Difference between revisions of "Cousin"

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A "cousin" has to be one of the most misunderstood or confusing terms especially when talking about which cousin and how many times removed. Below is a table showing the relationship of various cousins.
  
<br> A "cousin" has to be one of the most misunderstood or confusing terms especially when talking about which cousin and how many times removed. Below is a table showing the relationship of various cousins.  
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An example of the use of this table would be to find myself ("self"), go diagonally up to my great-great-grandparents, and straight down to their child, grandchild, &amp; then great-grandchild. This person is my 2nd cousin, once removed.  
  
An example of the use of this table would be to find myself ("self"), go diagonally up to my great-great-grandparents, and straight down to their child, grandchild, & then great-grandchild. This person is my 2nd cousin, once removed.
 
 
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To figure out the relationship of a cousin without the table, you need to count the number of generations to the common ancestor for both yourself and the individual in question.
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To figure out the relationship of a cousin without the table, you need to count the number of generations to the common ancestor for both yourself and the individual in question.  
  
Looking at the two numbers:
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Looking at the two numbers:  
*If one of the numbers is zero, then the relationship is one of a direct line relative.
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*If one of the numbers is one, then the relationship is one of a sibling or niece/nephew (or aunt/uncle depending which way you are looking at it), etc.
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*If one of the numbers is zero, then the relationship is one of a direct line relative.  
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*If one of the numbers is one, then the relationship is one of a sibling or niece/nephew (or aunt/uncle depending which way you are looking at it), etc.  
 
*Otherwise, the smaller of the two numbers will give you the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. cousin after subtracting one.
 
*Otherwise, the smaller of the two numbers will give you the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. cousin after subtracting one.
  
For example, if I count four generations between myself and the common ancestor AND three generations between the other relative and the same common ancestor, I take the smaller of the two numbers and subtract one giving two, so they are a second cousin with some number removed.
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For example, if I count four generations between myself and the common ancestor AND three generations between the other relative and the same common ancestor, I take the smaller of the two numbers and subtract one giving two, so they are a second cousin with some number removed.  
  
 
To figure how much removed, I take the larger of the two numbers (3) and subtract the smaller of the two numbers (2) giving 1, so they are once removed.
 
To figure how much removed, I take the larger of the two numbers (3) and subtract the smaller of the two numbers (2) giving 1, so they are once removed.

Revision as of 22:21, 31 August 2011

Familytree.jpg

A "cousin" has to be one of the most misunderstood or confusing terms especially when talking about which cousin and how many times removed. Below is a table showing the relationship of various cousins.

An example of the use of this table would be to find myself ("self"), go diagonally up to my great-great-grandparents, and straight down to their child, grandchild, & then great-grandchild. This person is my 2nd cousin, once removed.

Great-Great-Grandparents
Great Grandparents Great-Grand Uncles/Aunts
Grandparents Grand Uncles/Aunts 1st Cousin Twice Removed
Parents Aunts/Uncles 1st Cousins Once Removed 2nd Cousins Once Removed
Self Brothers/Sisters 1st Cousins 2nd Cousins 3rd Cousins
Children Nephews/Nieces 1st Cousins Once Removed 2nd Cousins Once Removed 3rd Cousins Once Removed
Grand Children Grand Nephews/Nieces 1st Cousins Twice Removed 2nd Cousins Twice Removed 3rd Cousins Twice Removed
Great-Grand Children Great-Grand Nephews/Nieces 1st Cousins Thrice Removed 2nd Cousins Thrice Removed 3rd Cousins Thrice Removed
2nd Great-Grand Children 2nd Great-Grand Nephews/Nieces 1st Cousins 4x Removed 2nd Cousins 4x Removed 3rd Cousins 4x Removed

To figure out the relationship of a cousin without the table, you need to count the number of generations to the common ancestor for both yourself and the individual in question.

Looking at the two numbers:

  • If one of the numbers is zero, then the relationship is one of a direct line relative.
  • If one of the numbers is one, then the relationship is one of a sibling or niece/nephew (or aunt/uncle depending which way you are looking at it), etc.
  • Otherwise, the smaller of the two numbers will give you the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. cousin after subtracting one.

For example, if I count four generations between myself and the common ancestor AND three generations between the other relative and the same common ancestor, I take the smaller of the two numbers and subtract one giving two, so they are a second cousin with some number removed.

To figure how much removed, I take the larger of the two numbers (3) and subtract the smaller of the two numbers (2) giving 1, so they are once removed.