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◄ [[The Netherlands|Netherlands Homepage]] <br>  
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◄ [[The Netherlands|Netherlands Homepage]]{{Netherlands-sidebar}} <br>  
  
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{{Click|Image:Netherlands_ORP.png|Netherlands Online Genealogy Records}} <br>
 
== Burgelijke Stand / Civil Registration  ==
 
== Burgelijke Stand / Civil Registration  ==
  
 
'''General Historical Background'''  
 
'''General Historical Background'''  
  
The earliest vital records in the Netherlands were kept by the churches. Civil authorities began recording marriages and often also deaths of nonconformists in 1575. France annexed the country between 1795 and 1811.  
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From about 1550 onward, [[Netherlands Church Records|Church records]] began to be kept in the Netherlands. These record baptisms(or circumcisions), marriages and burials. Between 1795 and 1811 the Netherlands became increasingly influenced by France. Church records from that time, especially marriages and burials, became more detailed.  In 1810 the Netherlands was incorporated into the Napoleonic empire.  
  
'''On 6 January 1811''' the French Imperial (Napoleon) decree served notice that by '''1 March 1811''' all births, marriages and deaths had to be recorded by the civil authorities of each municipality. The civil officers were made responsible for keeping vital records. Civil registration was accomplished by requiring the people to report all births, marriages, and deaths to a civil registration office [Burgerlijke Stand], located in the municipality [gemeente]. After Napoleon's defeat, the Dutch government continued the civil registration system.  
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On 6 January 1811 the French Imperial (Napoleon) decree served notice that by '''1 March 1811''' all births, marriages and deaths had to be recorded by the civil authorities of each municipality. The civil officers were made responsible for keeping vital records. Civil registration was accomplished by requiring the people to report all births, marriages, and deaths to a civil registration office [Burgerlijke Stand], located in the municipality [gemeente]. After Napoleon's defeat, the Dutch government continued the civil registration system.  
  
In some southern areas Napoleon had already conquered, this recording had started earlier. After this date all individuals who lived in the Netherlands are recorded. They cover the entire population and have one year and 10 year indexes. Civil registration records are the most important source for genealogical research in the Netherlands and are easily accessible.  
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In Limburg and parts of Zeeland, civil registration began as early as 1795, because they had already been conquered by France. They cover the entire population and have one year and 10 year indexes. Civil registration records are the most important source for genealogical research in the Netherlands and are easily accessible.  
 
 
= Index at Genlias.nl =
 
 
 
A signficant database of extracted civil registration recrods from all over the Netherlands can be found at http://www.genlias.nl/en/page0.jsp. This is a joint effort of the government archives in the Netherlands. Genlias is a database in development. New information is added frequently. The information in Genlias is taken directly from the Civil Register, the most important Dutch source for genealogical research. Since 1811 the most important events in the life of every person resident in the Netherlands – birth, marriage and death – have been systematically recorded. Marriage records from all provinces were entered first into the system. Most of the participating archives are also entering records of birth and death. As of December 2011 over 64 million records had been extracted and posted. Many more since that date.
 
 
 
Not all the information contained in a record is added to the database. Only the essential data you need to reconstruct your family tree will be included. Once you find a person on Genlias.nl, then you can find the original record in Historical Records at FamilySearch.org or on some of the provincial archive websites such as http://www.drenlias.nl/ for Drenthe or http://www.allegroningers.nl/ for Groningen.<br>
 
  
 
== Geboorten / Births  ==
 
== Geboorten / Births  ==
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*The birth date of the child.  
 
*The birth date of the child.  
 
*The birth place of the child.  
 
*The birth place of the child.  
*The name of the child's parents.  
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*The names of the child's parents.
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*The residence of the parents
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*The ages and occupation of the parents.  
 
*The names, ages, occupations, and residences of the witnesses.  
 
*The names, ages, occupations, and residences of the witnesses.  
 
*The relationships of the witnesses to the child, if any.  
 
*The relationships of the witnesses to the child, if any.  
*The residence of the parents.
 
*The age and occupation of the parents.
 
 
*It will never say if the child is legitimate or illegitimate.
 
*It will never say if the child is legitimate or illegitimate.
  
If a child was born out of wedlock it will just not mention a father, even if he is known. If the child's parents do later marry and acknowlegde the child as theirs, it will mention this in the margin. At that time the last name of the child will also change from the mother's last name to the father's last name.<br>Remember, this means also that when you enter the surname (last name) of this illegitimate child you have to make it an "or" name - born as "van der VEER" but later became "van WAGENAAR" - "van der VEER '''''or''''' van WAGENAAR".<br>If you do not do this others will have a very hard time finding that person in the original records of births as the child is not born as van WAGENAAR and thus not found in any index as such, nor when you look for the date of birth. <br>On the other hand, if you put only the birth name down, you will not find him/her in any of the marriage or death indexes or records.
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If a child was born out of wedlock it will not usually mention a father, even if he is known. If the child's parents do later marry and the father acknowledge the child as his, it will mention this in the margin.At that time the last name of the child will also change from the mother's last name to the father's last name. However this does not mean that he is the biological father! If the child is illegitimate, but the father is named, there is no reason to suspect false paternity. [[Netherlands Church Records|Church Records]] may be of use in these situations, but are difficult to access.  
 
