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Creek Nation

Manuscript/Manuscript on Film
English
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma : Oklahoma Historical Society, Indian Archives Division, 1971-
51 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.
Oklahoma Historical Society. Indian Archives Division; series CRN

Notes

Microfilm of originals at the Oklahoma Historical Society in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Includes census, correspondence, Creek Indians, Shawnee Indians, court records, government records, military records, land and property, vital statistics, schools, and other miscellaneous records.

The Creek Nation in Indian Territory maintained its own constitutional government and records for many years until the dissolution of the nation in 1906. The nation was composed of the Upper and Lower Creek divisions which were not fully united until 1867 when the "Muskogee Nation" was established with a written constitution and code of laws which remained in force until 1906. ... The judicial system included a Supreme Court and courts for each of the nation's six districts. The districts were Coweta, Muskogee (originally called Arkansas District), Eufaula, Wewoka, Deep Fork and Okmulgee.

The Creek volumes, many of which have been rebound, sometimes have several different titles: a spine title, a front cover title, and an inside page title. There may also be an Indian Archives title. These titles are not always the same. The Archives numbered title is given first in identification, then an original title, or titles, if given. In some cases one title will be given if there is agreement between all titles on, in or assigned to the volume. Creek volumes often contain a variety of different entries. These will be briefly outlined on a contents page for each volume filmed.

The national records of the Creek Nation are considered to be valuable because they represent, along with the tribal records of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole Nations, the largest group of records of sovereign Indian nations known to exist to this date. As such, they give a view of Indian history that is unkown and unavailable for other American Indian tribes who did not have constitutional governments and written records.

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