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The original content for this article was contributed by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies in June 2012. It is an excerpt from their course Methodology - Part 1: Getting Started, Methodology - Part 2: Organizing and Skillbuilding, Methodology - Part 3: More Strategies, Methodology - Part 4: Effective Searching and Recording, Methodology - Part 5: How To Prove It, and Methodology - Part 6: Professional Preparation and Practice  by Louise St Denis, Brenda Dougall Merriman and Dr. Penelope Christensen. The Institute offers over 200 comprehensive genealogy courses for a fee ($).

References

Section 929 at your local public library is the main one to consult for how-to books, both on the regular shelves and in the Reference Section. Here are a few worth looking out for, but there are many others on various ethnic backgrounds and specialized subjects.

  • American Association of Museums. The Official Museum Directory. Annual. Has large Classified Buyer's Guide listing USA suppliers.


  • Amsden, Peter. 1999. Basic Approach to Making Contact with Relatives. Federation of Family History Societies, Bury, Lancashire, England.


  • Barrow, G.B. 1977. The Genealogist’s Guide: An Index to Printed British Pedigrees and Family Histories 1950-1975, Being a Supplement to G.W. Marshall’s ‘Genealogist’s Guide' and J.B. Whitmore’s ‘Genealogical Guide’. Research Publishing Company. GSU fiche 6026284 (3).


  • Baun, Willa K. 1977. Transcribing and Editing Oral History. American Assoc. for State & Local History, Nashville, Tennessee.


  • Baxter, Angus. 2001. In Search of Your Canadian Roots. McMillan, Toronto.


  • Bennett, Maura. 1996. “Family Threads―Family Heirlooms Exhibition 1995.” Family History News & Digest Vol. 10, #3, page 103-104.


  • Bentley, Elizabeth Petty. Current edition. The Genealogists Address Book. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland.


  • Blanchard, John. 2001. “How our Web-on-a-Disk Beats “Raid and Run” on a Society’s Website.” Journal of One-Name Studies Vol. 7, #8, page 9-10.


  • Bloom, B.S. (editor) 1956. The Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Handbook 1: The Cognitive Domain. Longmans.


  • Board For Certification of Genealogists. 2000. The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual. Ancestry Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah.


  • Bourrie, Doris. 1998. HELP! There's a Skeleton in my Closet. Heritage Productions.


  • Briggs, Elizabeth. 1995. Access to Ancestry: A Genealogical Resource Manual for Canadians Tracing their Heritage.


  • Brown, Hugo. 2003. “Hit the Brick Wall: Solutions for the Stymied Searchers.” Family Tree Magazine Vol. 19, #6, page 21-22.


  • Callaghan, Sue. 2001. 5th edition. “On the Use and Abuse of Books.” The Family & Local History Handbook. Genealogical Services Directory.


  • Case,  Patricia A. 1977. How to Write Your Autobiography. Woodbridge Press, Santa Barbara, California.


  • CavellL, Jane. 2002. “Photographs.” Computer Section, Family Tree Magazine Vol. 18, #7, page 41-42.


  • Cavell, Jane. 2002. “Internet Sources: Charts & Forms” Computer section, Family Tree Magazine Vol. 19, #2, page 40.


  • Cavell, Jane. 2003. “Internet Sources: Dates and Calendars”. Family Tree Magazine Vol. 19, #6, page 39-40.


  • Chapman, Colin R. 1996. Tracing Your British Ancestors. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland.


  • Cole, Jean and TITFORD, John. 1997. Tracing Your Family Tree. Countryside Books.


  • Clippingdale, Jack. 1999. “Mission Uncovered.” Cockney Ancestor (East of London FHS). #84, page 20-22.


  • Colletta, John Philip. 2000. Only a Few Bones: A True Account of the Rolling Fork Tragedy and its Aftermath. Direct Descent, Washington, DC.
  • Colloff, John. 1999. “Archiving” Computer Section,Family Tree Magazine Vol. 15, #10, page 29-30.


  • Cory, Kathleen B. 1996. Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry. Macmillan, Canada.


  • Curran, Joan Ferris, CRANE, Madilyn Coen and WRAY, John H. 2000.Numbering Your Genealogy: Basic Systems, Complex Families and International Kin. National Genealogical Society, Arlington, Virginia.


  • Douglas, Althea. 1998-9.Help! I've Inherited an Attic Full of History: A Guide for Genealogists―and others―on Ways to Hand the Past on to the Future. Volume 1: Dating, Evaluating and Disposing of the Accumulation of a Lifetime (1998). Volume II: Archival Conservation in the Home Environment (1999). Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto, Ontario.


  • Dryden, Jean E. 1982. Images in Time: A Basic Guide to the Processing and Preservation of Historical Photographs. ACCESS, Edmonton.


  • Dummer, Michael. 2001.“Transferring the Family Files from Paper and Computer onto CD-ROM.” Journal of One-Name Studies Vol. 7, #8, page 6-9.