 
'''The following 5 steps will guide you in finding your ancestor in the Netherlands’ civil registration records.'''
 
 
 
''Step 1. Find the year of your ancestor's birth record.''
 
 
 
To find the birth records available at the Family History Library, look in the Family History Library Catalog. Select the Family History Library Catalog, and click on the tab for 'Place Search'; type in the name of the town and click 'Enter' to see if your ancestor's town is listed.
 
 
 
When looking for your ancestor's birth record, remember:
 
 
 
*Birth records are arranged chronologically.
 
*Birth records were kept by the civil registration office in the municipality where your ancestor lived.
 
*Yearly indexes and 10-year indexes to the birth records exist.
 
 
 
If you don't know which municipality your ancestor lived in, see the Netherlands gazetteer Van Goor's aardrijkskundig woordenboek van Nederland. Instructions for using this gazetteer are found in 'How to use the Netherlands Gazetteer'.
 
 
 
''Step 2. Find the entry for your ancestor.''
 
 
 
Use the index first. Look for the last name, and then look for the given name. Record the date of registration and entry number. Next locate the entry. If you do not know the exact year your ancestor was born, go to the 10 year indices and see if you can find the name there, it will tell you the date the person's information was registered. If you do not know the names of your ancestor's parents, you may have to check further to make sure you find the correct entry:
 
 
 
*Find the entries for all the children with the same given name and last name as your ancestor. Start with the year when you think your ancestor was born. Then check the entries for five years before and five years after. You may find several entries for children with the same name but with different parents.
 
*Eliminate the entries that contradict what you know about your ancestor. Check death records to see if any of the children died before your ancestor did. Check marriage records to see if any of the children married someone other than your ancestor's spouse (but remember that your ancestor may have married more than once).
 
*Make sure the birth entry is of your direct line ancestor. Because names are so common, you must be sure you have the correct entry.
 
 
 
''Step 3. Find the entries for each brother and sister of your ancestor.''
 
 
 
Once you have the entry for your ancestor, find the entries for your ancestor's brothers and sisters:
 
 
 
*Search the birth records for entries of your ancestor's brothers and sisters.
 
*Search local death records or the birth records from surrounding municipalities maybe check the web-sites), especially if there are gaps of 3 or more years between the births of siblings. Gaps of 3 or more years may indicate there was another child.
 
*To make sure you have found entries of all the family members, search death records and birth records of surrounding municipalities for any additional children.
 
*Search for children born before the parents' marriage. Children may have been born under the mother's maiden name. Sometimes the father's name is not given.
 
 
 
If the search is for ancestors born, married or died after 1811, always check to see if they are recorded on [http://genlias.nl/nl/page0.jsp Genlias].
 
 
 
''Step 4. Copy the information, and document your sources.''
 
 
 
If you can, photocopy the record or download it on a disc or flashdrive/thumbdrive. If you can't, be sure to copy all the information in the entry, including:
 
  
*All the people listed and their relationships to each other. (Remember, witnesses are often relatives.)
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<gallery perrow="3" heights="120px" widths="160px">
*All the dates in the entry and the events they pertain to. (Sometimes corrections to a birth record were added in the entry's margin.)
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Image: Netherlands Birth Registration.jpg|A Birth Record from 1841
*All the localities in the entry and who was from the places listed.
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Image: Netherlands Transcription of birth registrations.jpg|Dutch Transcription
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Image: Netherlands Translation of birth registrations.jpg|English Translation
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</gallery>
  
On the copy, document where the information came from. List:
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== Huwelijken / Marriages ==
 
 
*The type of source (a paper certificate, a microform, a book, an Internet site, and so forth).
 
*All reference numbers for the source. Carefully record any microfilm, book, or certificate numbers or the name and Internet address of the site you used.
 
 
 
''Step 5. Analyze the information you obtain from the birth record.''
 
 
 
To effectively use the information from the birth record, ask yourself the following questions:
 
 
 
*Is this the birth entry of my direct line ancestor? Because names are so common, you must be sure you have the correct record.
 
*Did the civil registrar identify both parents, and is the mother's maiden name given?
 
*Did more than 3 years pass since the birth of the last child? If so, another child may have been stillborn or born in a neighboring municipality.
 
*Did you search 5 years without finding any earlier birth entries of children? If you find no other entries, then begin looking for the parents' marriage record.
 
