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Uncle Doc's diary : the daily journal of Dr. Thomas Clayton McCarty, Spottsville, Henderson County, Kentucky, 1 January 1876--29 November 1915

additional material contributed by Janis Edwards Knox
Books/Monographs/Book with Film
English
Colorado Springs, Colorado : J.E. Knox, 1986
288, [50] p. : ill., facsims., ports.

Notes

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Includes obstetical records (chronological order), record of births (alphabetical order), and record of deaths (alphabetical order), and a general index of names mentioned in journal (alphabetical order).

Journal of Thomas Clayton McCarty (1830-1915?), who was born in Meade County, Kentucky to James Warder McCarty and Vizona Nevitt Lusk. His father and grandfather were both riverboat captains. His McCarty great-grandparents were from Fairfax County, Virginia, and his Lusk great-grandfather was an Irish immigrant to Virginia. Both his McCarty and his Lusk great-grandfathers served in the Revolutionary War. Thomas attended medical school at the University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, and probably also served an apprenticeship to a practicing doctor. He started his practice in November 1868 in the Spottsville, Kentucky area and married Sarah Frances (Fanny) Willingham in 1869. They had three surviving sons before she died at the age of 49; each of these three sons died before Dr. McCarty. The journal ia also a social history of the time.

The daily journal of Dr. McCarty was re-written at some point in time, and covers his medical practice in the area of Henderson County for people living in Spottsville, Baskett, Zion, Reed, and Hebbardsville. It also covers his medical practice on his visits to family and friends, chiefly in Daviesss, Meade, Hardin and Jefferson Counties in Kentucky, and New Albany, Indiana. "We discovered his obstetrics records in one of his office ledgers. I have indexed the births separately. I have also taken all the deaths in the journal and listed them in alphabetical order and have included additional data (in parentheses) taken from the Henderson Historical Society's books on Henderson County cemeteries." (Introduction). This record of births and deaths, as well as visits to patients (whose names are included and indexed), predates almost entirely any vital statistics for Kentucky for forty-five years.

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