Upper Road

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''[[United States|United States]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[United States Migration Internal|Migration]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[US Migration Trails and Roads|Trails and Roads]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Fall Line Road|Fall Line Road]]''  
 
''[[United States|United States]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[United States Migration Internal|Migration]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[US Migration Trails and Roads|Trails and Roads]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Fall Line Road|Fall Line Road]]''  
  
The '''Upper Road''' or "Piedmont Road" splits off from the [[King's Highway]] at Fredericksburg, Virginia. It is roughly parallel to, but farther inland than the [[Fall Line Road]] until it rejoined that road at Macon, Georgia. The Upper Road was especially popular among the Scots-Irish (or Ulster Irish) colonists who settled the backcountry mountains. In Virginia there is no modern equivalent road because reservoirs now cover the old trail. Interstate 85 is roughly the same as the Upper Road in the Carolinas.<ref name="BWhit">Beverly Whitaker, "The Upper Road" (1995) in ''Genealogy Tutor'' at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gentutor/upper.pdf (accessed 24 January 2011).</ref>  
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The '''Upper Road''' or "Piedmont Road" splits off from the [[King's Highway]] at Fredericksburg, Virginia. It is roughly parallel to, but farther inland than the coastal [[King's Highway]] and [[Fall Line Road]] until it rejoined that later road at Macon, Georgia. The Upper Road was especially popular among the Scots-Irish (or Ulster Irish) colonists who settled the backcountry mountains. In Virginia there is no modern equivalent road because reservoirs now cover the old trail. Interstate 85 is roughly the same as the Upper Road in the Carolinas.<ref name="BWhit">Beverly Whitaker, "The Upper Road" (1995) in ''Genealogy Tutor'' at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gentutor/upper.pdf (accessed 24 January 2011).</ref>  
  
 
As roads developed in America settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the roads provided access to markets. They could sell their products at distant markets, and buy products made far away. If an ancestor settled near a road, you may be able to trace back to a place of origin on a connecting highway.  
 
As roads developed in America settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the roads provided access to markets. They could sell their products at distant markets, and buy products made far away. If an ancestor settled near a road, you may be able to trace back to a place of origin on a connecting highway.  

Revision as of 13:55, 24 January 2011

United States  Gotoarrow.png  Migration  Gotoarrow.png  Trails and Roads  Gotoarrow.png  Fall Line Road

The Upper Road or "Piedmont Road" splits off from the King's Highway at Fredericksburg, Virginia. It is roughly parallel to, but farther inland than the coastal King's Highway and Fall Line Road until it rejoined that later road at Macon, Georgia. The Upper Road was especially popular among the Scots-Irish (or Ulster Irish) colonists who settled the backcountry mountains. In Virginia there is no modern equivalent road because reservoirs now cover the old trail. Interstate 85 is roughly the same as the Upper Road in the Carolinas.[1]

As roads developed in America settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the roads provided access to markets. They could sell their products at distant markets, and buy products made far away. If an ancestor settled near a road, you may be able to trace back to a place of origin on a connecting highway.

Contents

Historical Background

a

Route

Colonial Roads in the South.png
Fredericksburg, VA Hillsboro, NC Salisbury, NC Charlotte, NC Spartanburg, SC Greenville, SC It passed through the current Virginia counties of Spotsylvania, Louisa, Goochland, Powhatan, Amelia, Nottoway, Lunenburg, and Mecklenburg. From the North Carolina line, it is nearly the same as Interstate 85 and continues into South Carolina.[1]

Settlers and Records

a

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 Beverly Whitaker, "The Upper Road" (1995) in Genealogy Tutor at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gentutor/upper.pdf (accessed 24 January 2011).