 
 
== Huwelijken / Marriage ==
 
 
 
'''What You Are Looking For'''
 
  
 
The following information will usually be found in a marriage entry:  
 
The following information will usually be found in a marriage entry:  
  
*The names of your ancestors.  
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*The names of the bride and the groom
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*The ages, residence, birthplace and occupations of the bride and groom.  
 
*The date of your ancestors' marriage.  
 
*The date of your ancestors' marriage.  
*The names of your ancestors' parents and their residence and occupation, if living.  
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*The names of the parents and their residence and occupation, if living.<br>
*The ages of your ancestors.
 
*The place of your ancestors' birth and/or where they were residing when married.
 
*The occupation of the groom.
 
 
*Whether the bride and groom were single or widowed before the marriage.  
 
*Whether the bride and groom were single or widowed before the marriage.  
 
*The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship to the bride or groom, if any. <br>
 
*The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship to the bride or groom, if any. <br>
  
The following 5 steps will guide you in finding your ancestor in the Netherlands civil registration records.
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The following records will usually be found in a Huwelijksbijlagen (Marriage supplement)  
 
 
''Step 1. Find the year of your ancestor's marriage record.''
 
 
 
To find the marriage records available at the library, look in the Family History Library Catalog. Go to the Family History Library Catalog, and click on the tab for 'Place Search'; type in the name of the town and click 'Enter' to see if your ancestor's town is listed. If you can't find it listed you can search in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Geography Wikipedia] and search for the town. If it states that it is a municipality, it means that it has its own governmental records, if it states that it is a village in ..... (name of city) then you need to look for records in that city.
 
 
 
When looking for your ancestor's marriage record, remember:
 
 
 
*Marriage records are arranged chronologically.
 
*Marriage records were kept by the civil registration office in the municipality where your ancestor lived.
 
*Yearly indexes and 10-year indexes to the marriage records exist.
 
*The index is arranged by the husband's last name.
 
 
 
''Step 2. Find the entry for your ancestor.''
 
 
 
Use the index first. Look for the last name, and then look for the given name. Record the date of marriage and entry number. Next locate the entry. For more help in finding the record entry, see Tip 1.
 
 
 
*''Tip 1.''
 
 
 
How do I find the entry of my ancestor? In some indexes, only the first letter of the surname is in alphabetical order. The index may only contain grooms' names. A brides index may be separate or not exist.
 
 
 
For help in reading the record entry, see Tip 2.
 
 
 
*''Tip 2.''
 
 
 
What if I can't read the record? Civil registration records are written in Dutch. The language used in the record may also be in French during the time Napoleon occupied the country. See the [[Netherlands Language and Languages]] or [[France Language and Languages]]. <br>
 
  
''Step 3. Copy the information, and document your sources.''
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*Copies of birth or baptism records of bride and groom
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*Military conscription record of groom, containing name, birthdate, and parents, and sometimes a physical description
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*Copies of death or burial records of deceased former
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*Copies of death or burial records of parents, if the marrying person is under 30 (and sometimes if they are over 30)
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*In earlier years (pre 1850), if both parents are dead, and they are under 30, death or burials records of grandparents.
  
If you can, photocopy the record or download it on a disc or flashdrive/thumbdrive. If you can't, be sure to copy all the information in the entry, including:
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The following records related to marriage also exist
  
*All the people listed and their relationships to each other. (Remember, witnesses are often relatives.)
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*'''Marriage Intentions''' [''Huwelijksaangiften''] were made a few days before the first marriage proclamation. The couple were required to announce their intention to marry in the residence of both bride and groom. This allowed other community members the opportunity to raise any objections to the marriage. The intentions give the couple’s names, ages, marital statuses before the marriage, occupations, and residences. From 1811 to 1879 the records were combined with the marriage proclamations in one register. After 1879 they were placed in separate registers. They were not prepared in duplicate and are not indexed. Marriage intentions were discontinued in 1935.  
*All the dates in the entry and the events they pertain to.  
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*'''Marriage Proclamations''' [''Huwelijksafkondigingen''], also called marriage banns, were published for two weeks in a row. They provide the couple’s names, ages, marital statuses before the marriage, occupations, and residences. They also give the names of the parents and their occupations, residences, and marital statuses. Like the marriage intentions, the proclamations were not prepared in duplicate and are not indexed. They were kept in the same register as the intentions until 1879 and were discontinued in 1935.
*All the localities in the entry and who was from the places listed.
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*'''Marriage Consents''' [''Huwelijkstoestemmingen'']. Parents were normally present at the wedding and stated that they gave their consent for the couple to marry. If parents were absent, their written permission would be included with the marriage supplements. Beginning in 1913, separate registers were used to record the parents’ permission for the bride and groom to marry.
  
