Florida Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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Florida, Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1955 .
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This article describes a collection of records at FamilySearch.org.
Florida, United States
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Flag of Florida
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Location of Florida
Record Description
Record Type Pension Applications
Collection years 1885-1955
FamilySearch Resources
Related Websites



What is in the Collection?

This collection includes pension records from 1885 to 1955.

This database contains images of Confederate pension applications. These records were created at the state level therefore, there are some variations in the qualifications for receiving aid and the amounts of aid between the states. Applications were sent to the state where the veteran or his dependents lived at the time of application, which was often not the state in which the veteran had enlisted or served.

In 1885, Florida began granting pensions to Confederate veterans and, in 1889, they expanded to include veteran’s widows as well. In most states the pension system began with providing pensions to injured veterans and then later expanded to include veteran’s widows or other dependents. In addition to Florida, Confederate pensions were also granted in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Pension applications were created to provide a way for veterans or their widows to obtain financial assistance after serving in the military.

You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for Florida, Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1955.

Collection Content

Sample Images

What Can this Collection Tell Me?

The information found in applications submitted by the veteran or his widow may include the following:

  • Name
  • Date and place of birth
  • Unit dates and places of enlistment and discharge
  • Brief description of service
  • Wounds received
  • Sworn statements on proof of service by comrades
  • Place and length of residency in the state
  • Widow's full name
  • Date and place of marriage to the veteran
  • Date and place of the veteran's death

How Do I Search the Collection?

To begin your search is it helpful to know:

  • The name of the soldier.
  • The birth date of the soldier.
  • The name of the solider's widow.
  • The place where the soldier lived.
  • The military unit in which the soldier served.

Search by Name by visiting the Collection Page:
Fill in the requested information in the boxes on the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the individuals in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at the information on several individuals comparing the information about them to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names, or variations of their name, throughout their life.
  • If your ancestor used an alias or a nickname, be sure to check for those alternate names.
  • Even though these indexes are very accurate they may still contain inaccuracies, such as altered spellings, misinterpretations, and optical character recognition errors if the information was scanned.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks.


View images in this collection by visiting the Browse Page:
To search the collection you will need to follow this series of links:
⇒Select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page
⇒Select "Claim numbers range" which takes you to the images.

Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.

What Do I Do Next?

When you have located your ancestor’s pension application, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. The pieces of information in the record may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. This information will often lead you to other records. In addition to providing information about the veteran and his family, pension applications can also lead to more military records

I Found Who I was Looking for, What Now?

  • Death dates may lead to death certificates, mortuary, or burial records.
  • Use the age to calculate an approximate birth date.
  • Use the birth date or age along with the residence or place of birth of the deceased to locate census, church, and land records.
  • Compile the entries for every person who has the same surname as the deceased; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.
  • Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have been seeking the pension.
  • When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
  • When searching for an application keep in mind that in some cases the applications were filed under the name of the widow or other dependent who submitted the application.
  • Applications were sent in to and processed by the state where the veteran or family member lived at the time, which was not always the state in which the soldier had served.

I Can't Find Who I'm Looking for, What Now?

  • Look for variant spellings of the names. You should also look for nicknames and abbreviated names.
  • Search the indexes and records of nearby localities.

Citing this Collection

Citing your sources makes it easy for others to find and evaluate the records you used. When you copy information from a record, list where you found that information. Here you can find citations already created for the entire collection and for each individual record or image.

Collection Citation:

"Florida Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1955" Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2016. Citing Comptroller's Office. State Capitol Building, Tallahassee.

Image Citation

The image citation is available by clicking on the Information tab at the bottom left of the screen. You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for Florida, Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1955.

How Can I Contribute to the FamilySearch Wiki?

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