->"U.S. Census&nbsp;Population Schedule, 1860" database, FamilySearch; (http://familysearch.org), from United States Census Office. 8th Census. Digital images of originals housed at the National Archives, Washington, D.C.. FHL microfilm. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. <!--bibdescend-->
+
The U.S. federal census was taken at the beginning of every decade to apportion the number of representatives that a state could send to the House of Representatives in Congress. In the absence of a national system of vital registration, many vital statistics and personal questions were asked to provide a statistical profile of the nation and its states.  
  
<br>The format for citing FamilySearch Historical Collections, including how to cite individual archives is found in the following link: [[How to Create Source Citations For FamilySearch Historical Records Collections|How to Create Source Citations for FamilySearch Historical Records Collections]]
+
Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules were arranged by place, such as township or post office. The places were not filed in any particular order. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.
  
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
+
Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.
  
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the Wiki Article: [[How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]]
+
{{USCensus}}
  
Please add sample citations to this article following the format guidelines in the wiki article listed above.
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== Known Issues with This Collection  ==
  
=== Examples of Sourch Citations for a Record in This Collection  ===
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{{HR Known Issues}}For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached [[United States Census, 1860 (FamilySearch Historical Records)/Known Issues|Wiki article]]. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to [mailto:support@familysearch.org support@familysearch.org]. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.
  
*United States. Bureau of Census. 12th census, 1900, digital images, From Family Searc Internet ([http://www.familysearch.org www.familysearch.org]: Setpemper 29.2006), Arizona Territory, Maricopa, Township 1, East Gila, Salt River Base and Meridian; sheet 9B,line 71.
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== Related Websites  ==
*Mexico, Districto Federal, Catholic Church Records 1886-1933, digital imagbes, from FamilySearch Internet ([http://www.familysearch.org www.familysearch.org]: April 22, 2010), Baptism of Adolfo Femandez Jimenez, 1 Feb, 1910, San Pedro Apostol, Cuahimalpa, Districto Federal, Mexico Film number 0227023
+
  
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*[http://www.censusfinder.com/1860-census.htm 1860 Census Questions]
 +
*[http://www.censusfinder.com Census Finder]
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*[http://www.census-online.com/links/ United States Census Online]
 +
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== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 +
 +
*[[United States Federal Census]]
 +
*[[United States Census 1860]]
 +
 +
== Contributions to This Article  ==
 +
 +
{{Contributor_invite}}
 +
 +
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
  
 +
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.
  
 +
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
  
 
[[Category:United_States_Census|1860]]
 
[[Category:United_States_Census|1860]]

Revision as of 16:52, 23 September 2013

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.
Access the records: United States Census, 1860 .

Contents

Record Description

The collection consists of an index and images of population schedules listing inhabitants of the United States in 1860. This was the eighth census conducted since 1790. Currently, data is available for Alabama (96%), Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Dakota Territory, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania (99%), Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. All data and images have been provided by Footnote.com.

For a list of records by localities currently published in this collection, select the Browse.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org. Source citations include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

"United States Census, 1860." Index. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.

Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.

Record Content

Information in the 1850-1870 censuses:

  • Full name
  • Age (can be used to approximate birth year)
  • Sex
  • Race
  • Birthplace
  • Occupation
  • Whether married during the previous year
  • Town, township, or post office of residence

In addition the 1870 census recorded:

  • Month of birth if born during the previous year
  • Month of marriage if married during the previous year
  • Whether the father and mother of each person was born in a foreign country

How to Use the Records

To begin your search it is helpful to know:

  • Name of your ancestor
  • Other identifying information such as age and where they lived.

Search the Collection

To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.
  • If your ancestor used an alias or a nickname, be sure to check for those alternate names.
  • Even though these indexes are very accurate they may still contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at FamilySearch Search Tips.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. Download a copy of the record, or extract the genealogical information needed. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details. Add this new information to your records of each family. The information may also lead you to other records about your ancestors. The following examples show ways you can use the information:

  • Use the estimated age to calculate a birth date.
  • Use the age and residence to locate the family in church and land records.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have lived nearby.
  • When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
  • You may need to compare the information of more than one family or person to make this determination.
  • Be aware that, as with any index, transcription errors may occur.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.
  • Search the indexes and records of nearby localities.
  • Try alternative search methods such as only filling in the surname search box (or the given name search box) on the landing page leaving the other box empty and then click on search. This should return a list of everyone with that particular name. You could then browse the list for individuals with the same family number.
  • There is also the possibility that a family was missed in the census.

General Information About These Records

The U.S. federal census was conducted each decade from 1790-present. This information pertains to censuses conducted in 1850, 1860, and 1870.

Federal census takers were asked to record information about all those who were in each household on the census day, which was 1 June. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Census Office in the Commerce Department in Washington D.C.

The U.S. federal census was taken at the beginning of every decade to apportion the number of representatives that a state could send to the House of Representatives in Congress. In the absence of a national system of vital registration, many vital statistics and personal questions were asked to provide a statistical profile of the nation and its states.

Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules were arranged by place, such as township or post office. The places were not filed in any particular order. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.


Known Issues with This Collection

Important.png Problems with this collection?
See a list of known issues, workarounds, tips, restrictions, future fixes, news and other helpful information.

For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached Wiki article. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to support@familysearch.org. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.