  • Eastman, Dick. 2004. “How to Create Your Own DVD and VCD Disks.” Ontario Genealogical Society Seminar Syllabus 2004.


  • Emmison, F.G. 1967. How to Read Local Archives 1550-1700. The Historical Association, London, England.


  • Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Research Outlines on various countries, provinces and states. For details check on the FamilySearch Wiki.


  • Federation of Family History Societies have published dozens of excellent, inexpensive and up-to-date guides for mainly English and Welsh research.


  • Ferguson, Joan P.S., Smith, Denis and Wellburn, Peter. 1986. 2nd edition. Scottish Family Histories Held in Scottish Libraries. National Library of Scotland.


  • Fitzhugh, Terrick. 1988. How to Write a Family History. Alphabooks, London, England.


  • Fitzhugh, Terrick (edited by Susan Lumas). 1998. Dictionary of Genealogy. Alphabooks, London, England.


  • Fowler, Simon. 1999. “SoG Welcomes Your Research!” Genealogists’ Magazine Vol. 26, #8, page 304-306.


  • Gibson, J. and Peskett, P. 1998. (Current edition). Record Offices: How to Find Them. FFHS (Britain.)


  • Goacher, Roger and Heskins, Janet. 2003. Will Codicil in Members’ Handbook. Guild of One-Name Studies, London, England.


  • Greenwood, Val. D. 3rd edition. 2000. The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland.


  • Haley, Alex. 1976. Roots. Doubleday & Company, Garden City, New York.


  • Hallman, Anita Young. 1997. Self-Preservation. Deseret Book Co.


  • Hanowski, Laura M. 2000. Tracing Your Saskatchewan Ancestors: A Guide to the Records and How to Use Them. Saskatchewan Genealogical Society.


  • Hatcher, Patricia Law. 1996. Producing a Quality Family History. Ancestry Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah.


  • Hawkins, Brenda. 1995. “Book Reviews.” East Surrey Family History Society Journal Vol. 18, #4, page 32.


  • Herber, Mark D. 1997. Ancestral Trails: The Complete Guide to British Genealogy & Family History. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland.


  • Hill, C.W. 1991. “Picture Postcards.” Shire Album. Shire Publications.


  • Houston, J. Richard. 1979.Numbering the Survivors: A History of the Standish Family of Ireland, Ontario and Alberta. Generation Press, Toronto, Ontario.


  • Humphrey-Smith, C.R. 1995. The Phillimore Atlas & Index of Parish Registers: England, Wales & Scotland. Phillimore, Chichester, Sussex.


  • Irvine, Sherry and Hinckley, Kathleen. 2002. “Client & Professional: Make the Relationship Work.” Everton’s Family History Magazine Vol. 56, #5, page 120-121.


  • Jonassaon, Eric. 1978. The Canadian Genealogical Handbook. Wheatfield Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba.


  • Kaminkow, Marion J. 1987. 2 volumes & 2 supplements. Genealogies in the Library of Congress: A Bibliography. Magna Carta Book Company, Baltimore, Maryland.


  • Karcich, Grant. 2007. Finding Your Italian Ancestors. Heritage Productions.


  • Lackey, Richard S. 1980. Cite Your Sources. Polyanthos Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana.


  • Landrey, Gregory J. (editor). The Winterthur Guide to Caring for Your Collection. Winterthur Decorative Arts Series.


  • Lansdell, Avril. 1985.Fashion A La Carte 1860-1900. Shire Publications.


  • Lemieux, Victoria and Leonard, David. 1992. Tracing Your Ancestors in Alberta. Lemieux/Leonard Research Associates, Edmonton, Alberta.


  • Long, Richard W. and Long, Jane. Caring for Your Family Treasures. Heritage Preservation Publications. Harry Abrams Inc.


  • Maclysaght, Edward. 1985. Irish Families – Their Names, Arms & Origins. Irish Academic Press, Dublin. (and further titles in this series: More Irish Families, etc.)


  • Maclysaght, Edward. 1985. 6th edition. The Surnames of Ireland. Irish Academic Press.


  • Marshall, G.W. 1902. The Genealogist’s Guide. Reprinted 1967 by Heraldry Today. Reprinted 1973 by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. GSU film 0496451.


  • McCracken, Jane. 1974. Oral History-Basic Techniques. Manitoba Museum of Man & Nature.


  • McLaughlin, Eve. 1988. Laying Out a Pedigree. Federation of Family History Societies, Bury, Lancashire, England.


  • McLaughlin, Eve. 1988. Simple Latin for Family Historians. Federation of Family History Societies, Bury, Lancashire, England.


  • Merriman, Brenda Dougall. 2008. 4th edition. Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records. Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto.


  • Merriman, Brenda Dougall. 2010. Genealogical Standards of Evidence: A Guide for Family Historians. Dundurn, Toronto, Ontario.


  • Meyerink, Kory L. (editor). 1998. Printed Sources: A Guide to Published Genealogical Records. Ancestry Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.


