Difference between revisions of "Previous Jurisdictions to Land in Arizona"

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[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png|go to]] [[Arizona|Arizona]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png|go to]] Previous Jurisdictions to land in Arizona
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[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png|go to]] [[Arizona|Arizona]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png|go to]] Previous Jurisdictions to land in Arizona  
  
===Previous Jurisdictions and Record Repositories ===
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=== Previous Jurisdictions and Record Repositories ===
  
Locating records of your ancestors
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Locating records of your ancestors  
*Find where your ancestor lived
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*Identify when your ancestor live there
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*Find where your ancestor lived  
*Locate the jurisdiction covering the land where your ancestor lived
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*Identify when your ancestor live there  
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*Locate the jurisdiction covering the land where your ancestor lived  
 
*Determine the record repositories for that jurisdiction
 
*Determine the record repositories for that jurisdiction
  
For example, suppose you believe your ancestor lived in Tucson, Arizona in 1861.
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For example, suppose you believe your ancestor lived in Tucson, Arizona in 1861.  
*In the present day, Tucson is indeed located in the State of Arizona.
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*But Arizona didn't exist in 1856. Arizona Territory wasn't created until 1863.
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*In the present day, Tucson is indeed located in the State of Arizona.  
*Before that, the land belonged to New Mexico Territory, which was created in 1850. So your ancestor lived in New Mexico Territory. This jurisdiction still exists today as the State of New Mexico.
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*But Arizona didn't exist in 1856. Arizona Territory wasn't created until 1863.  
*In 1853, the US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico, which contained land south of the Gila River. This is the land where Tucson is located. In 1854, this land was given to New Mexico Territory and in 1855 this land was added to Dona Ana county.
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*Before that, the land belonged to New Mexico Territory, which was created in 1850. So your ancestor lived in New Mexico Territory. This jurisdiction still exists today as the State of New Mexico.  
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*In 1853, the US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico, which contained land south of the Gila River. This is the land where Tucson is located. In 1854, this land was given to New Mexico Territory and in 1855 this land was added to Dona Ana county.  
 
*Then in 1860, New Mexico created Arizona county from the land in Dona Ana county. Arizona County existed totally within the present day State of Arizona. So your ancestor lived in Arizona County in the New Mexico Territory. But Arizona county was discontinued in 1862, then recreated in 1863 and finally discontinued again when Arizona Territory was created in 1863. The records from this extinct county are found in the present day in Dona Ana County in the State of New Mexico.
 
*Then in 1860, New Mexico created Arizona county from the land in Dona Ana county. Arizona County existed totally within the present day State of Arizona. So your ancestor lived in Arizona County in the New Mexico Territory. But Arizona county was discontinued in 1862, then recreated in 1863 and finally discontinued again when Arizona Territory was created in 1863. The records from this extinct county are found in the present day in Dona Ana County in the State of New Mexico.
Putting this altogether, your ancestor actually lived in Tucson, Arizona County, New Mexico Territory in 1861. Therefore look for records in Tucson, Dona Ana County, and the State of New Mexico archives.
 
  
Sometimes, records were recorded in a county where your ancestor did not live. Maybe there was confusion as to where the borders lay. Or maybe it was a shorter distance to the neighboring county seat. There could be several reasons, so don't overlook records in nearby counties. But treat this as the exception to the rule and check the most obvious county first.
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Putting this altogether, your ancestor actually lived in Tucson, Arizona County, New Mexico Territory in 1861. Therefore look for records in Tucson, Dona Ana County, and the State of New Mexico archives.
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Sometimes, records were recorded in a county where your ancestor did not live. Maybe there was confusion as to where the borders lay. Or maybe it was a shorter distance to the neighboring county seat. There could be several reasons, so don't overlook records in nearby counties. But treat this as the exception to the rule and check the most obvious county first.  
  
===Spanish and Mexican land (from 1820 to 1846) that would later become Arizona  ===
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=== Spanish and Mexican land (from 1820 to 1846) that would later become Arizona  ===
  
 
Spain laid claim to much of the land in the present day southwestern US. Because of the great distances and the hostilities of the Indian tribes, Spanish rule was only extended to the southern portion of present day Arizona, and at times not even that much. Tucson was the only permanent town established.  
 
Spain laid claim to much of the land in the present day southwestern US. Because of the great distances and the hostilities of the Indian tribes, Spanish rule was only extended to the southern portion of present day Arizona, and at times not even that much. Tucson was the only permanent town established.  
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Spain establish the practice of giving land grants to encourage settlement on the fringes of their rule. Mexico continued this practice. All Spanish and Mexican land grants were located in the Gadsden Purchase. If you stand in downtown Tucson and and look to the southeast corner of present day Arizona, then turn 90 degrees to your right along the border. All of these Spanish and Mexican Land Grants are located in that triangle.  
 
Spain establish the practice of giving land grants to encourage settlement on the fringes of their rule. Mexico continued this practice. All Spanish and Mexican land grants were located in the Gadsden Purchase. If you stand in downtown Tucson and and look to the southeast corner of present day Arizona, then turn 90 degrees to your right along the border. All of these Spanish and Mexican Land Grants are located in that triangle.  
  
1820 - The San Ignacio de la Canoa Grant. Two brothers petitioned the governor of Sonora/Sinaloa for four leagues (sitios) to raise cattle and horses. Title was issued by Mexico in 1849 and Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1899. This land grand was located on both sides of Interstate 19 south of Green Valley (that town is in the northwest corner of the grant).
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1820 - The San Ignacio de la Canoa Grant. Two brothers petitioned the governor of Sonora/Sinaloa for four leagues (sitios) to raise cattle and horses. Title was issued by Mexico in 1849 and Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1899. This land grand was located on both sides of Interstate 19 south of Green Valley (that town is in the northwest corner of the grant).  
  
