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Choctaw Nation records

Manuscript/Manuscript on Film
  • English
  • Choctaw
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma : Oklahoma Historical Society, Indian Archives Division, 1971-
90 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.
Oklahoma Historical Society. Indian Archives Division; series CTN

Notes

Microfilm of originals at the Oklahoma Historical Society in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Text in English and Choctaw.

Includes census, Choctaw Indians, government records, correspondence, occupations, vital statistics, probate records, land and property, court records, military records, schools and other miscellaneous information.

The Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory maintained its own constitutional government and records for many years in the 19th century, and in limited form after 1906 and Oklahoma statehood. The Choctaw National Constitution was adopted on June 3, 1834 and the government consisted of a Principal Chief, a General Council, composed of a Senate and House of Representatives, and a court system consisting of a Supreme Court and district courts. The Nation was divided into three geographical and political districts. District One, Masholatubbee (Mushalatubbee), consisted of Tobucksy, Gaines, Sans Bois Skullyville and Sugar Loaf counties. District Two, Apuckshunnubbee (Apuckshunnubbi), consisted of Cedar, Nashoba, Towson, Boktuklo, Eagle, Wade and Red River counties. District Three, Pushmataha, consisted of Atoka, Jacks Fork, Blue, Jackson and Kiamichi counties. The district capitols were at Gaines, Alichi and Mayhew. The national capitol has been at Tuchkahomma (Tushka-Homma) for most of the years of the nation's existence.

In 1893, Congress provided for the creation of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes (Dawes Commission), and authorized this body to meet with representatives of the tribes, including the Choctaws. This effort met with resistance and rejection. It was not until April 23, 1897, under the Atoka agreement that the Choctaw finally consented to the provisions of allotment of their lands in severalty. Then in 1898, the Curtis Act, into which the Atoka agreement was incorporated, was made federal law. It provided that a census of each of the five tribes, the Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, and Chickasaw, should be taken to determine those individuals who were citizens of each tribe. It was necessary to acquire many of the national records of the tribes involved in order to carry out the responsibilities of the Commission. These records were taken from the various national repositories to Muskogee where the main Commission office was located. The Curtis Act also provided that the five governments be abolished on March 6, 1906 prior to Oklahoma statehood. However, at this time the work of the Commission was not completed, and an Act of Congress, April 26, 1906, provided for the continuance of the tribal government with limited autonomy.

For further information see beginning of film no. 1666451.

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