On the copy, document where the information came from. List:  
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<br> <gallery perrow="3" heights="120px" widths="160px">
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Image: Netherlands Marriage Registration.jpg|A Marriage record from 1901
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Image: Netherlands Transcription of Marriage Registration.jpg|Dutch Transcription
 +
Image: Netherlands Translation of Marriage Registration.jpg|English Translation
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</gallery>
  
*The type of source (a paper certificate, a microform, a book, an Internet site, and so forth).
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== Echtscheidingen / Divorces  ==
*All reference numbers for the source. Carefully record any microfilm, book, or certificate numbers or the name and Internet address of the site you used.
 
  
''Step 4. Analyze the information you obtain from the marriage record.''
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Divorce cases are handled by the district courts. A record of the divorce will be recorded at the back of the marriage register of the municipality where the couple lived at the time of their divorce. For large cities in later years they will be in separate registers. There is usually a note in the margin of the original marriage record. Divorces before the 20th century were uncommon. <br>  
 
 
To effectively use the information from the marriage record, ask yourself the following questions:
 
 
 
*Is this the marriage entry of my direct line ancestors? Because names are so common, you must be sure you have the correct record.
 
*Were additional event dates, such as birth, death, etc., given in the entry? (Each couple had to produce identifying documents including copies of their birth/christening certificates, death certificates of parents and/or former spouses, and sometimes of grandparents if applicable.) While these documents are contained in a separate packet, the information may also be recorded within the marriage entry.
 
 
 
== Echtscheidingen / Divorce Records  ==
 
 
 
Divorce cases are handled by the district courts. A record of the divorce will be recorded at the back of the marriage register of the municipality where the couple lived at the time of their divorce. For large cities in later years they will be in separate registers. There is sometimes a note in the margin of the original marriage record. Divorces before the 20th century were uncommon. <br>  
 
  
 
== Overlijden / Deaths  ==
 
== Overlijden / Deaths  ==
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Death records are especially helpful because they may provide important information on a person’s birth, spouse, and parents. Civil death records often exist for individuals whom there are no birth or marriage records for. Deaths were usually registered within three days of the death in the municipality where the person died. If the deceased person was not a resident of that town, often a copy would be sent to that person's residence.  
 
Death records are especially helpful because they may provide important information on a person’s birth, spouse, and parents. Civil death records often exist for individuals whom there are no birth or marriage records for. Deaths were usually registered within three days of the death in the municipality where the person died. If the deceased person was not a resident of that town, often a copy would be sent to that person's residence.  
  
Information you can find in the death record:
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The following information will usually be found in a death record  
  
*The names of your ancestors.  
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*The name of the deceased.  
*The date of your ancestors' death.  
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*The date of death.  
*The names of your ancestors' parents.  
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*The names of the deceased's parents.  
*The names of your ancestors' spouse.  
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*The name of the deceased's spouse.  
*The age of your ancestor at the time of death.  
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*The age of the deceased at the time of death.  
*The place of your ancestors' birth.  
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*The place of the deceased's birth.  
 
*The occupation of the deceased.  
 
*The occupation of the deceased.  
 
*The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship if any.
 
*The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship if any.
  
Remember, married women are always recorded under their maiden surname. The informant’s name (often a relative) is also given.<br>Information about parents, the birth date and birthplace of the deceased, and other information in a death record may be inaccurate since the person who gave the information may not have had complete information.  
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Remember, married women are always recorded under their maiden surname. The informant’s name (often a relative) is also given.<br><br>Information about parents, the birth date and birthplace of the deceased, and other information in a death record may be inaccurate since the person who gave the information may not have had complete information.  
 
 
Children who died before the declaration of birth was made, are recorded as stillborn and are found only in the death records. This also means that when a child is recorded as stillborn it may not necessarily be true, as a birth had to be recorded within 3 days of birth. In other words, if the child died within those three days, it would most likely not be recorded in the birth records.
 
 
 
When looking for a stillborn child you may have to look in the index under 'L' for 'Levenloos' (stillborn), or under the father's or mother's last name.
 
 
 
Those people who were born without a fixed surname are probably recorded under a different name (like a patronymic surname) in the death records.
 
 
 
The Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie or [http://194.171.109.12/lang/EN cbg] has records of everyone who has died since 1940.
 
 
 
Following are examples of birth, marriage and death records translated from original records:
 
 
 
Civil Registration - births
 
 
 
Number ninety-one
 
 
 
Today, the 6th of August eighteen hundred sixty -three, appeared before us (name of registrar) Frederic Louis Rambonnet, Burgermeester (mayor) , official of the civil registration office of the Gemeente Wijhe; Jan Westerveld, age forty years, day laborer, living in Wijhe, assisted by two witnesses, the first one named Lucas Eikelboom, age forty-nine years, farmer or builder (occupation) , and the second Hendrikus Johannes Christinus van Assen, age thirty-three years, blacksmith (occupation) , living in Wijhe, who has declared before us that his wife Willemina de Weerd, a laborer by occupation on the sixth of this [month] in the morning at three o’clock gave birth to a child of female gender , and to whom the first name of Martha Hendrika is given, from which declaration we have created this record, which, after having been read, is signed by us and the witnesses.
 