  • Mills, Elizabeth Shown. 1997. Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.


  • Mills, Elizabeth Shown. 2007. Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.


  • Morris, Susan. 1986. “The Folklore of Genealogy.” Genealogists’ Magazine Vol. 22, #4, page 139-143.


  • Museum Association [of UK]. Annual. Museums & Galleries Yearbook. Has list of museums and art galleries who can advise on preservation and restoration.


  • Parkinson, Colin. 2001. 5th edition. Plastic―That Will Do Nicely! in The Family & Local History Handbook. Genealogical Services Directory.


  • Paulson, Deirdre and English, Jeanne. Preserving the Precious. Preservation Source, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.


  • Piggin, Jean-Baptiste and Hansen, Linda. 1999. “Writing Cold to Strangers and the Best Way to Go about It.” Journal of One-Name Studies Vol. 6, #11, page 244-245.


  • Player-Dahnsjo, Ylva. “Looking After Stuff.” Practical Family History 2001, #48, page 11-12.


  • Pols, Robert. 1994. Dating Old Photographs. Federation of Family History Societies, Bury, Lancashire, England.


  • Pols, Robert. 1995. Understanding Old Photographs. Robert Boyd Publications.


  • Pritchard, Michael. 1994. A Directory of London Photographers 1841-1908. PhotoResearch, Watford, Hertfordshire, England.


  • Province of British Columbia. 1998. Genealogical Resources for British Columbians. BC Vital Statistics Agency.


  • Punch, Terence M. 1998. Genealogical Research in Nova Scotia. Petheric Press, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.


  • Punch, Terence M. and SANBORN, George F. 1997. 2nd edition. Genealogists Handbook for Atlantic Canada Research. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.


  • Rickard, Gillian. 1998. “Disaster Training in Family History Happenings.”Kent Family History Journal Vol. 8, #12, page 589.


  • Rogers, Colin D. 1998. 3rd edition. The Family Tree Detective. Manchester University Press.
  • Secol LTD. 2002. 6th edition.Bringing the Past to Light in The Family & Local History Handbook. Genealogical Services Directory.
  • Sperry, Kip. 2002. Revised edition. Reading Early American Handwriting. Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • ST Denis, Louise. 1997.Ask Lots of Questions, Get Lots of Answers. Heritage Productions.
  • Steel, Don. 1979. Discovering Your Family History. British Broadcasting Corporation. This is the classic description of the Honeycombe family research that was televised in Britain and launched thousands more genealogies a few years after Alex Haley’s Roots in the USA.
  • Stuart, Margaret and Paul, James Balfour. 1930. Scottish Family History: A Guide to the Works of Reference on the History & Genealogy of Scottish Families. Oliver & Boyd. Reprinted 1994 by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. [GSU book 941.A3s]
  • Tanner, Andrea. 2002. “The Best Laid Plans: Peter le Neve and his Misappropriated Manuscripts.” Genealogists’ Magazine Vol. 27, #5, page 208-213.
  • Taylor, Ryan. 2000. Books You Need to do Genealogy in Ontario: An Annotated Bibliography. Round Tower Books, Fort Wayne, Indiana.
  • Thomson, T.R. 1976. 3rd edition. A Catalogue of British Family Histories. Research Publishing Company.
  • Tippey, David. 2001. 5th edition. Do I Really Need a Computer? What Exactly Will It Do for Me? in The Family & Local History Handbook. Genealogical Services Directory.
  • Titford, John. 1996. Writing and Publishing Your Family History. Federation of Family History Societies, Bury, Lancashire, England.
  • Todd, Andrew. 1987. Basic Sources for Family History 1. Back to the Early 1800s. Allen & Todd, Bury, Lancashire, England.
  • Tuttle, Craig A. 1994. An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers & Photographs. Rainbow Books.
  • Valentine, Jill. 1995. “Threads of Family History.” Family Tree Magazine Vol. 12, #1, page 56-57.
  • Wagner, Anthony. 1983. English Genealogy. Phillimore, Chichester, Sussex.
  • Webb, Clifford. 1989. Dates & Calendars for the Genealogist. Society of Genealogists.
  • Whitmore, J.B. 1953. A Genealogical Guide: An Index to British Pedigrees in Continuation of Marshall’s ‘Genealogist’s Guide’. Society of Genealogists. GSU fiche 6054492 (8) but at present ‘withdrawn from circulation’.
  • Williams, Patricia. 1999. Once Upon a Lifetime. Time Broker.

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Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online courses Methodology - Part 1: Getting Started, Methodology - Part 2: Organizing and Skillbuilding, Methodology - Part 3: More Strategies, Methodology - Part 4: Effective Searching and Recording, Methodology - Part 5: How To Prove It, and Methodology - Part 6: Professional Preparation and Practice offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. To learn more about these courses or other courses available from the Institute, see our website. We can be contacted at wiki@genealogicalstudies.com