Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe

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United States Gotoarrow.png New Mexico Gotoarrow.png Archives and Libraries Gotoarrow.png Archdiocese of Santa Fe

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe
File-Cathedral of St. Francis, Santa Fe, New Mexico.JPG

Contact Information

E-mail:[1]  Contact Us

Address:[1]

223 Cathedral Place
Santa Fe, NM 87505

Telephone:[1]  505.983.3811
Fax:  505.992.0341

Archives hours:  By appointment.[1]

Map, directions, and public transportation

  • Directions:[2]
    • From Southwest of Santa Fe on I-25 (Canam Hwy): Merge onto I-25 N/US-85 North toward Santa Fe. Take the US-84 N/US-285 N/St Francis Dr exit, EXIT 282B-A, toward Santa Fe-Plaza, 0.3 mi. Merge onto S Saint Francis Dr/US-84 N/US-285 N via the ramp on the left toward Santa Fe Plaza/LOS ALAMOS/Taos, 3.4 mi. Turn right onto Cerrillos Rd/NM-14. Continue to follow NM-14, 0.9 mi. NM-14 becomes Galisteo St, 0.08 mi. Turn right onto W Alameda St, 0.3 mi. Turn left onto Cathedral Pl, 0.09 mi. The Museum and ARCHIVES of the Archdiocese at 223 CATHEDRAL PL is on the right.
    • from North of Santa Fe on US-84 S/US-285 (Taos Hwy): Turn onto US-84 S/US-285 (Taos Hwy) South toward Santa Fe. Take the exit on the left toward Downtown Plaza, 0.3 mi. Stay straight to go onto N Guadalupe St, 0.8 mi. Turn left onto W San Francisco St, 0.4 mi. Turn right onto Cathedral Pl, 0.07 mi. The Museum and ARCHIVES of the Archdiocese at 223 CATHEDRAL PL is on the left.
    • from East of Santa Fe on I-25 (Canam Hwy): Merge onto I-25 S/US-85 S/US-84 North toward Santa Fe. Take the NM-466/Old Pecos Tr exit, EXIT 284, 0.2 mi. Turn slight right onto NM-466/Old Pecos Trl, 1.3 mi. Turn slight right onto Old Pecos Trl, 1.6 mi. Turn slight left onto Old Santa Fe Trl, 0.3 mi. Turn right onto Paseo de Peralta, 0.4 mi. Turn left onto E Alameda St, 0.09 mi. Take the 1st right onto Cathedral Pl, 0.09 mi. The Museum and ARCHIVES of the Archdiocese at 223 CATHEDRAL PL is on the right.
  • Public transportation Santa Fe Trails city bus Route M Museum Hill stops on E Alameda St near Cathedral Pl about half a block south of the Museum and ARCHIVES.

Internet sites and databases:

Collection Description

Created in 1850 from part of the Archdiocese of Durango (Mexico), the Archdiocese of Santa Fe once included Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico, but has been sub-divided and is now limited to only part of northern New Mexico.[4]

The Santa Fe Archives of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe contain historical religious documents about the people of New Mexico, leaders, parishes, and the Archdiocese, and some older records for Arizona and Colorado. This includes microfilmed records of dozens of parishes from three states between 1678 and 1950. Copies of these microfilms are also accessible at the Family History Library and at Family History Centers. No recent parish registers from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe are available for genealogical research.

The Archdiocese offices on the West Mesa in Albuquerque are also home to the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center (HGRC) of New Mexico. This includes the Great New Mexico Pedigree Database (GNMPD), an Internet database for Hispanic ancestors of New Mexico and their descendants.[3]

Jurisdiction and Chair

Presently the Archdiocese of Santa Fe covers an area of 61,142 square miles. There are 91 parish seats and 216 active missions throughout this area.[4]

The liturgical center and "cathedra" or chair of the Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe to this day remain in Santa Fe. Administrative offices of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, however, were relocated to Albuquerque by Archbishop James Peter Davis, ninth Archbishop of Santa Fe, in 1967. The administration of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe is now conducted from offices located at the Catholic Center on the West Mesa in Albuquerque.[4]

History

Pope Pius IX created the Vicariate Apostolic of New Mexico on July 19, 1850. Its first Bishop was Father Jean Baptiste Lamy who arrived in New Mexico in the summer of 1851. Within two years the Vicariate Apostolic had become a See in its own right, the Diocese of Santa Fe. On February 12, 1875, the Diocese of Santa Fe was elevated to an Archdiocese with Bishop Lamy as its first Archbishop. After the death of Archbishop Lamy (February 14, 1888), John Baptist Salpointe became the Archbishop. [4]

The territory covered by the Archdiocese of Santa Fe was so immense,that in time it began dividing itself into other entities. Arizona and Colorado Vicerates were created and later became dioceses. The southernmost part of New Mexico is now the Diocese of Las Cruces which was created on October 18, 1982. The north western and west central portion of New Mexico became part of the Diocese of Gallup when it was created on December 16, 1939.[4]

Tip

Appointments are required for any type of personal or professional research or use of archive materials; this includes all types of research and/or use of material including use of the library, research for genealogical, or family history, or church history.[1]

Alternate Repositories

If you cannot visit or find a source at the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe, a similar source may be available at one of the following.

Overlapping Collections

  • National Archives I, Washington DC, census, pre-WWI military service & pensions, passenger lists, naturalizations, passports, federal bounty land, homesteads, bankruptcy, ethnic sources, prisons, and federal employees.
  • New Mexico State Records Center and Archives, Santa Fe, Roman Catholic church records, censuses, district court, land grants, wills, diaries, family papers, prisons, family and local histories, newspapers. NM's best genealogy repository because of its original territorial, state, and county records.[5]
  • New Mexico State Library, Santa Fe, history, biography, ethnic studies, newspapers, government documents, maps, periodicals, and genealogies. Largest book collection in New Mexico.[5]
  • New Mexico Genealogical Society, Albuquerque, manuscripts, newspapers, periodicals, histories, directories, maps, photos.
  • Historical Society of New Mexico, Santa Fe, increasing knowledge and preserving New Mexico history through conferences, publications, plaques, a speakers bureau, and Internet links.[6]

Similar Collections

Neighboring Collections

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Office of Historic-Artistic Patrimony and Archives in Archdiocese of Santa Fe (accessed 3 February 2015).
  2. Based on MapQuest directions.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 HGRC Home in Hispanic Genealogical Research Center (accessed 21 January 2015).
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 About the Archdiocese of Santa Fe in Archdiocese of Santa Fe (accessed 20 January 2015).
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 William Dollarhide and Ronald A. Bremer. America's Best Genealogy Resource Centers (Bountiful, Utah: Heritage Quest, 1998), 79. At various libraries (WorldCat). FHL Ref Book 973 J54d.
  6. Home in Historical Society of New Mexico (accessed 31 January 2015).
  7. CSWR Collection Strengths in University of New Mexico University Libraries (accessed 17 Jan 2015).
  8. Archives in National Hispanic Cultural Center (accessed 20 January 2015).
  9. Research Library in National Hispanic Cultural Center (accessed 20 January 2015).
  10. Overview - Special Collections in Albuquerque Bernalillo County Library (accessed 20 January 2014).