 
 
<br> Civil Registration - marriages
 
 
 
<br> Number eighteen
 
 
 
Today, the twenty-ninth of April in the year one thousand eight hundred fifty-eight, appeared before us Willem Christiaan Theodorus van Nahuijs, mayor, official of the civil registration office of the gemeente Wijhe in the public area of the town hall
 
 
 
Jan Westerveld, age thiry-five years, born and living in Wijhe , day laborer, of age son of Gerrit Westerveld, and of Marta Dollemans, by occupation farmers (or builders) , both living in Wijhe, and Willemina de Weerd, age thirty-three years, born in Heerde and living in Wijhe, day laborer, widow of Aalt Huge van de Beek, of age daughter of Hendrik Jan Geerlig de Weerd, and of Jennigje Boldewijn, both deceased
 
 
 
who asked us to perform their anticipated marriage, for which the public announcements had been made in front of the main door of the city hall here, on Sunday, the eighteenth, and Sunday, the twenty-fifth of April eighteen hundred fifty-eight, at eleven o’clock in the morning.
 
 
 
Since no objections to the said marriage were known to us, we have, after the future marriage partners had declared that they would take each other for spouses and dutifully fulfill all their duties, which are associated by the Law with the state of matrimony , declared in the name of the Law that
 
 
 
Jan Westerveld and Willemina de Weerd are united in marriage.
 
 
 
Of which we have created this record in the presence of
 
 
 
Lammert Halfwerk, age fourty-nine years, capenter, Willem Neppelenbroek, age fifty-three years, farmer Jozienus Eduard van Assen, age thirty-two years, employed by the Canton, and Jan Willem Broekhus, age fifty-four years, day laborer, all living in Wijhe, who have signed this record, after it had been read , together with us and the contracting parties.
 
 
 
Death Record
 
 
 
Number twenty-six
 
 
 
Today the seventeenth of March eighteen hundred fifty-seven appeared before us, Willem Christiaan Theodorus van Nahuijs, mayor, official of the civil registration office of the gemeente Wijhe
 
 
 
Jan Westerveld, age thirty-four years, and Berend Gerrits van der Wijk, age forty-three years, day laborers, both living in Wijhe
 
 
 
who have told us that Aalt Huge van de Beek, age thirty-nine years, born in Hattem, day laborer, spouse of Willemina de Weerd, by occupation a day laborer, living in Wijhe, son of Jan van de Beek and Fennigje Kolkers, day laborers living inHattem
 
 
 
living in Wijhe, has died on the sixteenth of this months at three o’clock in the afternoon at his home in the hamlet of Herxen.
 
 
 
Of which declaration we have written up this record, which, after having been read, was signed by us and the first witness; the second one did not know how to write.
 
 
 
<br> Marriage Supplements (Huwelijksbijlagen)
 
 
 
1. Extract of the husband’s birth
 
 
 
Overijssel Province Gemeente Wijhe
 
 
 
Civil Registration
 
 
 
Extract from the birth register of the above-named Gemeente
 
  
In the year one thousand eight hundred twenty-two on the twenty-first of the month of December was born Jan , son of Gerrit Westerveld and Marta Dollemans
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Children who died before the declaration of birth was made are recorded as stillborn and are found only in the death records. This also means that when a child is recorded as stillborn it may not necessarily be true, as a birth had to be recorded within 3 days of birth. In other words, if the child died within those three days, it would most likely not be recorded in the birth records. When looking for a stillborn child you may have to look in the index under 'L' for 'Levenloos' (stillborn),  
  
As extract the mayor , official of the civil registration of the gemeente Wijhe. Wijhe, 17 April 1858
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Those people who were born without a fixed surname are probably recorded under a patronymic or were "given" a surname posthumously, often based on the farm they were born at or lived at.  
  
<br> 2. Extract of the wife’s birth
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<br> <gallery perrow="3" heights="120px" widths="160px">
 +
Image: Netherlands Death Registration.jpg|A Death record from 1922
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Image: Netherlands Transcription of death registrations.jpg|Dutch Transcription
 +
Image: Netherlands Translation of death registrations.jpg|English Translation
 +
</gallery>
  
Civil Registration
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== Overlijden/ Deaths after 1940  ==
  
Province Gelderland Arrondissement Arnhem Gemeente Heerde
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See the page [[Netherlands Population Registers]] for information about ordering these records. These records are not Civil Registration. 
  