1820 - The San Bernardino Grant south of Bisbee was also applied for by Ignacio de Perez, a Spanish lieutenant, who paid $90 for four leagues. The grant was surveyed in 1821 and recorded in Arizpe, Sonora but no title was ever issued. Most of the grant is located south of the border. The Court of Private Land Claims confirmed only the 2,383 acres that are on the American side.
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1820 - The San Bernardino Grant south of Bisbee was also applied for by Ignacio de Perez, a Spanish lieutenant, who paid $90 for four leagues. The grant was surveyed in 1821 and recorded in Arizpe, Sonora but no title was ever issued. Most of the grant is located south of the border. The Court of Private Land Claims confirmed only the 2,383 acres that are on the American side.  
  
1821 - Southwest of Patagonia is the San José de Sonoita Grant, the smallest grant made in Arizona. It was applied for in 1821 by Leon Herreras, a resident of Tubac, who had it surveyed and who received a Mexican title in 1825 for 7,598 acres. Court of Private Land Claims rejected that title on the grounds that the treasurer of Sonora had no authority to sell land in that area, but U. S. Supreme Court overturned the rejection. However it only confirmed 5,123 acres.
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1821 - Southwest of Patagonia is the San José de Sonoita Grant, the smallest grant made in Arizona. It was applied for in 1821 by Leon Herreras, a resident of Tubac, who had it surveyed and who received a Mexican title in 1825 for 7,598 acres. Court of Private Land Claims rejected that title on the grounds that the treasurer of Sonora had no authority to sell land in that area, but U. S. Supreme Court overturned the rejection. However it only confirmed 5,123 acres.  
  
 
1821 - The San Rafael de la Zanja Grant, just to the north of the Mexican border, east of the Patagonia Mountains. The four-league grant was sold at public auction for $1,297 and title was issued by Mexico in 1825. Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1902.  
 
1821 - The San Rafael de la Zanja Grant, just to the north of the Mexican border, east of the Patagonia Mountains. The four-league grant was sold at public auction for $1,297 and title was issued by Mexico in 1825. Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1902.  
  
24 Aug 1821 - The Treaty of Cordoba was signed by [[Spain]], which recognized [[Mexico]]'s independence. Land in present day Arizona became part of the Republic of Mexico.<ref>Beers, 100; "Mexican War of Independence," New Handbook of Texas, 4:698</ref> But effectively Mexico only controlled the southern part, which was placed in the State of Vieja California. Look for records in the [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Spain and Mexico Archives]].
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24 Aug 1821 - The Treaty of Cordoba was signed by [[Spain]], which recognized [[Mexico]]'s independence. Land in present day Arizona became part of the Republic of Mexico.<ref>Beers, 100; "Mexican War of Independence," New Handbook of Texas, 4:698</ref> But effectively Mexico only controlled the southern part, which was placed in the State of Vieja California. Look for records in the [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Spain and Mexico Archives]].  
  
1827 - The Buena Vista Grant straddles the international boundary just east of Nogales and two thirds of it is in Mexico.
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1827 - The Buena Vista Grant straddles the international boundary just east of Nogales and two thirds of it is in Mexico.  
  
1827 - The San Ignacio del Babocomari Grant looks on a map like a twenty miles long boomerang north and west of Fort Huachuca. The petitioners paid in 1827 all of $380 for the nearly fifty-three square miles of the grant.
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1827 - The San Ignacio del Babocomari Grant looks on a map like a twenty miles long boomerang north and west of Fort Huachuca. The petitioners paid in 1827 all of $380 for the nearly fifty-three square miles of the grant.  
  
1827 - The San Juan de las Boquillas y Nogales Grant is located along the San Pedro River west of Tombstone. Title was issued in 1833  
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1827 - The San Juan de las Boquillas y Nogales Grant is located along the San Pedro River west of Tombstone. Title was issued in 1833  
  
1827 - The San Rafael del Valle Grant is adjoined to the San Juan grant on the south. Title was issued in 1832. The San Rafael Grant was at first rejected by Court of Private Land Claims, but the rejection was overturned in the U.S. Supreme Court.
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1827 - The San Rafael del Valle Grant is adjoined to the San Juan grant on the south. Title was issued in 1832. The San Rafael Grant was at first rejected by Court of Private Land Claims, but the rejection was overturned in the U.S. Supreme Court.  
  
===New Mexico Territory land (from 1846 To 1863) that would later become Arizona  ===
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=== New Mexico Territory land (from 1846 To 1863) that would later become Arizona  ===
  
18 Aug 1846 - During the war with [[Mexico]], the US took control of Santa Fe and proclaimed sovereignty over the land that later became the [[New Mexico]] Territory.<ref>Williams 108-110</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].
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18 Aug 1846 - During the war with [[Mexico]], the US took control of Santa Fe and proclaimed sovereignty over the land that later became the [[New Mexico]] Territory.<ref>Williams 108-110</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].  
  
