California Superintendency of Indian Affairs

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United States Gotoarrow.png American Indian Research Gotoarrow.png Bureau of Indian Affairs Gotoarrow.png Superintendencies Gotoarrow.png California

History

The California Superintendency of Indian Affairs was established in 1852 . After the Superintendency was abolished in 1873, the agents reported directly to the Office of Indian Affairs in Washington, DC. Correspondence was still filed under "California" until the filing system was changed in 1881, however.

Records for Superintendencies exist in the National Archives and copies of many of them are also available in other research facilities.

Tribes

Tejon, Tule (Tularenos), Mono, Kern River, Wikchamni, Nomelaki, Kings River, Fresno, Kawia, Nuimok, Noi- sas, Wailaki, Yupu, Yuki, Klamath, Hupa, Saia, Mattloe, Pit River, Redwood (Whilkut), Wappo, Yokaia (Ukian), Kianamaras, Pomo, Salan Pomo (Potter), Concow (Konkau) and Mission Indians

Special Agents and Commissioners and Appointment Dates

John Ross Browne 1857, George Bailey 1858, Robert J. Stevens 1866, John G. Ames May 6, 1873, Charles Q. Wetmore (special commissioner) August 10, 1874, D.A. Dryden March 31, 1875, Justin Colburn July 12, 1877, Samuel S. Lawson July 1, 1878

Adams Johnston (Subagent) April 13, 1849, George Barbour September 30, 1850. Oliver M. Wozencraft September 28, 1850, Redick McKee September 30, 1850, Samuel Sheldon September 1, 1852, Benjamin Wilson September 1, 1852,

Superintendents, 1852-60

Edward F. Beale March 5, 1852, Thomas J. Henley May 31, 1854, James Y. McDuffie 9 Mar. 1859  [1]

Northern District

John A. Driehbelbis June 21, 1860, George M. Hanson April 9, 1861, Elijah Steele August 10, 1863 [2]

Southern District

James Y. McDuffie June 21, 1860, Augustus D. Rightmire December 20, 1860, John P. H. Wentworth April 16, 1861 [3]

Superintendents, 1864-73

Austin Wiley, Charles Maltby, Billington C. Whiting, Bvt. Maj. Gen. John B. McIntosh, Billington C. Whiting

Agencies

Agencies and subagencies were created as administrative offices of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its predecessors. Their purpose was (and is) to manage Indian affairs with the tribes, to enforce policies, and to assist in maintaining the peace. The names and location of these agencies may have changed, but their purpose remained basically the same. Many of the records of genealogical value (for the tribe and tribal members) were created by and maintained by the agencies.

Records

Letters received by the Office of Indian Affairs from the California Superintendency, 1849-1880, have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of their Microcopy Number M234. Copies are available at the National Archives and at the Family History Library and its family history centers on their microfilm roll numbers 1660762 thru 1660782.

References

  1. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. By Edward E. Hill. Clearwater Publishing Co., New York, NY ©1974. FHL Book 970.1 H551o
  2. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. By Edward E. Hill. Clearwater Publishing Co., New York, NY ©1974. FHL Book 970.1 H551o
  3. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. By Edward E. Hill. Clearwater Publishing Co., New York, NY ©1974. FHL Book 970.1 H551o

Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches. New York, New York: Clearwater Press, [1974].

Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington [District of Columbia]: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981.

Historical Sketches for Jurisdictional and Subject Headings Used for the Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880. National Archives Microcopy T1105.

Preliminary Inventory No. 163: Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Washington, DC: