User:Jenson1/sandbox

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<br>This road was the first road to cross overland through the Appalachian Mountains. Major Gereral Edward Braddock was given orders by the British goverment to widen the road which had started to be covered over with follage.The road was used very littled during the Revolutionary War. Barddock took 600 soldiers to work the old road, The road need to be wide enough to accommodate wagons and animals, as well as the siege artilery that they brought alongyo use agaibst For Duquesne. In 1755 they set out from Fort Cumberland through Maryland to Fort Duquesne. The Gereral's axe men cut a 12-foot road through the trees.The road when throught Maryland and Pennsylvania to the Potomac River at Cumberland, Maryland, with the Monongahela River at Turtle Creek which is Pittsburgh, Pennsyvania now.
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<br>This road was the first road to cross overland through the Appalachian Mountains. Major General Edward Braddock was given orders by the British government to widen the road which had started to be covered over with foliageThe road was used very little during the Revolutionary War. Braddock took 600 soldiers to work the old road, The road need to be wide enough to accommodate wagons and animals, as well as the siege artilery that they brought along use against For Duquesne. In 1755 they set out from Fort Cumberland through Maryland to Fort Duquesne. The General's axe men cut a 12-foot road through the trees. The road when through Maryland and Pennsylvania to the Potomac River at Cumberland, Maryland, with the Monongahela River at Turtle Creek which is Pittsburgh, Pennsyvania now.

Revision as of 21:06, 25 January 2013

 Historical Braddock's Road


Cumberland md braddock road.jpg





This road was the first road to cross overland through the Appalachian Mountains. Major General Edward Braddock was given orders by the British government to widen the road which had started to be covered over with foliageThe road was used very little during the Revolutionary War. Braddock took 600 soldiers to work the old road, The road need to be wide enough to accommodate wagons and animals, as well as the siege artilery that they brought along use against For Duquesne. In 1755 they set out from Fort Cumberland through Maryland to Fort Duquesne. The General's axe men cut a 12-foot road through the trees. The road when through Maryland and Pennsylvania to the Potomac River at Cumberland, Maryland, with the Monongahela River at Turtle Creek which is Pittsburgh, Pennsyvania now.