4 July 1848 - The US obtained clear title to the previous [[Mexico]] land. Through the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Mexico ceded all of present day [[California]], [[Nevada]], and [[Utah]], and parts of present day [[Arizona]], [[Colorado]], [[New Mexico]], and [[Wyoming]]. Part of the international boundary was in dispute.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 9, pp. 922-943; Parry, 102: 29-59; Van Zandt, 11, 28-29; Walker and Bufkin, 19, 20A</ref> The land south of the Gila River in present day Arizona was not ceded, it remained in control of Mexico. Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].
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4 July 1848 - The US obtained clear title to the previous [[Mexico]] land. Through the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Mexico ceded all of present day [[California]], [[Nevada]], and [[Utah]], and parts of present day [[Arizona]], [[Colorado]], [[New Mexico]], and [[Wyoming]]. Part of the international boundary was in dispute.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 9, pp. 922-943; Parry, 102: 29-59; Van Zandt, 11, 28-29; Walker and Bufkin, 19, 20A</ref> The land south of the Gila River in present day Arizona was not ceded, it remained in control of Mexico. Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].  
  
13 Dec 1850 - The US created the [[New Mexico]] Territory from unorganized federal land.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 9, ch. 49[1850]/pp. 446-452; Baldwin, 117-137; Van Zandt, 28-29, 162-165</ref> This territory named after the country of Mexico. Some counties were created, but they were small and covered land only in present day New Mexico. The land in the present day Arizona was at that time unorganized county land. Also the land south of the Gila River still belonged to [[Mexico]]. Look for records in the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].
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13 Dec 1850 - The US created the [[New Mexico]] Territory from unorganized federal land.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 9, ch. 49[1850]/pp. 446-452; Baldwin, 117-137; Van Zandt, 28-29, 162-165</ref> This territory named after the country of Mexico. Some counties were created, but they were small and covered land only in present day New Mexico. The land in the present day Arizona was at that time unorganized county land. Also the land south of the Gila River still belonged to [[Mexico]]. Look for records in the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]] and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].  
  
9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundaries of [[Bernalillo County, New Mexico|Bernalillo]], [[Rio Arriba County, New Mexico|Rio Arriba]], [[Santa Ana County, New Mexico|Santa Ana (extinct)]], [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos]], and [[Valencia County, New Mexico|Valencia]] counties were stretched across present day [[Arizona]] and [[Nevada]] to the California border.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /p. 292</ref> Look for records in [http://www.bernco.gov/ Bernalillo], [http://www.rio-arriba.org/ Rio Arriba], [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos], and [http://www.co.valencia.nm.us/ Valencia] counties.<br>
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9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundaries of [[Bernalillo County, New Mexico|Bernalillo]], [[Rio Arriba County, New Mexico|Rio Arriba]], [[Santa Ana County, New Mexico|Santa Ana (extinct)]], [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos]], and [[Valencia County, New Mexico|Valencia]] counties were stretched across present day [[Arizona]] and [[Nevada]] to the California border.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /p. 292</ref> Look for records in [http://www.bernco.gov/ Bernalillo], [http://www.rio-arriba.org/ Rio Arriba], [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos], and [http://www.co.valencia.nm.us/ Valencia] counties.<br> 9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of [[Socorro County, New Mexico|Socorro County]] was stretched across present day [[Arizona]] to the California border.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292</ref> Look for records in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socorro_County,_New_Mexico Socorro County].<br> 9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]] was stretched to include land in present day Arizona.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of [[Socorro County, New Mexico|Socorro County]] was stretched across present day [[Arizona]] to the California border.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292</ref> Look for records in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socorro_County,_New_Mexico Socorro County].<br>
 
9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]] was stretched to include land in present day Arizona.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].
 
  
30 Dec 1853 - The US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico. It contained lands south of the Gila River in present day [[Arizona]] and [[New Mexico]]. It also settled the International boundary dispute between the [[United States]] and [[Mexico]].<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 10, pp. 1031-1037; Van Zandt, 11, 29, 162</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]], and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].
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30 Dec 1853 - The US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico. It contained lands south of the Gila River in present day [[Arizona]] and [[New Mexico]]. It also settled the International boundary dispute between the [[United States]] and [[Mexico]].<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 10, pp. 1031-1037; Van Zandt, 11, 29, 162</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.archives.gov/ National Archives and Records Administration], the Mexico [[Mexico Archives and Libraries|Archives]], and the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].  
  
4 Aug 1854 - The land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase was officially added to [[New Mexico]] Territory, it became non-county land.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 10, ch. 245[1854]/p. 575; Van Zandt, 162; Walker and Bufkin, 21-22</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].
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4 Aug 1854 - The land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase was officially added to [[New Mexico]] Territory, it became non-county land.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 10, ch. 245[1854]/p. 575; Van Zandt, 162; Walker and Bufkin, 21-22</ref> Look for records in the [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives].  
  
 
3 Feb 1855 - [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]] gained all the land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1854, 4th assy. /p. 57</ref> The boundary was stretched across present day Arizona to the Baja California border. Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
 
3 Feb 1855 - [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]] gained all the land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase.<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1854, 4th assy. /p. 57</ref> The boundary was stretched across present day Arizona to the Baja California border. Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
  
1 Feb 1860 - New Mexico created [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] from land in [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1859-1860, 9th assy. /p. 74</ref> Arizona County was located entirely within present day Arizona. Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].
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1 Feb 1860 - New Mexico created [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] from land in [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1859-1860, 9th assy. /p. 74</ref> Arizona County was located entirely within present day Arizona. Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
  
12 Jan 1861 - New Mexico created San Juan (original, extinct) from land in [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1860-1861, 10th assy. /p. 16</ref> Look for records in [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos County].
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12 Jan 1861 - New Mexico created San Juan (original, extinct) from land in [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1860-1861, 10th assy. /p. 16</ref> Look for records in [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos County].  
  
18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued San Juan (original, extinct) returning the land to [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 16</ref> Look for records in [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos County]. <br>
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18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued San Juan (original, extinct) returning the land to [[Taos County, New Mexico|Taos County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 16</ref> Look for records in [http://www.taoscounty.org/ Taos County]. <br> 18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] returning the land to [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 18</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] returning the land to [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 18</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].
 
