West Virginia Naturalization Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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{{Collection_Browse_Link
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|CID=CID1909003
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|title=West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991
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== Record Content  ==
 
== Record Content  ==
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The following information is usually found in naturalization records:  
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The following information is usually found in '''naturalization records''':  
  
 
*Name  
 
*Name  
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If you do not know this information, check the 1900 census and then calculate the possible year of naturalization based on the date of immigration. The 1920 census may tell you the exact year of immigration or naturalization.  
 
If you do not know this information, check the 1900 census and then calculate the possible year of naturalization based on the date of immigration. The 1920 census may tell you the exact year of immigration or naturalization.  
  
=== Search the Collection ===
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=== Search the Collection ===
  
To search the collection fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:
+
To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person.  
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
+
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
+
*Your ancestor may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
+
*If your ancestor used an alias or a nickname, be sure to check for those alternate names.
+
*Even though these indexes are very accurate they may still contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.
+
  
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at
+
If you did not find the person you were looking for, you may need to search the collection by image. <br>⇒Select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page<br>⇒Select the "County" category<br>⇒Select the "Record Type, Date Range and Value" category which takes you to the images
[http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].
+
  
=== Using the Information ===
+
Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.
 +
 
 +
With either search keep in mind:
 +
 
 +
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
 +
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
 +
*Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.
 +
 
 +
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article [[FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks]].
 +
 
 +
=== Using the Information ===
  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family.  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family.  
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*Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.
 
*Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.
  
=== Tips to Keep in Mind ===
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=== Tips to Keep in Mind ===
  
 
*Look for the Declaration of Intent soon after the immigrant arrived, and then look for the Naturalization Petition five years later, when the residency requirement would have been met. Look for naturalization records in federal courts and then in state, county, or city courts.  
 
*Look for the Declaration of Intent soon after the immigrant arrived, and then look for the Naturalization Petition five years later, when the residency requirement would have been met. Look for naturalization records in federal courts and then in state, county, or city courts.  
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=== Unable to Find Your Ancestor?  ===
 
=== Unable to Find Your Ancestor?  ===
  
*Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.
+
*Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.  
 
*Try alternative search methods such as only filling in the surname search box (or the given name search box) on the landing page leaving the other box empty and then click on search. This should return a list of everyone with that particular name. You could then browse the list for individuals that may be your ancestor.  
 
*Try alternative search methods such as only filling in the surname search box (or the given name search box) on the landing page leaving the other box empty and then click on search. This should return a list of everyone with that particular name. You could then browse the list for individuals that may be your ancestor.  
*Search the indexes of nearby counties.
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*Search the indexes of nearby localities.
  
=== General Information About These Records ===
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{{Tip|Don't overlook {{FHL|West Virginia, Naturalization and Citizenship|keywords|disp}} items in the FamilySearch Library Catalog. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see the wiki article [[West Virginia Archives and Libraries]]. For additional information about this state see the wiki article [[West Virginia Genealogy]].}}
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 +
=== General Information About These Records ===
  
 
Naturalization is the process of granting citizenship privileges and responsibilities to foreign-born residents. The counties recorded naturalization procedures in the court records as legal proof of citizenship. The courts handling naturalizations changed several times so the card index was created as a way to quickly access specific records.  
 
Naturalization is the process of granting citizenship privileges and responsibilities to foreign-born residents. The counties recorded naturalization procedures in the court records as legal proof of citizenship. The courts handling naturalizations changed several times so the card index was created as a way to quickly access specific records.  
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No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).&nbsp;  
 
No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).&nbsp;  
  
Naturalization records are generally well preserved, but some records may have been lost to fire or other disasters.
+
Naturalization records are generally well preserved, but some records may have been lost to fire or other disasters.  
  
 
== Known Issues with This Collection  ==
 
== Known Issues with This Collection  ==
  
{{HR Known Issues}}For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached [[West Virginia Naturalization Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)/Known Issues|Wiki article]]. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to [mailto:support@familysearch.org support@familysearch.org]. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.<br>
+
{{HR Known Issues}}For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached [[West Virginia Naturalization Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)/Known Issues|Wiki article]]. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to [mailto:support@familysearch.org support@familysearch.org]. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.  
  
 
== Related Websites  ==
 
== Related Websites  ==
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== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
  
*[[West Virginia Emigration and Immigration|West Virginia Emigration and Immigration]]  
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*[[West Virginia Emigration and Immigration]]  
*[[West Virginia Naturalization and Citizenship|West Virginia Naturalization and Citizenship]]
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*[[West Virginia Naturalization and Citizenship]]
  
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
 
== Contributions to This Article  ==
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{{Contributor_invite}}  
 
{{Contributor_invite}}  
  
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections ==
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== Citations for This Collection ==
 
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Citations for individual image records are available for this collection. Browse through images in this collection and click on the "Show Citation" box: [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https://familysearch.org/records/collection/1909003/waypoints West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991]
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When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.
+
  
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].  
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When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.  
  
