Arkansas, Second Registration Draft Cards (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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This article describes a collection of records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.
United States
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Flag of the United States of America
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Seal of the National Archives
Record Description
Record Type Military
Collection years 1948-1959
FamilySearch Resources
Related Websites
Archive
National Archives and Records Administration



What is in the Collection?

The collection consists of 4x6 cards (form SSS-1), which are arranged numerically by local board number, then alphabetically by surname of registrant. The cards cover the years 1948-1959 but they list individuals born between 1922 and 1940.

The collection was located at the National Archives and Records Administration Southwest region in Fort Worth Texas. They are now located at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. For additional information about this collection contact the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. The cards are part of Record Group 147: Records of the Selective Service System, 1926-1975.

To Browse This Collection

You will be able to browse through images in this collection when it is published.

Collection Content

Sample Image

After the United States entered World War II, a new Selective Service Act required that all men between the ages of 18 and 64 register for the draft. The local draft board of the Selective Service System conducted the registration. The original registration cards were later sent to the regional branch of the National Archives responsible for receiving records from that state

The purpose of this registration was to collect information on the industrial capacity and skills of men who were born between 1922 and 1940. This draft registration was intended to provide a complete inventory of manpower resources in the United States that could be utilized for national service.

Information on the cards was supplied by the individual but recorded by a registrar. While there was a chance of a recording error, each individual signed his card to attest that the information was correct.

What Can these Records Tell Me?

Registration cards usually include:

  • Name
  • Birth date
  • Birthplace (lists town or county and state or country
  • Residence
  • Mailing address
  • Name and address of the person who will always know the registrant’s address
  • Occupation
  • Employer’s name and address
  • Marital status
  • Physical description
  • Race

How Do I Search the Collection?

To begin your search it is helpful to know:

  • The name of your ancestor
  • The birth date and birth place of your ancestor
  • The state and county where your ancestor resided

Fill in the requested information in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information in the list to what you already know about your ancestor to determine if it is the correct person. You may need to compare several persons in the list before you find your ancestor.

Search by Name by visiting the Collection Page:

View images in this collection by visiting the Browse Page then select the appropriate "Local Board Number and Surname".


For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article [FamilySearch Tips and Tricks].

What Do I Do Next?

Whenever possible, view the original records to verify the information and to find additional information that might not be reported. These pieces of information can lead you to additional records and family members.

I Found Who I was Looking for, What Now?

  • Use the information to find other records such as birth, christening, marriage, census, land and probate records.
  • Use the information to find additional family members.
  • Repeat this process with additional family members found, to find more generations of the family.
  • Church Records often were kept years before government records were required and are a good source for finding ancestors before 1900.

I Can’t Find Who I’m Looking for, What Now?

  • Try viewing the original record to see if there were errors in the transcription of the name, age, residence, etc. Remember that there may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • Collect entries for every person who has the same surname. This list can help you identify possible relations that can be verified by records.
  • If you cannot locate your ancestor in the locality in which you believe they lived, then try searching records of a nearby locality in an area search.
  • Standard spelling of names typically did not exist during the periods our ancestors lived in. Try variations of your ancestor’s name while searching the index or browsing through images.
  • Remember that sometimes individuals went by nicknames or alternated between using first and middle names. Try searching for these names as well.
  • Search the indexes and records of Arkansas, United States Genealogy.
  • Search in the Arkansas Archives and Libraries.


Citing this Collection

Citing your sources makes it easy for others to find and evaluate the records you used. When you copy information from a record, list where you found that information. Here you can find citations already created for the entire collection and for each individual record or image.

Collection Citation:

"Arkansas, Second Draft Registration Cards, compiled 1948-1959." Database with Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2017. Citing United States Selective Service System. National Archives and Records Administration, Fort Worth, Texas.

Record Citation (or citation for the index entry):

The citation for a record will be available with each record once the collection is published.


Image Citation:

The image citation will be available once the collection is published.

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Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.