  
28 Jan 1863 - New Mexico re-created [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] from [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1862-1863, 12th assy. /p.30</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].
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28 Jan 1863 - New Mexico re-created [[Arizona County, New Mexico (Extinct)|Arizona County]] from [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Dona Ana County]].<ref>N.M. Terr. Laws 1862-1863, 12th assy. /p.30</ref> Look for records in [http://www.co.dona-ana.nm.us/ Dona Ana County].  
  
===Arizona land (from 1863 To Now) ===
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=== Arizona land (from 1863 To Now) ===
  
24 Feb 1863 - The US created the [[Arizona]] Territory from the western half of [[New Mexico]] Territory.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 12, ch. 56[1863]/pp. 664-665; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy./ pp. vii-viii; Van Zandt, 162</ref> All previous counties were discontinued for this new territory. Look for records in the [http://www.azlibrary.gov/Default.aspx Arizona State Library] and [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives]
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24 Feb 1863 - The US created the [[Arizona]] Territory from the western half of [[New Mexico]] Territory.<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 12, ch. 56[1863]/pp. 664-665; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy./ pp. vii-viii; Van Zandt, 162</ref> All previous counties were discontinued for this new territory. Look for records in the [http://www.azlibrary.gov/Default.aspx Arizona State Library] and [http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/archives_hm.htm New Mexico State Records Center and Archives]  
  
10 Nov 1864 - Arizona created four counties: [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave]], [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]], [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai]], and [[Yuma County, Arizona|Yuma]] counties.<ref>Howell Code, Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy., ch. 2/ pp. 24-25</ref> All four of these counties named for Indian tribes. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave], [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima], [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai], and [http://www.co.yuma.az.us/ Yuma] counties.
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10 Nov 1864 - Arizona created four counties: [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave]], [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]], [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai]], and [[Yuma County, Arizona|Yuma]] counties.<ref>Howell Code, Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy., ch. 2/ pp. 24-25</ref> All four of these counties named for Indian tribes. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave], [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima], [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai], and [http://www.co.yuma.az.us/ Yuma] counties.  
  
22 Dec 1865 - Arizona created [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute County]] from the northern half of [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1865, 2d assy./ pp. 19-20</ref> This county named for the Paiute Indians, using the spelling of that day. Both Mohave and Pah-Ute counties covered land which was later given to Nevada. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave County].
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22 Dec 1865 - Arizona created [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute County]] from the northern half of [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1865, 2d assy./ pp. 19-20</ref> This county named for the Paiute Indians, using the spelling of that day. Both Mohave and Pah-Ute counties covered land which was later given to Nevada. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave County].  
  
5 May 1866 - The US removed the northwest corner from [[Arizona]] Territory (parts of [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute]] and [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave]] counties) and gave that land to the State of [[Nevada]].<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 14, ch. 73[1866]/p. 43; Van Zandt, 158, 165; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1867, 3rd assy./ pp. 67-68; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1868, 4th assy./ pp. 68-69</ref> Nevada used that land to add to [[Lincoln County, Nevada|Lincoln]] and [[Nye County, Nevada|Nye]] counties. But Arizona previously had claim to that land and opposed this transfer, twice petitioning congress to repeal the law. Up thru 1868, representatives from Pah-Ute County attended the Arizona Legislature. Look for records in [http://nsla.nevadaculture.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=498&Itemid=416 Nevada State Library and Archives] and [http://www.azlibrary.gov/Default.aspx Arizona State Library]. Also the [http://www.lincolncountynv.org/about/county.htm Lincoln], [http://www.nyecounty.net/ Nye], and [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave] counties.
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5 May 1866 - The US removed the northwest corner from [[Arizona]] Territory (parts of [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute]] and [[Mohave County, Arizona|Mohave]] counties) and gave that land to the State of [[Nevada]].<ref>U.S. Stat., vol. 14, ch. 73[1866]/p. 43; Van Zandt, 158, 165; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1867, 3rd assy./ pp. 67-68; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1868, 4th assy./ pp. 68-69</ref> Nevada used that land to add to [[Lincoln County, Nevada|Lincoln]] and [[Nye County, Nevada|Nye]] counties. But Arizona previously had claim to that land and opposed this transfer, twice petitioning congress to repeal the law. Up thru 1868, representatives from Pah-Ute County attended the Arizona Legislature. Look for records in [http://nsla.nevadaculture.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=498&Itemid=416 Nevada State Library and Archives] and [http://www.azlibrary.gov/Default.aspx Arizona State Library]. Also the [http://www.lincolncountynv.org/about/county.htm Lincoln], [http://www.nyecounty.net/ Nye], and [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave] counties.  
  
18 Feb 1869 - [[Utah]] also laid claim to land in the southeastern corner of Nevada by creating [[Rio Virgin County, Utah|Rio Virgin County]] from land in [[Washington County, Utah]]; as well as land outside of Utah in Nevada and Arizona.<ref>Utah Terr. Laws 1869, 18th sess., ch. 10/p. 7; Atlas of Utah, 163-164</ref> This county named for the Virgin River. Look for records in [http://www.washco.utah.gov/ Washington], [http://www.lincolncountynv.org/about/county.htm Lincoln], [http://www.nyecounty.net/ Nye], and [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave] counties.
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18 Feb 1869 - [[Utah]] also laid claim to land in the southeastern corner of Nevada by creating [[Rio Virgin County, Utah|Rio Virgin County]] from land in [[Washington County, Utah]]; as well as land outside of Utah in Nevada and Arizona.<ref>Utah Terr. Laws 1869, 18th sess., ch. 10/p. 7; Atlas of Utah, 163-164</ref> This county named for the Virgin River. Look for records in [http://www.washco.utah.gov/ Washington], [http://www.lincolncountynv.org/about/county.htm Lincoln], [http://www.nyecounty.net/ Nye], and [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave] counties.  
  
