Georgia Archives

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Georgia Archives
Georgia-archives Repository.jpg

Contact Information

Website:  www.GeorgiaArchives.org

Address:
5800 Jonesboro Road
Morrow, GA 30260

Telephone:  678-364-3710
Fax:  678-364-3860

Hours and holidays:  Tuesday through Saturday 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

As of July 1, 2013, the Georgia Archives was transferred to the University System of Georgia, which helped ease budgetary concerns. [1]

Directions, maps, and public transportation: From anywhere in Metro Atlanta, take I-285 to exit 55, Jonesboro Road. From the east, turn left; from the west, turn right onto Jonesboro Road. Drive about 4 miles and the Archive will be on your left, just after Harper Drive. The Georgia Archive shares a parking lot with the National Archives at Atlanta branch and is the building on the right. 

Internet sites and databases:

Collection Description

The Georgia Archives holds state government records, and county records of Georgia. This is the place to start searching for early Georgia ancestors.[2] They also have genealogies, county histories, newspapers, tax digests, private papers, church records, cemeteries, Bible records, a few municipal records, census, maps, land plats, photographs, Georgia Confederate service and pension records, colonial, headright, and bounty land grants, and land lottery records.

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The Georgia Archives is overseen by the University System of Georgia. They are responsible for collecting and maintaining the historical records of Georgia government and history. [3]
  • County Records On Microfilm - One of the largest collections of interest, comprising records created by Georgia counties until 1900. An index of records is maintained on a card catalog. Records include Wills, Marriage Records, Land Records, Minute Books, etc.
  • Books - The archive holds thousands of books covering all 50 states and a variety of genealogical topics. 
  • Vertical Files - Miscellaneous records collected by the archive covering a variety of topics, including cemeteries, war, and specific surnames.
  • General Name Card Files - A card catalog of select individuals found in the records of the archive, mainly political or socially prominent individuals.

Georgia's Virtual Vault provides virtual access to historic Georgia manuscripts, photographs, maps, and government records housed in the state archives. It includes Colonial will books, Confederate pension applications, County maps, County tax digests, Georgia death certificates, headright and bounty plats, marriage records, Spanish-American War service summary cards and more.

Guides

Tips

Due to restricted hours, microfilm readers with computers and printers attached are in high demand. Users may have to wait or sign up in advance for the machines and will likely be limited to an hour's use at a time. Numerous older, hand crank machines are available, though less sought after. 

Alternate Repositories

If you cannot visit or find a record at the Georgia Archives, a similar record may be available at one of the following.

Overlapping Collections

  • National Archives I, Washington DC, census, pre-WWI military service & pensions, passenger lists, naturalizations, passports, federal bounty land, homesteads, bankruptcy, ethnic sources, prisons, and federal employees.[4]
  • National Archives at Atlanta federal censuses, Ancestry.com, military, pensions, bounty-land, photos, passengers lists, naturalizations, Native Americans, African Americans, and workshops.[5]
  • Federal Records Center, Ellenwood, GA., receives federal agency and court records of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Similar Collections

  • Family History Library, Salt Lake City, 450 computers, 3,400 databases, 3.1 million microforms, 4,500 periodicals, 310,000 books of worldwide family and local histories, civil, church, immigration, ethnic, military, Mormon records. Many Georgia Archives  microfilms are also available at branch FamilySearch Centers  in local LDS churches, and described in their online FamilySearch Catalog.[6]
  • Dallas Public Central Library 111,700 volumes, 64,500 microfilms, 89,000 microfiche, and over 700 maps, marriage, probate, deed, and tax abstracts in book form, or microfilm of originals for some states, and online databases including Georgia and other Southern states.[7]

Neighboring Collections

Sources

  1. http://www.usg.edu/news/release/state_archives_join_university_system
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 William Dollarhide, and Ronald A. Bremer, America's Best Genealogy Resource Centers (Bountiful, UT: Heritage Quest, 1988), 33. WorldCat 39493985; FHL Book 973 J54d. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "DB33" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "DB33" defined multiple times with different content
  3. Departments of Academic Affairs in University System of Georgia (accessed 11 January 2016), and About the Georgia Archives in University System of Georgia (accessed 11 January 2016).
  4. Dollarhide and Bremer, 2.
  5. Dollarhide and Bremer, 127-28.
  6. Dollarhide and Bremer, 1.
  7. Dollarhide and Bremer, 107.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Handybook for Genealogists (Logan, Utah : Everton Publishers Inc, 1999), 84. WorldCat 670125599; FHL Book 973 D27e 1999.
  9. Special Collections in Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System (accessed 8 January 2016).
  10. Kenan Research Center in Atlanta History Center (accessed 11 September 2015).
  11. Subject Guides in Athens Regional Library System (accessed 25 January 2016).
  12. Collections in DeKalb History Center (accessed 11 September 2015).
  13. Contact Us in Georgia Genealogical Society (accessed 8 January 2016).
  14. Living History Museum in Visit Ebenezer (accessed 11 September 2015).
  15. The Genealogical and Historical Room in Middle Georgia Regional Library (accessed 17 January 2016).
  16. Dollarhide and Bremer, 85.
  17. Collections in State Archives of North Carolina (accessed 7 February 2014).