Chadkirk, Cheshire Genealogy

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England Gotoarrow.png Cheshire Gotoarrow.png Cheshire ParishesGotoarrow.png Chadkirk
Romiley - Chadkirk Chapel.JPG

Chapelry History

Chadkirk St Chad is a chapelry in Cheshire and was created in 1745 from part of Romiley chapelry in Stockprt St Mary Ancient parish. 

The chapel originated in the 16th Century, although the site may date back even further - to the arrival of St Chad in the 7th Century. The name 'Chadkirk' means the 'Church of Chad' and may be the 'Cedde' mentioned in the Doomsday Book of 1086.

There is a legend which says that a hart (deer) disturbed St. Chad while he was alone in his cell by the spring and, after drinking and departing, it was followed by Wulfhade son of King Wulfhere of Mercia in hot pursuit. Wulfhade asked St. Chad if he had seen the hart and Chad replied that it had been sent that way by God to lead Wulfhade to him to hear the Christian message. Wulfhade replied that he would be more likely to convert from Paganism if Chad's prayers could bring the hart back.

Chad duly prayed and the hart ran out of the forest and stood before Wulfhade who fell at Chad's feet, converted and asked for baptism. Later Wulfhade brought his brother Rufine to Chad for baptism but their father the King had renounced Christianity at this time and slew them both in anger. In remorse King Wulfhere himself later sought out Chad who he found in his cell which was filled with heavenly light. Seeing the King there St. Chad rose hurriedly taking off his vestments and hanging them carelessly on a sunbeam which miraculously held them up (a miracle also attributed to the Celtic St. Bridget). Seeing the King's remorse St. Chad told him to destroy the heathen shrines and build monasteries which the King apparently did.

The well and spring exist to this day. Most of what we know about St. Chad has been written by Bede in his 'A History Of The English Church And People' written in Northumbria in 731 AD and, despite being of Roman persuasion, Bede had a very high regard for St. Chad.

Chad was born in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria to Ceawlin and educated from about the age of twelve with his three brothers, Cedd, Cynebil and Caelin, at the monastery of Lindisfarne under St. Aidan. All four eventually graduated as priests in the Celtic Church, St. Chad in Ireland in 653 AD at the age of thirty. It was St. Chad who helped convert King Penda of Mercia after Penda had killed his Christian rival King Oswald at Winwick near Warrington.

St. Chad became famous for his diplomatic nature and always travelled on foot, giving a horse given to him by King Oswin of Northumbria to a beggar - until Archbishop Theodore insisted on him riding a horse. He also acted as interpreter between Celtic and Roman Saxon church leaders at the 'Council Of Whitby' convened by King Oswy of Northumbria in 664 AD to decide which form of Christianity would continue as the basis for the church. Here Roman Christianity, championed by St. Wilfrid, won the day.  

Werneth, St. Paul parish was created to serve part of Romiley from 1877.

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Registration Districts

Stockport (1837–1937).

Church records

Chadkirk (Romiley) Chapelry registers of christenings, marriages and burials have been indexed by the following groups:

FS PR's =FamilySearch Parish Registers
FS BT's = FamilySearch Bishops Transcripts
Chadkirk (Romiley) Chapelry Online Records

Baptisms
Marriages
Burials

Indexes Images Indexes Images Indexes Images
FS PR's 1790-1895
  NONE
   NONE
  NONE
1755-1913
  NONE
FS BT'S 1790-1909   NONE
   NONE
  NONE
1802-1913
  NONE

To find the names of the neighbouring parishes, use England Jurisdictions 1851. In this site, search for the name of the parish, click on the location "pin", click Options and click List contiguous parishes.

Parish registers for the chapelry of Chadkirk, 1747-1910 Chadkirk, also known as Romiley, is a chapelry in Stockport parish.  Cheshire Record Office call number: P90/1/1-2, 2/1-2, 3337/1, 3/1.

An index for Cheshire parish registers is available online in Record Search. Here is a list of church records on microfilm at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

Parish Register Content FHL Film
Burials, 1747-1813, 1847-1868. Marriages, 1747-1754. Baptisms, 1747-1910. BRITISH
2147234 Items 1 - 6


Bishop's transcripts for Chadkirk, 1790-1913 St. Chad's Church is a chapelry known as Chadkirk. The civil chapelry is called Romiley not Chadkirk.Cheshire Record Office: EDB 47

An index for Cheshire, Church of England, Bishop’s transcripts is available online in Record Search

Bishop's Transcript Content FHL Film
Baptisms, burials, 1790-1913. BRITISH 1647367 Item 4
Non-Conformist Churches
  •  Romiley, Methodist Chapel (Primitive).
  •  Romiley, Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan).

For history of Methodist worship in Romiley http://www.romileymethodists.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7&Itemid=3

Non-Conformist Records:

Methodist records are held at Manchester Central Libray. Romiley Methodist Circuit (C19)

Census records

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library. The first film number is 241244.


Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Cheshire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Poor Law Unions

  • Stockport

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

Bibliography