14 Feb 1871 - Arizona created [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ pp. 53-54</ref> This county named for the Maricopa Indians. Look for records in [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.<br>
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14 Feb 1871 - Arizona created [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ pp. 53-54</ref> This county named for the Maricopa Indians. Look for records in [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.<br> 18 Feb 1871 - Arizona discontinued [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ p. 87</ref> In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Pah-Ute County still in Arizona was returned to Mohave County. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave County].<br><br> 16 Feb 1872 - Utah discontinued [[Rio Virgin County, Utah|Rio Virgin County]].<ref>Utah Terr. Laws 1872, 20th sess., ch. 19, sec. 2/p. 28</ref> In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Rio Virgin County still in Utah was returned to [[Washington County, Utah|Washington County]]. Look for records in [http://www.washco.utah.gov/ Washington County].  
18 Feb 1871 - Arizona discontinued [[Pah-Ute County, Arizona|Pah-Ute County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ p. 87</ref> In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Pah-Ute County still in Arizona was returned to Mohave County. Look for records in [http://www.mohavecounty.us/ Mohave County].<br><br>
 
16 Feb 1872 - Utah discontinued [[Rio Virgin County, Utah|Rio Virgin County]].<ref>Utah Terr. Laws 1872, 20th sess., ch. 19, sec. 2/p. 28</ref> In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Rio Virgin County still in Utah was returned to [[Washington County, Utah|Washington County]]. Look for records in [http://www.washco.utah.gov/ Washington County].
 
  
1 Feb 1875 - Arizona created [[Pinal County, Arizona|Pinal County]] from lands in [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1875, 8th assy./ pp. 19-20</ref> This county named for the Pinal mountains. Look for records in [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa], [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima], and [http://pinalcountyaz.gov/Pages/Home.aspx Pinal] counties.
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1 Feb 1875 - Arizona created [[Pinal County, Arizona|Pinal County]] from lands in [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1875, 8th assy./ pp. 19-20</ref> This county named for the Pinal mountains. Look for records in [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa], [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima], and [http://pinalcountyaz.gov/Pages/Home.aspx Pinal] counties.  
  
14 Feb 1879 - Arizona created [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1879, 10th assy./ pp. 96-97</ref> This county named for the Apache Indians. Look for records in [http://www.co.apache.az.us/ Apache] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.
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14 Feb 1879 - Arizona created [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1879, 10th assy./ pp. 96-97</ref> This county named for the Apache Indians. Look for records in [http://www.co.apache.az.us/ Apache] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.  
  
1 Feb 1881 - Arizona created [[Cochise County, Arizona|Cochise County]] from the eastern part of [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 4-7</ref> This county named for Cochise, the great Apache warrior who had died seven years before. Look for records in [http://www.cochise.az.gov/ Cochise] and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.<br>
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1 Feb 1881 - Arizona created [[Cochise County, Arizona|Cochise County]] from the eastern part of [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 4-7</ref> This county named for Cochise, the great Apache warrior who had died seven years before. Look for records in [http://www.cochise.az.gov/ Cochise] and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.<br> 8 Feb 1881 - Arizona created [[Gila County, Arizona|Gila County]] from lands in [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 14-17</ref> This county named for the Gila River. Look for records in the [http://www.gilacountyaz.gov/ Gila], [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa], and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.<br> 10 Mar 1881 - Arizona created [[Graham County, Arizona|Graham County]] from lands in [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 155-157</ref> This county named for Mount Graham, the highest peak in the area. Look for records in [http://www.co.apache.az.us/ Apache], [http://www.graham.az.gov/Graham_CMS/default.aspx Graham], and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.  
8 Feb 1881 - Arizona created [[Gila County, Arizona|Gila County]] from lands in [[Maricopa County, Arizona|Maricopa]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 14-17</ref> This county named for the Gila River. Look for records in the [http://www.gilacountyaz.gov/ Gila], [http://www.maricopa.gov/ Maricopa], and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.<br>
 
10 Mar 1881 - Arizona created [[Graham County, Arizona|Graham County]] from lands in [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache]] and [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima]] counties.<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 155-157</ref> This county named for Mount Graham, the highest peak in the area. Look for records in [http://www.co.apache.az.us/ Apache], [http://www.graham.az.gov/Graham_CMS/default.aspx Graham], and [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] counties.
 
  
19 Feb 1891 - Arizona created [[Coconino County, Arizona|Coconino County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1891, 16th assy./ pp. 26-34</ref> This county named for the Coconino Indians. Look for records in [http://www.coconino.az.gov/ Coconino] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.
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19 Feb 1891 - Arizona created [[Coconino County, Arizona|Coconino County]] from land in [[Yavapai County, Arizona|Yavapai County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1891, 16th assy./ pp. 26-34</ref> This county named for the Coconino Indians. Look for records in [http://www.coconino.az.gov/ Coconino] and [http://www.yavapai.us/ Yavapai] counties.  
  
21 Mar 1895 - Arizona created [[Navajo County, Arizona|Navajo County]] from the west half of [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1895, 18th assy./ pp. 96-105</ref> This county named for the Navajo Indians. Look for records in [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache]] and [http://www.navajocountyaz.gov/ Navajo] counties.
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21 Mar 1895 - Arizona created [[Navajo County, Arizona|Navajo County]] from the west half of [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1895, 18th assy./ pp. 96-105</ref> This county named for the Navajo Indians. Look for records in [[Apache County, Arizona|Apache]] and [http://www.navajocountyaz.gov/ Navajo] counties.  
  
