Switzerland, Schaffhausen, Directories, Emigration, and Genealogies (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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Switzerland, Schaffhausen, Directories, Emigration, and Genealogies, 1460-1952 .
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This article describes a collection of records at FamilySearch.org.
Schaffhausen, Switzerland
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Location of Schaffhausen, Switzerland
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Record Description
Record Type: Directories, Emigration, Genealogies
Collection years: 1460-1952
Languages: German
Title in the Languages: Schweiz, Schaffhausen Stammbäume und Stadtadreßbücher, 1460-1952
FamilySearch Resources
Related Websites
Archive
Schaffhausen Stadarchiv


What is in the Collection?

This Collection will include records from 1460 to 1952.

Some bleed-through of the ink may be found on pages of this collection, which may make reading the records difficult.

This collection includes city directories (various directories from 1865 to 1952) and compiled genealogies for the Schaffhausen area. The three compiled genealogies are especially valuable; they compile vital information (names, dates, and places) for Schaffhausen families and arrange this data by surname. Persons seeking information about a particular ancestor can look up the ancestor by surname and will likely add multiple generations to their pedigree.

The genealogies in this collection cover material starting as early as 1460 and go through about 1900. The city directories vary in the years covered (1865-1952); most are for the late 1800s and early 1900s.

City directories were created to enumerate the households in the Schaffhausen area. The genealogies were compiled from the available vital records to collect information about Schaffhausen families.

City directories are fairly reliable sources for a person’s address. Other information found in the entries (for example, the wife’s surname or the occupation of the householder) is only as reliable as the person who provided the information. Compiled genealogies include information usually extracted from original records; however, sometimes the data is from personal memory. In any case, the data is only as reliable as the original source (records or memory) and should be corroborated with other available records.

For a list of records by event and date currently published in this collection, select the Browse link from the collection landing page.

Sample Images

Click on images for a larger view.

City directory records may contain the following information:

  • Householder’s surname and given name
  • Householder’s street and number
  • Householder’s occupation
  • In later records, the maiden name of householder’s wife

Genealogical records may contain the following information:

  • Husband’s name and vital information (birth, marriage, and death)
  • Wife’s maiden name and vital information (birth and death)
  • Children’s names with vital information, sometimes including “see also” references to other pages in the genealogies
  • Sometimes data for several generations of people


How Do I Search the Collection?

You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for Switzerland, Schaffhausen, Directories, Emigration, and Genealogies.

To search by image:

⇒Select the "Browse" link in the initial search page
⇒Select the "Record Type" category
⇒Select the "Record Description" category which takes you to the images.

Search the collection by image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine which one is your ancestor. You may need to compare the information about more than one person to make this determination.

City directories are arranged by year and then within the year, separated alphabetically by the first letter of the surname. Earlier city directories are in Gothic typeface; later directories are in Roman typeface. To use a city directory, search for the surname of your ancestor in the main directory and in the business section (he might have owned a business in the area).

Genealogies are arranged by genealogy type (Bartenschlager Harder, Bartenschlager, or Bartenschlager-Bäschlin), then by the first letter of the surname, and finally alphabetically by surname. The beginning of each volume usually has a register, or inhalt, which is a list of the names covered. Page through to find the surname you want. There is usually a title page for the surname with the family crest before the data begins. The data is divided on a page by families; the father or husband appears first with his vital information, followed by the wife and her vital information, then the enumerated children. Sometimes you will find “see also” references that direct you to more information about the person. For example, “v. S. 34” means “see page 34,” and “vid. Pag. 59” means “see page 59.”

These genealogies are handwritten using the old German script and may at times be difficult to read. Abbreviations and symbols are also used heavily throughout the genealogies. The language used is Swiss German (for example: Junÿ equals Juni or June and Julÿ equals Juli or July).

I Found Who I was Looking for, What Now?

  • Use the age in the citizen to find an approximate birth year to begin your search in church or civil records.
  • Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have moved, been recruited or lived nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify. Compile the entries for every person who has the same surname; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual. This compiled list can help you identify possible relations that can be further verified by researching vital records indexes in the country.
  • When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. Save a copy of the image or transcribe the information. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details such as a title, an occupation, or land ownership. Add this new information to your records of each family. You should also look for leads to other records about your ancestors.
  • Church Records often were kept years before government records were required and are a good source for finding ancestors before 1900.

I Can't Find Who I'm Looking for, What Now?

  • Switch to a different record collection. Depending on the time period, either Civil Registration records or Church Records may be more useful.
  • While searching, it is helpful to know such information as the ancestor’s given name and surname, some identifying information such as residence and age, and family relationships. Remember that there may be more than one person in the records with the same name as an ancestor and that the ancestor may have used nicknames or different names at different times.
  • Keep in mind that there may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • Standard spelling of names typically did not exist during the periods our ancestors lived in. Try variations of your ancestor’s name while searching the index or browsing through images. Pay special attention to how the name should have been pronounced and try variations on the pronunciation.
  • Remember that sometimes individuals went by nicknames or alternated between using first and middle names. Try searching for these names as well.
  • Search the indexes and records of local genealogical societies.
  • Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1800.
  • There is also some variation in the information given from one record to another.

Known Issues with This Collection

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See a list of known issues, workarounds, tips, restrictions, future fixes, news and other helpful information.

For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached article. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to support@familysearch.org. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.

Citing this Collection

Citing your sources makes it easy for others to find and evaluate the records you used. When you copy information from a record, list where you found that information. Here you can find citations already created for the entire collection and for each individual record or image.  

Collection Citation:

"Switzerland, Schaffhausen, Directories, Emigration, and Genealogies, 1460-1952." Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2016. Schaffhausen Stadtarchiv, Shaffhausen (Schaffhausen City Archives).

Image Citation:

The image citation is available by clicking on the Information tab at the bottom left of the screen. You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for Switzerland, Schaffhausen, Directories, Emigration, and Genealogies, 1460-1952.

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