Difference between revisions of "Kansas Cemeteries"

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The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) collection contains tombstone inscriptions from Kansas cemeteries. This collection is described in [[Kansas Genealogy]]. Inscriptions from headstones in hundreds of small graveyards in every county of the state are recorded in Don L. Ford, ''Abandoned and Semi-Active Cemeteries of Kansas'', 3 vols. (Decorah, Iowa: Anundsen Publishing, 1983-85; Family History Library book 978.1 V3f.)  
 
The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) collection contains tombstone inscriptions from Kansas cemeteries. This collection is described in [[Kansas Genealogy]]. Inscriptions from headstones in hundreds of small graveyards in every county of the state are recorded in Don L. Ford, ''Abandoned and Semi-Active Cemeteries of Kansas'', 3 vols. (Decorah, Iowa: Anundsen Publishing, 1983-85; Family History Library book 978.1 V3f.)  
  
*Another collection of tombstone inscriptions is ''Cemetery Records of Kansas'', 18 vols. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society, 1956-64; Family History Library book [http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=590138&disp=Cemetery+records+of+Kansas%2C+combined+t%20%20&columns=*,0,0 978.1 V22]; films 873686-90; fiche 6051176.) The index is in Family History Library book 978.1 V22 index; film 1320674 item 42).&nbsp;&nbsp;  
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*Another collection of tombstone inscriptions is ''Cemetery Records of Kansas'', 18 vols. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society, 1956-64; Family History Library book {{FHL|590138|title-id|disp=978.1 V22}}; films 873686-90; fiche 6051176.) The index is in Family History Library book 978.1 V22 index; film 1320674 item 42).&nbsp;&nbsp;  
 
*The [http://rootsweb.com/~ksrcgs Reno County, Kansas, Genealogical Society] Web page&nbsp;site has&nbsp;interment lists for all fifty four county cemeteries.&nbsp;  
 
*The [http://rootsweb.com/~ksrcgs Reno County, Kansas, Genealogical Society] Web page&nbsp;site has&nbsp;interment lists for all fifty four county cemeteries.&nbsp;  
 
*&nbsp;The [http://www.kshs.org/genealogists/vital/topekastatehospitalcemetery.htm Topeka State Hospital], a publicly funded institution for the care and treatment of the mentally ill in Topeka, Kansas, was in operation from 1872 to 1997. For some, the grounds of the hospital became their final resting place. There is a searchable index to the 1157 individuals buried in the hospital cemetery. With only a few exceptions, individuals were buried without a headstone.<br>Because most individuals were buried in unmarked graves, hospital officials used a grid pattern and designated gravesites by their distance from stone markers placed at the end of each row. The 'Location' is the distance in feet and inches from the eastern marker west to the gravesite. <br><br>
 
*&nbsp;The [http://www.kshs.org/genealogists/vital/topekastatehospitalcemetery.htm Topeka State Hospital], a publicly funded institution for the care and treatment of the mentally ill in Topeka, Kansas, was in operation from 1872 to 1997. For some, the grounds of the hospital became their final resting place. There is a searchable index to the 1157 individuals buried in the hospital cemetery. With only a few exceptions, individuals were buried without a headstone.<br>Because most individuals were buried in unmarked graves, hospital officials used a grid pattern and designated gravesites by their distance from stone markers placed at the end of each row. The 'Location' is the distance in feet and inches from the eastern marker west to the gravesite. <br><br>

Revision as of 06:41, 7 January 2011

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) collection contains tombstone inscriptions from Kansas cemeteries. This collection is described in Kansas Genealogy. Inscriptions from headstones in hundreds of small graveyards in every county of the state are recorded in Don L. Ford, Abandoned and Semi-Active Cemeteries of Kansas, 3 vols. (Decorah, Iowa: Anundsen Publishing, 1983-85; Family History Library book 978.1 V3f.)

  • Another collection of tombstone inscriptions is Cemetery Records of Kansas, 18 vols. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society, 1956-64; Family History Library book 978.1 V22; films 873686-90; fiche 6051176.) The index is in Family History Library book 978.1 V22 index; film 1320674 item 42).  
  • The Reno County, Kansas, Genealogical Society Web page site has interment lists for all fifty four county cemeteries. 
  •  The Topeka State Hospital, a publicly funded institution for the care and treatment of the mentally ill in Topeka, Kansas, was in operation from 1872 to 1997. For some, the grounds of the hospital became their final resting place. There is a searchable index to the 1157 individuals buried in the hospital cemetery. With only a few exceptions, individuals were buried without a headstone.
    Because most individuals were buried in unmarked graves, hospital officials used a grid pattern and designated gravesites by their distance from stone markers placed at the end of each row. The 'Location' is the distance in feet and inches from the eastern marker west to the gravesite.

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