15 Mar 1899 - Arizona created [[Santa Cruz County, Arizona|Santa Cruz County]] from land in [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1899, 20th assy./ pp. 49-57</ref> This county named for the Santa Cruz River. Look for records in [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] and [http://www.co.santa-cruz.az.us/ Santa Cruz] counties.
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15 Mar 1899 - Arizona created [[Santa Cruz County, Arizona|Santa Cruz County]] from land in [[Pima County, Arizona|Pima County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1899, 20th assy./ pp. 49-57</ref> This county named for the Santa Cruz River. Look for records in [http://www.pima.gov/ Pima] and [http://www.co.santa-cruz.az.us/ Santa Cruz] counties.  
  
10 Mar 1909 - Arizona created [[Greenlee County, Arizona|Greenlee County]] from land in [[Graham County, Arizona|Graham County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1909, 25th assy./ pp. 43-56</ref> This county named for an early Arizona pioneer. Look for records in [http://www.graham.az.gov/Graham_CMS/default.aspx Graham] and [http://www.co.greenlee.az.us/ Greenlee] counties.
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10 Mar 1909 - Arizona created [[Greenlee County, Arizona|Greenlee County]] from land in [[Graham County, Arizona|Graham County]].<ref>Ariz. Terr. Laws 1909, 25th assy./ pp. 43-56</ref> This county named for an early Arizona pioneer. Look for records in [http://www.graham.az.gov/Graham_CMS/default.aspx Graham] and [http://www.co.greenlee.az.us/ Greenlee] counties.  
  
27 Apr 1983 - Arizona created [[La Paz County, Arizona|La Paz County]] from the northern half of [[Yuma County, Arizona|Yuma County]].<ref>Ariz. Laws 1983, 36th assy., ch. 291/pp. 1089-1094</ref> This county named for the town of La Paz, Arizona. Look for records in [http://www.co.la-paz.az.us/ La Paz] and [http://www.co.yuma.az.us/ Yuma] counties.
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27 Apr 1983 - Arizona created [[La Paz County, Arizona|La Paz County]] from the northern half of [[Yuma County, Arizona|Yuma County]].<ref>Ariz. Laws 1983, 36th assy., ch. 291/pp. 1089-1094</ref> This county named for the town of La Paz, Arizona. Look for records in [http://www.co.la-paz.az.us/ La Paz] and [http://www.co.yuma.az.us/ Yuma] counties.  
  
===References ===
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=== References ===
  
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
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[[Category:Arizona]]

Revision as of 05:10, 12 November 2012

United States go to Arizona go to Previous Jurisdictions to land in Arizona

Previous Jurisdictions and Record Repositories

Locating records of your ancestors

  • Find where your ancestor lived
  • Identify when your ancestor live there
  • Locate the jurisdiction covering the land where your ancestor lived
  • Determine the record repositories for that jurisdiction

For example, suppose you believe your ancestor lived in Tucson, Arizona in 1861.

  • In the present day, Tucson is indeed located in the State of Arizona.
  • But Arizona didn't exist in 1856. Arizona Territory wasn't created until 1863.
  • Before that, the land belonged to New Mexico Territory, which was created in 1850. So your ancestor lived in New Mexico Territory. This jurisdiction still exists today as the State of New Mexico.
  • In 1853, the US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico, which contained land south of the Gila River. This is the land where Tucson is located. In 1854, this land was given to New Mexico Territory and in 1855 this land was added to Dona Ana county.
  • Then in 1860, New Mexico created Arizona county from the land in Dona Ana county. Arizona County existed totally within the present day State of Arizona. So your ancestor lived in Arizona County in the New Mexico Territory. But Arizona county was discontinued in 1862, then recreated in 1863 and finally discontinued again when Arizona Territory was created in 1863. The records from this extinct county are found in the present day in Dona Ana County in the State of New Mexico.

Putting this altogether, your ancestor actually lived in Tucson, Arizona County, New Mexico Territory in 1861. Therefore look for records in Tucson, Dona Ana County, and the State of New Mexico archives.

Sometimes, records were recorded in a county where your ancestor did not live. Maybe there was confusion as to where the borders lay. Or maybe it was a shorter distance to the neighboring county seat. There could be several reasons, so don't overlook records in nearby counties. But treat this as the exception to the rule and check the most obvious county first.

Spanish and Mexican land (from 1820 to 1846) that would later become Arizona

Spain laid claim to much of the land in the present day southwestern US. Because of the great distances and the hostilities of the Indian tribes, Spanish rule was only extended to the southern portion of present day Arizona, and at times not even that much. Tucson was the only permanent town established.

Spain establish the practice of giving land grants to encourage settlement on the fringes of their rule. Mexico continued this practice. All Spanish and Mexican land grants were located in the Gadsden Purchase. If you stand in downtown Tucson and and look to the southeast corner of present day Arizona, then turn 90 degrees to your right along the border. All of these Spanish and Mexican Land Grants are located in that triangle.

1820 - The San Ignacio de la Canoa Grant. Two brothers petitioned the governor of Sonora/Sinaloa for four leagues (sitios) to raise cattle and horses. Title was issued by Mexico in 1849 and Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1899. This land grand was located on both sides of Interstate 19 south of Green Valley (that town is in the northwest corner of the grant).