Extract From the birth register of the Gemeente Heerde was extracted that Willemina, daughter of Hendrik Jan Geerlig de Weerd and Jennigje Boldewyn- married couple- was born on the seventh of April eighteen hundred thirty five crossed out and corrected in the margin to “eighteen hundred twenty five” in Heerde.
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== Finding Netherlands Civil Registration Records Online  ==
  
[signed by the registrar and certified as a proper copy on the bottom]
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Access to Netherlands Civil Registration records online is excellent. There is usually no longer any need to use microfilms from the Family History Library, or to visit archives. Nearly all records have survived, since two copies were made of each record and stored separately 
  
3. Militia certificate
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Law allows Birth records up to 1916, marriage records up to 1941 and death records up to 1966 to be released to the public as of 2017. Archives can be up to 10 years behind putting them online.   
  
National Militia Province Overijssel Certificate
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'''First search these sites to find a record:''' 
  
The King’s commissioner in the province of Overijssel declares that Jan Westerveld, born in Wijhe on 21 December 1822, chair maker, son of Gerrit and of Marta Dollemans, by occupation nietdekken is enrolled in the National Militia in the gemeente of Wijhe, that in the lottery he received number 34, and that he is exempt in accordance with the decision made by the military council, which was held at Zwolle, .................... ......................... ................................... .  
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* [https://www.wiewaswie.nl/ WieWasWie] is the official government site and has almost all marriages online, many deaths and some births. Some will have a link to the original image attached. For free you can search for 1 or 2 people with an exact spelling. With a subscription you can search with wildcards. [http://wiewaswie.info/inhoud/watziterin.php WatZitErIn] has a list of what is available on WieWasWie, however the dates it gives are often inaccurate.
 +
* [https://www.openarch.nl/ OpenArchives] is another site, similiar to WieWasWie, but with slighly more records and a better search engine.  
 +
* The websites of local and provincial archives are all free, and may have slightly more records or better links to images than WieWasWie.
 +
* FamilySearch is beginning to put indexed records online. Most significant are their Delft and Amsterdam(partial) Births collections, which cannot be found on WieWasWie.
 +
* [http://geneaknowhow.net/digi/bronnen.html Geneaknowhow] has transcriptions and family reconstructions by individuals and local historical societies.  
 +
* The authorities drew up one and ten year indexes (''tienjarigetafels'') by municipality. The births, marriages and deaths are generally separate. These are both available on Zoekakten. The one year indexes are located at the end of each year's records. Ten year tables are located separately under ''Tafels''. The names will be alphabetically, though sometimes only the first letter is alphabetized. It will have the date of the record, though not the act number. Only the name of the main people(child, bride and grooms, deceased) will be included.  
 +
* Zoekakten also has some provincial indexes that cover an entire region or province for a large time period, and are arranged alphabetically.    
  
Given in Zwolle, on 15 April 1858
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'''Then find the original image if you have not already:'''
 +
* [[Zoekakten]] makes browsing images put online by FamilySearch much easier. It has nearly universal coverage of what has survived. The images are black and white, and some are poor quality.
 +
* The websites of local and provincial archives should also contain images. Often the quality and colour is better than those on FamilySearch/Zoekakten. <br>
  
the King’s Commissioner in the Province
 
  
The block on the left of the document, if filled in, provides a physical description of the individual (height, stature, eye/hair color, shape of face, chin etc. )
+
=== ''Additional steps for marriages''  ===
  
4. Death certificate of the wife’s first husband
+
Always view the Marriage supplements after you have found a marriage. The example below shows a typical scenario: 
  
Province Overijssel Gemeente Wijhe Civil Registration
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It is desired to find the marriage supplements of Cornelis Josephus Johannes Alewisius Baar and Maria Rijnders who married in Arnhem on 8 June 1881, act number 141.
  
Extract from the death register of the above-named Gemeente
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1. Go to Zoekakten, then GL, then Arnhem, then Huwelijksbijlagen, then the film for 1881 and part of 1882. Zoekakten has indexed this film. For 1881 the supplements take images 9-1730. This marriage is in June, so estimate just before halfway and try 800.
  
In the year one thousand eight hundred fifty-seven on the sixth of the month of March has passed away Aalt Huge van der Beek, husband of Willemina de Weerd.  
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2. Number cards on the corner exist here. Go thumbnail view and they can still be read. It can now be seen that an overestimate has been made, for image 771 is act number 145. Try image 750.  
  
Certified by the mayor, official of the civil registration office in the Gemeente Wijhe.  
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3. Thumbnail view from image 750 shows that act number 141 covers images 733-738. 
  