=== Citation for This Collection ===
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'''Collection Citation''':<br> {{Collection citation | text= "West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991" Index and Images. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2015. Citing county clerks throughout West Virginia.}} <br><br>
  
The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.
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'''Record Citation''' (or citation for the index entry):<br> {{Record Citation Link
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|CID=CID1909003
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|title=West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991
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}}<br>
  
{{Collection citation | text= "West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991" Index and Images. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013.}}  
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'''Image citation''':<br> {{Image Citation Link
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|CID=CID1909003
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|title=West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991  
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}}  
  
 
[[Category:West_Virginia]]
 
[[Category:West_Virginia]]

Latest revision as of 19:25, 8 May 2015

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

The collection consists of a variety of naturalization records for 32 of 55 West Virginia counties. The records cover the years 1814 to 1991. Records include the following:

  • Declarations of intention
  • Petitions
  • Oaths of allegiance
  • Certificates of naturalization
  • Registers of naturalizations granted and/or denied
  • Card files of naturalization
  • Naturalization orders
  • Lists of naturalized citizens
  • Naturalization dockets

The following chart lists the counties included in the collection.

Barbour Hancock Mineral Randolph
Berkeley Hardy Mingo Roane
Brooke Harrison Monongalia Summers
Clay Lewis Nicholas Tucker
Fayette Logan Ohio Upshur
Gilmer Marion Pocahontas Wetzel
Greenbrier Mason Preston Wood
Hampshire McDowell Raleigh Wyoming
You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991.

Record Content

The following information is usually found in naturalization records:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Year of immigration
  • Native country
  • Birth place
  • Birth date

How to Use the Record

To begin your search it is helpful to know the following:

  • The full name of your ancestor
  • The approximate immigration and naturalization dates
  • The ancestor’s residence

If you do not know this information, check the 1900 census and then calculate the possible year of naturalization based on the date of immigration. The 1920 census may tell you the exact year of immigration or naturalization.

Search the Collection

To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person.

If you did not find the person you were looking for, you may need to search the collection by image.
⇒Select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page
⇒Select the "County" category
⇒Select the "Record Type, Date Range and Value" category which takes you to the images

Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.

With either search keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family.

For example, you can use naturalization records to:

  • Learn an immigrant’s place of origin
  • Confirm their date of arrival
  • Learn foreign and “Americanized” names
  • Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • Look for the Declaration of Intent soon after the immigrant arrived, and then look for the Naturalization Petition five years later, when the residency requirement would have been met. Look for naturalization records in federal courts and then in state, county, or city courts.
  • An individual may have filed the first and final papers in different courts and sometimes in a different state if the person moved. Immigrants who were younger than 18 when they arrived did not need to file a Declaration of Intent as part of the process.
  • If your ancestor had a common name, be sure to look at all the entries for a name before you decide which is correct.
  • Continue to search the naturalization records to identify siblings, parents, and other relatives in the same or other generations who may have naturalized in the same area or nearby.
  • The witnesses named on naturalization records may have been older relatives of the person in the naturalization process. Search for their naturalizations.
  • You may want to obtain the naturalization records of every person who shares your ancestor’s surname if they lived in the same county or nearby. You may not know how or if they are related, but the information could lead you to more information about your own ancestors.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.
  • Try alternative search methods such as only filling in the surname search box (or the given name search box) on the landing page leaving the other box empty and then click on search. This should return a list of everyone with that particular name. You could then browse the list for individuals that may be your ancestor.
  • Search the indexes of nearby localities.

General Information About These Records

Naturalization is the process of granting citizenship privileges and responsibilities to foreign-born residents. The counties recorded naturalization procedures in the court records as legal proof of citizenship. The courts handling naturalizations changed several times so the card index was created as a way to quickly access specific records.

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. 

The first naturalization act was passed in 1802. Immigrants to the United States were not required to apply for citizenship. Of those who did apply, many did not complete the requirements for citizenship. 

No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

Naturalization records are generally well preserved, but some records may have been lost to fire or other disasters.

Known Issues with This Collection

Important.png Problems with this collection?
See a list of known issues, workarounds, tips, restrictions, future fixes, news and other helpful information.

For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached Wiki article. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to support@familysearch.org. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.

Related Websites

West Virginia State Archives

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. We are looking for additional information that will help readers understand the topic and better use the available records. We also need translations for collection titles and images in articles about records written in languages other than English. For specific needs, please visit WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.


Citations for This Collection

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.

Collection Citation:

"West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991" Index and Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2015. Citing county clerks throughout West Virginia.

Record Citation (or citation for the index entry):

The citation for a record is available with each record in this collection, at the bottom of the record screen. You can search records in this collection by visiting the search page for West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991.

Image citation:

The citation for an image is available on each image in this collection by clicking Show Citation at the bottom left of the image screen. You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for West Virginia Naturalization Records, 1814-1991.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 8 May 2015, at 19:25.
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