1820 - The San Bernardino Grant south of Bisbee was also applied for by Ignacio de Perez, a Spanish lieutenant, who paid $90 for four leagues. The grant was surveyed in 1821 and recorded in Arizpe, Sonora but no title was ever issued. Most of the grant is located south of the border. The Court of Private Land Claims confirmed only the 2,383 acres that are on the American side.

1821 - Southwest of Patagonia is the San José de Sonoita Grant, the smallest grant made in Arizona. It was applied for in 1821 by Leon Herreras, a resident of Tubac, who had it surveyed and who received a Mexican title in 1825 for 7,598 acres. Court of Private Land Claims rejected that title on the grounds that the treasurer of Sonora had no authority to sell land in that area, but U. S. Supreme Court overturned the rejection. However it only confirmed 5,123 acres.

1821 - The San Rafael de la Zanja Grant, just to the north of the Mexican border, east of the Patagonia Mountains. The four-league grant was sold at public auction for $1,297 and title was issued by Mexico in 1825. Court of Private Land Claims confirmed the grant in 1902.

24 Aug 1821 - The Treaty of Cordoba was signed by Spain, which recognized Mexico's independence. Land in present day Arizona became part of the Republic of Mexico.[1] But effectively Mexico only controlled the southern part, which was placed in the State of Vieja California. Look for records in the Spain and Mexico Archives.

1827 - The Buena Vista Grant straddles the international boundary just east of Nogales and two thirds of it is in Mexico.

1827 - The San Ignacio del Babocomari Grant looks on a map like a twenty miles long boomerang north and west of Fort Huachuca. The petitioners paid in 1827 all of $380 for the nearly fifty-three square miles of the grant.

1827 - The San Juan de las Boquillas y Nogales Grant is located along the San Pedro River west of Tombstone. Title was issued in 1833

1827 - The San Rafael del Valle Grant is adjoined to the San Juan grant on the south. Title was issued in 1832. The San Rafael Grant was at first rejected by Court of Private Land Claims, but the rejection was overturned in the U.S. Supreme Court.

New Mexico Territory land (from 1846 To 1863) that would later become Arizona

18 Aug 1846 - During the war with Mexico, the US took control of Santa Fe and proclaimed sovereignty over the land that later became the New Mexico Territory.[2] Look for records in the National Archives and Records Administration, the Mexico Archives and the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives.

4 July 1848 - The US obtained clear title to the previous Mexico land. Through the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Mexico ceded all of present day California, Nevada, and Utah, and parts of present day Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Part of the international boundary was in dispute.[3] The land south of the Gila River in present day Arizona was not ceded, it remained in control of Mexico. Look for records in the National Archives and Records Administration, the Mexico Archives and the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives.

13 Dec 1850 - The US created the New Mexico Territory from unorganized federal land.[4] This territory named after the country of Mexico. Some counties were created, but they were small and covered land only in present day New Mexico. The land in the present day Arizona was at that time unorganized county land. Also the land south of the Gila River still belonged to Mexico. Look for records in the Mexico Archives and the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives.

9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundaries of Bernalillo, Rio Arriba, Santa Ana (extinct), Taos, and Valencia counties were stretched across present day Arizona and Nevada to the California border.[5] Look for records in Bernalillo, Rio Arriba, Taos, and Valencia counties.
9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of Socorro County was stretched across present day Arizona to the California border.[6] Look for records in Socorro County.
9 Jan 1852 - New Mexico redefined the boundaries of previous counties and created new ones to cover all the land within its territory. The boundary of Dona Ana County was stretched to include land in present day Arizona.[7] Look for records in Dona Ana County.

30 Dec 1853 - The US bought the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico. It contained lands south of the Gila River in present day Arizona and New Mexico. It also settled the International boundary dispute between the United States and Mexico.[8] Look for records in the National Archives and Records Administration, the Mexico Archives, and the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives.

4 Aug 1854 - The land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase was officially added to New Mexico Territory, it became non-county land.[9] Look for records in the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives.

3 Feb 1855 - Dona Ana County gained all the land acquired in the Gadsden Purchase.[10] The boundary was stretched across present day Arizona to the Baja California border. Look for records in Dona Ana County.

1 Feb 1860 - New Mexico created Arizona County from land in Dona Ana County.[11] Arizona County was located entirely within present day Arizona. Look for records in Dona Ana County.

12 Jan 1861 - New Mexico created San Juan (original, extinct) from land in Taos County.[12] Look for records in Taos County.

18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued San Juan (original, extinct) returning the land to Taos County.[13] Look for records in Taos County.
18 Jan 1862 - New Mexico discontinued Arizona County returning the land to Dona Ana County.[14] Look for records in Dona Ana County.

28 Jan 1863 - New Mexico re-created Arizona County from Dona Ana County.[15] Look for records in Dona Ana County.

Arizona land (from 1863 To Now)

24 Feb 1863 - The US created the Arizona Territory from the western half of New Mexico Territory.[16] All previous counties were discontinued for this new territory. Look for records in the Arizona State Library and New Mexico State Records Center and Archives

10 Nov 1864 - Arizona created four counties: Mohave, Pima, Yavapai, and Yuma counties.[17] All four of these counties named for Indian tribes. Look for records in Mohave, Pima, Yavapai, and Yuma counties.

22 Dec 1865 - Arizona created Pah-Ute County from the northern half of Mohave County.[18] This county named for the Paiute Indians, using the spelling of that day. Both Mohave and Pah-Ute counties covered land which was later given to Nevada. Look for records in Mohave County.