'''Wiki articles describing online collections are found at:'''
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In this example the supplements contain the follwing
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* Birth certificate of the groom
 +
* Military Conscription record of the groom
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* Birth certificate of the bride
 +
* Death certificate of the bride's mother
 +
* A copy of their Marriage Proclamation
  
*[[Netherlands, Gelderland Province Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]  
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<br> '''Wiki articles describing online collections are found at'''
*[[Netherlands Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]  
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* [[Netherlands, Drenthe Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
*[[Netherlands, Zuid-Holland Province Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)|Netherlands, Zuid-Holland Province Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Friesland Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Gelderland Province Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Groningen Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Limburg Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Noord-Brabant Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Noord-Holland, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Overijssel Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Utrecht Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Zeeland Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
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* [[Netherlands, Zuid-Holland Province, Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)]]
  
[[Category:Netherlands]]
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== References ==
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{{reflist}}
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[[Category:Netherlands_Civil_Registration]] [[Category:Civil_Registration]]

Latest revision as of 00:05, 27 January 2017

Netherlands Homepage

Netherlands Topics
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Beginning Research
Record Types
The Netherlands Background
Ethnicity
Local Research Resources
Moderator

The FamilySearch moderator for the Netherlands is Daniel Jones.



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Burgelijke Stand / Civil Registration

General Historical Background

From about 1550 onward, Church records began to be kept in the Netherlands. These record baptisms(or circumcisions), marriages and burials. Between 1795 and 1811 the Netherlands became increasingly influenced by France. Church records from that time, especially marriages and burials, became more detailed. In 1810 the Netherlands was incorporated into the Napoleonic empire.

On 6 January 1811 the French Imperial (Napoleon) decree served notice that by 1 March 1811 all births, marriages and deaths had to be recorded by the civil authorities of each municipality. The civil officers were made responsible for keeping vital records. Civil registration was accomplished by requiring the people to report all births, marriages, and deaths to a civil registration office [Burgerlijke Stand], located in the municipality [gemeente]. After Napoleon's defeat, the Dutch government continued the civil registration system.

In Limburg and parts of Zeeland, civil registration began as early as 1795, because they had already been conquered by France. They cover the entire population and have one year and 10 year indexes. Civil registration records are the most important source for genealogical research in the Netherlands and are easily accessible.

Geboorten / Births

The following information will usually be found in a birth entry:

  • The name of the child.
  • The birth date of the child.
  • The birth place of the child.
  • The names of the child's parents.
  • The residence of the parents
  • The ages and occupation of the parents.
  • The names, ages, occupations, and residences of the witnesses.
  • The relationships of the witnesses to the child, if any.
  • It will never say if the child is legitimate or illegitimate.

If a child was born out of wedlock it will not usually mention a father, even if he is known. If the child's parents do later marry and the father acknowledge the child as his, it will mention this in the margin.At that time the last name of the child will also change from the mother's last name to the father's last name. However this does not mean that he is the biological father! If the child is illegitimate, but the father is named, there is no reason to suspect false paternity. Church Records may be of use in these situations, but are difficult to access.

Huwelijken / Marriages

The following information will usually be found in a marriage entry:

  • The names of the bride and the groom
  • The ages, residence, birthplace and occupations of the bride and groom.
  • The date of your ancestors' marriage.
  • The names of the parents and their residence and occupation, if living.
  • Whether the bride and groom were single or widowed before the marriage.
  • The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship to the bride or groom, if any.

The following records will usually be found in a Huwelijksbijlagen (Marriage supplement)

  • Copies of birth or baptism records of bride and groom
  • Military conscription record of groom, containing name, birthdate, and parents, and sometimes a physical description
  • Copies of death or burial records of deceased former
  • Copies of death or burial records of parents, if the marrying person is under 30 (and sometimes if they are over 30)
  • In earlier years (pre 1850), if both parents are dead, and they are under 30, death or burials records of grandparents.

The following records related to marriage also exist

  • Marriage Intentions [Huwelijksaangiften] were made a few days before the first marriage proclamation. The couple were required to announce their intention to marry in the residence of both bride and groom. This allowed other community members the opportunity to raise any objections to the marriage. The intentions give the couple’s names, ages, marital statuses before the marriage, occupations, and residences. From 1811 to 1879 the records were combined with the marriage proclamations in one register. After 1879 they were placed in separate registers. They were not prepared in duplicate and are not indexed. Marriage intentions were discontinued in 1935.
  • Marriage Proclamations [Huwelijksafkondigingen], also called marriage banns, were published for two weeks in a row. They provide the couple’s names, ages, marital statuses before the marriage, occupations, and residences. They also give the names of the parents and their occupations, residences, and marital statuses. Like the marriage intentions, the proclamations were not prepared in duplicate and are not indexed. They were kept in the same register as the intentions until 1879 and were discontinued in 1935.
  • Marriage Consents [Huwelijkstoestemmingen]. Parents were normally present at the wedding and stated that they gave their consent for the couple to marry. If parents were absent, their written permission would be included with the marriage supplements. Beginning in 1913, separate registers were used to record the parents’ permission for the bride and groom to marry.

