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Gotoarrow.png Wales Gotoarrow.png Families Database

This Welsh database, when complete, will include lineage linked data for approximately 350,000 individuals, living from about 100 A.D. to 1700 A.D. See FamilySearch Community Trees to do a search.


Base Data

The starting point for the Welsh database is Peter C. Bartrum’s two volumes, Welsh Genealogies 300 – 1400and Welsh Genealogies 1400 – 1500, and his corrections and additions to these works. There are approximately 63,000 names entered from Bartrum’s volumes. As of March 2008 the file has 234,342 individuals, covering a period from about 100 A.D. to 1700 A.D.

Dating Methods

Peter C. Bartrum used a generational system for estimating dates. This method has been continued as additional sources have been added to the database. When an actual date (example: age 6 in 1584) is known it is placed in the file as “birth: cal 1578”. If the individual has siblings, the siblings are left in the generational dating format until a more precise date is available. Eventually everyone prior to 1700 will be dated, whether by generational or conventional dating methods. When known dates are too far apart, extra generations have been added to fill the gaps.

[The value of the generational dating method has been confirmed in several instances where the actual date has been found. The method has also been useful to prove or disprove marriage and parentage links. Some links claimed in the sources have been shown to be hundreds of years apart using this method.]

Unknown Names

An individual who is identified in a source, but is not named, appears in the file as “[unknown]”. Examples would be an individual who is the heiress/heir of a specific estate, or an unnamed spouse. Also, unnamed mistresses have been entered “[mistress 1]”, “[mistress 2]”, etc.

Name Strings/Identifiers/Cognomens

Patronymics, identifiers, and cognomens are included in one name string and placed in the given name field. Identifiers or cognomens are set apart in quotation marks (for example: “Llwyd”, “Gôch”, “Fychan”, etc.). [We have encountered instances in the sources where identifiers or cognomens have been added in error as separate individuals.]


All three terms are used to signify “daughter of”. All are correct but are used in different time periods. Rather than trying to decide which is the correct spelling for each time period, we have chosen to use “ferch” as the patronymic naming convention for females.

Ap and Ab

Ap and ab are used in male patronymics. If the father’s given name starts with a vowel, “ab” is used; if it starts with a consonant, “ap” is used (for example: Gruffud ab Iwuan, Gruffudd ap Rhys).


Following Bartrum’s practice, given names and surnames are entered in the vernacular rather in English translation. Sometimes it has been difficult to identify the vernacular, especially with Irish or Danish names and with names pertaining to the Marches of Wales. Standard spelling has been used for names prior to 1700. After 1700 patronymics are standardized but other names are given as shown in the source. Alternate spellings are entered as AKAs (which at present can only be viewed in the Deluxe Version of Legacy Family Tree). Examples are: Gruffudd rather than Griffith, Rhys rather than Rice, Ieuan rather and Evan, Catrin rather than Catherine or Katherine.


If a surname has not been established for at least two generations, it has been treated as an alias. Examples are: Harry ab William (alias Harry Williams), 2nd generation Robert ap Harry (alias Robert Parry). Brothers may go by different surnames. There are instances where “ap” is retained as part of the surname. If an established surname is dropped or added (as in the requirement to inherit estates), the term “formerly” is used to show the former surname. For example: William Ap Rhys, Harry ab William (alias Harry Williams, Walter Hopkins (formerly Walter ap Hopkins), Walter Jones (alias Walter Spicer), William Addams-Williams (formerly William Addams).

Tribal Designations

Because of the frequent occurrence of identical name strings, we have continued Bartrum’s practice of including tribal designations. Tribal designations are recorded in the christening place field set off by curly brackets. Irish tribes in the file are further identified by “Clan” or “Sept” names. Examples are: {Marchudd}, {Einion ap Llywarch}, {Ui Néill, Sept Conaill Cremthainni}.

Locality Names

Locality names are in the Welsh vernacular. Locality notes include alternate spellings and English translations.

General Notes

General notes include source references and historical information. Notes are also used to point out conflicts or errors that occur in the sources. Tags, which are in CAPS, are used to identify the nature of the information in each note.

Project Sources

Source Title Volume Pages  % Done
Bradney, History of Monmouthshire vol. 1 pt. 1 144 100%
vol. 1 pt. 2 333 100%
vol. 2 pt. 1 128 100%
vol. 2 pt. 2
vol. 3 pt. 1
vol. 3 pt. 2
vol. 4 pt. 1
vol. 4 pt. 2
Bartrum, WG 300-1400 12 vols. 945 100%
Bartrum, WG 1400-1500 10 vols. 1776 100%
Dwnn, Visitation of Wales 2 vols. 698 100%
Griffith, Anglesey and Caernarvon 400 100%
Lloyd, Powys Fadog 6 vols. 2621 100%
Griffith, Pedigrees of Gentlemen 87 100%
Evans, British Genealogist 8 books 1141 95%
Bartrum, WG Additions and Correct. 8 books 844 95%
TIB Cards 75%
Golden Grove MSS 21 books 2588 20%
book 4 150 100%
book 5 154 100%
book 6 88 40%
book 7 91 60%
Bartrum, Early Welsh Tracts 50%
Castell Gorfud MS 154 20%
Llyfyr Baglan 385 10%
History of Cardigan
History of Brecknock 10%
Phillips, Glamorgan Pedigrees 51 10%
Visitation of Shropshire 2 vols. 520 10%
Morris, Shropshire Genealogies 10 vols. 20%
History of Cheshire 10%
Visitation of Herefordshire 10%
Manors of Herefordshire
Location File


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