Difference between revisions of "Norway Occupations"

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| Occupations were a measure of social status. Some trades were viewed as more prestigious than others. For example, goldsmiths had more prestige than shoemakers. Many trades, such as butchers, tanners, shoemakers, tailors, and others were organized into guilds, which were in charge of training apprentices and regulating a trade's practice in an area.
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Guilds were usually established in each city. Guild records include lists of members, information on journeymen practicing in the town, marriages of journeymen, and advancements from the rank of apprentice to journeyman and from journeyman to master craftsman. In addition, contracts between masters and parents of apprentices may be included.
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<big>[[Portal:Norway|'''''Norway''''']] </big>''<big>Occupations</big>''  
 
<big>[[Portal:Norway|'''''Norway''''']] </big>''<big>Occupations</big>''  
  

Revision as of 15:27, 2 April 2009

Occupations were a measure of social status. Some trades were viewed as more prestigious than others. For example, goldsmiths had more prestige than shoemakers. Many trades, such as butchers, tanners, shoemakers, tailors, and others were organized into guilds, which were in charge of training apprentices and regulating a trade's practice in an area.

Guilds were usually established in each city. Guild records include lists of members, information on journeymen practicing in the town, marriages of journeymen, and advancements from the rank of apprentice to journeyman and from journeyman to master craftsman. In addition, contracts between masters and parents of apprentices may be included.


Norway Occupations