5 May 1866 - The US removed the northwest corner from Arizona Territory (parts of Pah-Ute and Mohave counties) and gave that land to the State of Nevada.[19] Nevada used that land to add to Lincoln and Nye counties. But Arizona previously had claim to that land and opposed this transfer, twice petitioning congress to repeal the law. Up thru 1868, representatives from Pah-Ute County attended the Arizona Legislature. Look for records in Nevada State Library and Archives and Arizona State Library. Also the Lincoln, Nye, and Mohave counties.

18 Feb 1869 - Utah also laid claim to land in the southeastern corner of Nevada by creating Rio Virgin County from land in Washington County, Utah; as well as land outside of Utah in Nevada and Arizona.[20] This county named for the Virgin River. Look for records in Washington, Lincoln, Nye, and Mohave counties.

14 Feb 1871 - Arizona created Maricopa County from land in Yavapai County.[21] This county named for the Maricopa Indians. Look for records in Maricopa and Yavapai counties.
18 Feb 1871 - Arizona discontinued Pah-Ute County.[22] In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Pah-Ute County still in Arizona was returned to Mohave County. Look for records in Mohave County.

16 Feb 1872 - Utah discontinued Rio Virgin County.[23] In effect, withdrawing claim to that land after exhausting all legal recourse. The remnant of Rio Virgin County still in Utah was returned to Washington County. Look for records in Washington County.

1 Feb 1875 - Arizona created Pinal County from lands in Maricopa and Pima counties.[24] This county named for the Pinal mountains. Look for records in Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal counties.

14 Feb 1879 - Arizona created Apache County from land in Yavapai County.[25] This county named for the Apache Indians. Look for records in Apache and Yavapai counties.

1 Feb 1881 - Arizona created Cochise County from the eastern part of Pima County.[26] This county named for Cochise, the great Apache warrior who had died seven years before. Look for records in Cochise and Pima counties.
8 Feb 1881 - Arizona created Gila County from lands in Maricopa and Pima County counties.[27] This county named for the Gila River. Look for records in the Gila, Maricopa, and Pima counties.
10 Mar 1881 - Arizona created Graham County from lands in Apache and Pima counties.[28] This county named for Mount Graham, the highest peak in the area. Look for records in Apache, Graham, and Pima counties.

19 Feb 1891 - Arizona created Coconino County from land in Yavapai County.[29] This county named for the Coconino Indians. Look for records in Coconino and Yavapai counties.

21 Mar 1895 - Arizona created Navajo County from the west half of Apache County.[30] This county named for the Navajo Indians. Look for records in Apache and Navajo counties.

15 Mar 1899 - Arizona created Santa Cruz County from land in Pima County.[31] This county named for the Santa Cruz River. Look for records in Pima and Santa Cruz counties.

10 Mar 1909 - Arizona created Greenlee County from land in Graham County.[32] This county named for an early Arizona pioneer. Look for records in Graham and Greenlee counties.

27 Apr 1983 - Arizona created La Paz County from the northern half of Yuma County.[33] This county named for the town of La Paz, Arizona. Look for records in La Paz and Yuma counties.

References

  1. Beers, 100; "Mexican War of Independence," New Handbook of Texas, 4:698
  2. Williams 108-110
  3. U.S. Stat., vol. 9, pp. 922-943; Parry, 102: 29-59; Van Zandt, 11, 28-29; Walker and Bufkin, 19, 20A
  4. U.S. Stat., vol. 9, ch. 49[1850]/pp. 446-452; Baldwin, 117-137; Van Zandt, 28-29, 162-165
  5. N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /p. 292
  6. N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292
  7. N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 1st sess./p. 119; N.M. Terr. Laws 1851, 1st assy., 2d sess. /pp. 266, 292
  8. U.S. Stat., vol. 10, pp. 1031-1037; Van Zandt, 11, 29, 162
  9. U.S. Stat., vol. 10, ch. 245[1854]/p. 575; Van Zandt, 162; Walker and Bufkin, 21-22
  10. N.M. Terr. Laws 1854, 4th assy. /p. 57
  11. N.M. Terr. Laws 1859-1860, 9th assy. /p. 74
  12. N.M. Terr. Laws 1860-1861, 10th assy. /p. 16
  13. N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 16
  14. N.M. Terr. Laws 1861-1862, 11th assy. /p. 18
  15. N.M. Terr. Laws 1862-1863, 12th assy. /p.30
  16. U.S. Stat., vol. 12, ch. 56[1863]/pp. 664-665; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy./ pp. vii-viii; Van Zandt, 162
  17. Howell Code, Ariz. Terr. Laws 1864, 1st assy., ch. 2/ pp. 24-25
  18. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1865, 2d assy./ pp. 19-20
  19. U.S. Stat., vol. 14, ch. 73[1866]/p. 43; Van Zandt, 158, 165; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1867, 3rd assy./ pp. 67-68; Ariz. Terr. Laws 1868, 4th assy./ pp. 68-69
  20. Utah Terr. Laws 1869, 18th sess., ch. 10/p. 7; Atlas of Utah, 163-164
  21. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ pp. 53-54
  22. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1871, 6th assy./ p. 87
  23. Utah Terr. Laws 1872, 20th sess., ch. 19, sec. 2/p. 28
  24. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1875, 8th assy./ pp. 19-20
  25. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1879, 10th assy./ pp. 96-97
  26. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 4-7
  27. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 14-17
  28. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1881, 11th assy./ pp. 155-157
  29. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1891, 16th assy./ pp. 26-34
  30. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1895, 18th assy./ pp. 96-105
  31. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1899, 20th assy./ pp. 49-57
  32. Ariz. Terr. Laws 1909, 25th assy./ pp. 43-56
  33. Ariz. Laws 1983, 36th assy., ch. 291/pp. 1089-1094