Echtscheidingen / Divorces

Divorce cases are handled by the district courts. A record of the divorce will be recorded at the back of the marriage register of the municipality where the couple lived at the time of their divorce. For large cities in later years they will be in separate registers. There is usually a note in the margin of the original marriage record. Divorces before the 20th century were uncommon.

Overlijden / Deaths

Death records are especially helpful because they may provide important information on a person’s birth, spouse, and parents. Civil death records often exist for individuals whom there are no birth or marriage records for. Deaths were usually registered within three days of the death in the municipality where the person died. If the deceased person was not a resident of that town, often a copy would be sent to that person's residence.

The following information will usually be found in a death record

  • The name of the deceased.
  • The date of death.
  • The names of the deceased's parents.
  • The name of the deceased's spouse.
  • The age of the deceased at the time of death.
  • The place of the deceased's birth.
  • The occupation of the deceased.
  • The names of the witnesses, their ages, occupations, residence, and relationship if any.

Remember, married women are always recorded under their maiden surname. The informant’s name (often a relative) is also given.

Information about parents, the birth date and birthplace of the deceased, and other information in a death record may be inaccurate since the person who gave the information may not have had complete information.

Children who died before the declaration of birth was made are recorded as stillborn and are found only in the death records. This also means that when a child is recorded as stillborn it may not necessarily be true, as a birth had to be recorded within 3 days of birth. In other words, if the child died within those three days, it would most likely not be recorded in the birth records. When looking for a stillborn child you may have to look in the index under 'L' for 'Levenloos' (stillborn),

Those people who were born without a fixed surname are probably recorded under a patronymic or were "given" a surname posthumously, often based on the farm they were born at or lived at.


Overlijden/ Deaths after 1940

See the page Netherlands Population Registers for information about ordering these records. These records are not Civil Registration.

Finding Netherlands Civil Registration Records Online

Access to Netherlands Civil Registration records online is excellent. There is usually no longer any need to use microfilms from the Family History Library, or to visit archives. Nearly all records have survived, since two copies were made of each record and stored separately

Law allows Birth records up to 1916, marriage records up to 1941 and death records up to 1966 to be released to the public as of 2017. Archives can be up to 10 years behind putting them online.

First search these sites to find a record:

  • WieWasWie is the official government site and has almost all marriages online, many deaths and some births. Some will have a link to the original image attached. For free you can search for 1 or 2 people with an exact spelling. With a subscription you can search with wildcards. WatZitErIn has a list of what is available on WieWasWie, however the dates it gives are often inaccurate.
  • OpenArchives is another site, similiar to WieWasWie, but with slighly more records and a better search engine.
  • The websites of local and provincial archives are all free, and may have slightly more records or better links to images than WieWasWie.
  • FamilySearch is beginning to put indexed records online. Most significant are their Delft and Amsterdam(partial) Births collections, which cannot be found on WieWasWie.
  • Geneaknowhow has transcriptions and family reconstructions by individuals and local historical societies.
  • The authorities drew up one and ten year indexes (tienjarigetafels) by municipality. The births, marriages and deaths are generally separate. These are both available on Zoekakten. The one year indexes are located at the end of each year's records. Ten year tables are located separately under Tafels. The names will be alphabetically, though sometimes only the first letter is alphabetized. It will have the date of the record, though not the act number. Only the name of the main people(child, bride and grooms, deceased) will be included.
  • Zoekakten also has some provincial indexes that cover an entire region or province for a large time period, and are arranged alphabetically.

Then find the original image if you have not already:

  • Zoekakten makes browsing images put online by FamilySearch much easier. It has nearly universal coverage of what has survived. The images are black and white, and some are poor quality.
  • The websites of local and provincial archives should also contain images. Often the quality and colour is better than those on FamilySearch/Zoekakten.


Additional steps for marriages

Always view the Marriage supplements after you have found a marriage. The example below shows a typical scenario:

It is desired to find the marriage supplements of Cornelis Josephus Johannes Alewisius Baar and Maria Rijnders who married in Arnhem on 8 June 1881, act number 141.

1. Go to Zoekakten, then GL, then Arnhem, then Huwelijksbijlagen, then the film for 1881 and part of 1882. Zoekakten has indexed this film. For 1881 the supplements take images 9-1730. This marriage is in June, so estimate just before halfway and try 800.

2. Number cards on the corner exist here. Go thumbnail view and they can still be read. It can now be seen that an overestimate has been made, for image 771 is act number 145. Try image 750.

3. Thumbnail view from image 750 shows that act number 141 covers images 733-738.

In this example the supplements contain the follwing

  • Birth certificate of the groom
  • Military Conscription record of the groom
  • Birth certificate of the bride
  • Death certificate of the bride's mother
  • A copy of their Marriage Proclamation


Wiki articles describing online collections are found at

References