Rothesay Nonconformist church Records

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Rothesay Pre-1855 Nonconformist Churches and Their Records

Rothesay United (Secession) Presbyterian Church

History—
Ten persons resident in the island of Bute petitioned the General Associate Presbytery of Glasgow for supply of sermon in December 1764. The Presbytery did not then comply with the request as they had no preachers who could speak the Gaelic language, which was regarded as necessary for a missionary to the west Highlands. In 1779, twelve persons resident in the parishes of Rothesay, Kingarth, Inverchaolin, and Dunoon petitioned the Presbytery with the same request and a minister was sent to supply the station. The station at Rothesay prospered and it was organized as a congregation. The first church was built in 1783.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
The extent of any records is unknown.


Rothesay Free Church

History—
The minister of the parish, most of the elders, and 554 members of the congregation "came out" in 1843. The Gaelic church was found to be too small for them so they worshiped for a time in the yard of a cooperage, roofed for the purpose. The new church was opened in July 1845. A school was built which was maintained for many years. The congregation bought the Old Reformed Presbyterian church, and made it the centre of mission work. The population changed in character with the closing of the cotton mills, and the development of Rothesay as a summer resort.
Membership: 1848, 554; 1900 458.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records: Years FHL Film Number Printout on Fiche
Baptisms 1841-1849   0889485 item 5  6901818
Marriages 1842-1843 0889485 item 5  6901819

Other:
Accounts 1843-1876
Deacons Court Minutes 1843-1904
Communion Roll 1843, 1846-1899
Members and Adherents 1851-1852
Births and Baptisms 1849-1886
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/486.


Gaelic, Chapelhall Free Church

History—
The minister and the whole congregation of the Gaelic church in Rothesay adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to worship in their church, until deprived of it in 1858. A new church was opened in 1860.
Membership: 1870, 138; 1900 235.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
There are no known pre-1855 records.


Rothesay West Free Church

History—
The minister of this chapel of ease to Rothesay Parish Church, and almost all the congregation, "came out" in 1843. The new church was erected in Argyle Street in 1846.
Membership: 1848, 578; 1900, 388.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Cash Book 1849-1868
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/970.


Rothesay Reformed Presbyterian Church

History—
In the Presbytery minutes, Rothesay appears in 1827 for the first time as one of the stations to which preaching was assigned. At the end of that year a petition, subscribed by eight persons, asked for regular monthly supply of sermon, and the request was granted. A minister was ordained in 1830 and continued there until 1868. The question of continuance was then raised but a new minister was ordained in June 1870 and served until 1875. During its whole history the congregation continued small, the average membership being considerably under 100. Finally, in November 1875 the congregation was dissolved. The majority of all Reformed Presbyterian churches in Scotland united with the Free Church in 1876.
Membership: 1870, 62.
Source: The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland, by W. J. Couper, pub. 1925. FHL book 941 K2c. More details are given in the source.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.


Rothesay Congregational (Independent) Church

History—
A small church was formed in 1836 as the result of evangelistic labors in the Gaelic language. In the same year a small chapel was opened at Ardbeg. The church ceased in 1848.
Membership: 1837, 28.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. FHL book 941 K2es. More details are given in the source.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX
Scotland


Scottish Episcopalian Church, Millport

History—
Unavailable
Note: The church of St. Andrew’s, Millport was built in 1849–1851, but a chapel existed prior to that date. Another church, called St. Paul’s was built later at Rothesay.
Membership: 1837, 35.

Records—
Baptisms 1854
Marriages 1853-1854
Note: Records are apparently in local custody. For information write to:
Argyll and the Isles Diocesan Offices
The Pines
Ardconnel Road
Oban, Arbyll PA34 5DR
Scotland


Rothesay Catholic Church

History—
The area was served from Campbeltown since before 1829. It was called Kames Bay, and became part of the Western District in 1829. The mission was known as Rothesay. The church was dedicated in 1849, called St. Mary's, Stella Maris. It was rededicated as St. Andrew's, Rothesay in 1866.
Membership: 1837, 53.
Source: Catholic Missions and Registers 1700–1880, Scotland, by Michael Gandy, pub. 1993 FHL book 942 K24gm vol. 6

Records—
Baptisms 1849-1880
Marriages 1850-1880
Note: Available online for a fee, at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, Edinburgh, record RH21/49.


Note: According to the New Statistical Account of Scotland for Rothesay for 1840, quoting a religious census of 1837, there were also fourteen members of the Relief Church, two Methodists, and six Old Light Burghers who had no places of worship within the parish.


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